Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS)

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  1. Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Susan M. Dannemiller, Ph.D. sdannemiller@att.net Wisconsin PBIS Network www.wisconsinpbisnetwork.org

  2. This PowerPoint has been adopted by Wisconsin PBIS Network with the guidance from: PBIS Maryland OSEPTechnical Assistance Center Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports

  3. What is PBIS ? “PBIS” is a research-based systems approach designed to enhance the capacity of schools to… • effectively educate all students, including students with challenging social behaviors • adopt & sustain the use of effective instructional practices

  4. Where/how did PBIS originate? • 1994 Fern Ridge Middle School (Oregon) – 880 students and had 5,000 office discipline referrals in one year) • University of Oregon – National Center for PBIS • All 50 states have PBIS coordinating system through their DPI

  5. Whole school involvement • Positive approach – 5 min/day retrieved = 15 hours/year of extra instruction • Team based problem solving approach • Outcome focused

  6. PBIS - The Big Ideas Decide what is important for students to know (behavioralexpectations - local standards for student behavior, reading & math) Teach what is important for students to know (high quality instruction= differentiation) Acknowledge students for demonstrating skills Keep track of how students are doing ( data, data, data) Make changes according to the results (interventions at 3 tiers-give kids what they need)

  7. School-Wide Systems for Student Success:A Response to Intervention (RtI) Model Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions 1-5% • Individual students • Assessment-based • High intensity • 1-5% Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions • Individual students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • 5-15% Tier 2/Secondary Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Small group interventions • Some individualizing • Tier 2/Secondary Interventions 5-15% • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Small group interventions • Some individualizing • Tier 1/Universal Interventions 80-90% • All students • Preventive, proactive • 80-90% Tier 1/Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Illinois PBIS Network, Revised May 15, 2008. Adapted from “What is school-wide PBS?” OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Accessed at http://pbis.org/school-wide.htm

  8. Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  9. Elements: Tier 1 Universal • Establish a team to carry on the PBIS efforts in the building • Establish and maintain faculty commitment • Establish effective procedures for dealing with discipline • Establish data entry and data analysis plan • 5. Develop school wide expectations and rules • 6. Establish a recognition/acknowledgement system • Create lesson plans and system for teaching behavior • Develop and implementation plan • Overview of PBIS in the classroom • Foreshadow evaluation components

  10. Establish a Core PBIS Team • Principal or other administrator • Internal coach • External coach • Data specialist • Behavior specialist • Representatives of building

  11. Core team: • Meets monthly • Develops/integrates program • Communicates program components to all • Reviews and analyzes data

  12. Establish Discipline Procedures • Operationally define appropriate behaviors • Devise tracking and reporting process • Train all staff on both of above • Determine consequences for inappropriate behavior – classroom and building level

  13. Develop school-wide expectations and rules • 3-5 school-wide broadly stated over-arching rules – apply to all students and staff (the general ways people will behave) • Examples: Be Safe, Be Responsible, Be Respectful

  14. Develop specifics for each school venue • Positively stated telling students what to do (not what not to do) • Describes appropriate behavior in each school setting – classroom, hallway, cafeteria, bus, playground, etc. • Students come to school from many and varied backgrounds – can not assume anything anymore

  15. Teach appropriate behaviors as defined • Entire school focuses teaching on same topic • Teach the expected behavior directly through a lesson plan • Teach in natural setting (teach playground behavior on the playground) • All adults responsible for teaching, reteaching, modeling, and practicing • Teaching is done to fluency

  16. Data collection and analysis • Office Discipline Referral form – collect tracking data on inappropriate behavior • Number of Office Discipline Referral forms/day/month • Reason for the referral • Location • Time of day • Student(s) involved

  17. Disaggregate data by race/ethnicity and special education status • Need to determine if there is a problem • And if so, what, where, who, when

  18. What needs to be decided? • Do we have a problem? • Why is it happening? – hypotheses • What are the practical solutions? • How can we monitor the effectiveness of the solution?

  19. Acknowledgement System • 5-1 positive for every negative • Frequent positive feedback establishes appropriate behavior • Acknowledge behavior not the person • Acknowledge students and staff

  20. Psychology 101 – Reinforcement Theory • Reinforcements move from: • Highly frequent to less frequent • Predictable to unpredictable • Tangible to social • Other-delivered to self-delivered • Something for everyone

  21. What about consequences? • Consequence still exist but the focus in on positive behavior

  22. Elements of Tier 2 • 5-15% of students have difficulty • Find ways to work with small groups and re-teach the same material again in a different way • Ex.: Check-in, Check-out (CICO), Small group instruction, other interventions

  23. Work with groups to maximize efficiency • Not every student “gets it” with just the universal level program • Provide additional intervention – based on data that is tracked and monitored • This means additional instruction, acknowledging, data collection, monitoring

  24. Elements of Tier 3 • 1-5 % of student population • Individually designed interventions • Ex.: behavior intervention plan, regularly scheduled progress meetings with all concerned,

  25. Wisconsin PBIS Process • www.wisconsinpbisnetwork.org • Administrative overview half-day to develop interest and readiness • Two-day training for core team • One-day follow-up later for technical assistance • CESAs providing other support opportunities

  26. Resources: • www.pbis.org • www.wisconsinpbisnetwork.org • Google PBIS and specific states: Florida, Illinois, Oregon, Maryland • Your CESA