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CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures PowerPoint Presentation
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CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures

CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures

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CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures

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  1. CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures A. The three procedures listed below are possible ways of slowing your car in case of total brake failure. Match each procedure with its result. b c a
  2. CHAPTER 15 Vehicular Emergencies STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 1 (Continued) Engine, Brake, and Steering Failures B. Suppose you have tried the above methods without success. Study the picture. Explain what you might do to stop yourself at each numbered spot if you were driving vehicle X and your brakes were not working. Then add one more emergency measure you might try. 1. hit barrier or curb 2. drive into open area (parking lot) 3. drive into open area (road) 4. drive uphill 5. Another measure to try when the brakes fail is: Sideswipe an object such as parked car rather than hit another vehicle head-on.
  3. C. FIND OUT MORE. The chapter lists several emergency items to keep in the trunk of your vehicle. What are they? Ask someone you know who drives what they keep in their vehicle for emergencies. How is this person’s answer different from what the chapter lists? [Responsible Driving Text] Emergency Items Flashlight with extra batteries Jumper cables Flares, warning triangles, or reflectors Coolant and windshield-washer fluid Wiping cloth Ice scraper, snow brush, and snow shovel Jack with flat board for soft surfaces Lug wrench Screwdriver, pliers, duct tape, and adjustable wrench Fire extinguisher Blanket and heavy gloves Drinking water First-aid kit Pencil and notebook
  4. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 2 Tire Failure and Other Serious Problems A. The following steps outline what you should do if a tire suddenly loses pressure, but they are in the wrong order: In the space next to each step, write a number to show where in the order it should appear. Check the traffic around you. When you find a gap, signal and steer off the roadway as faras you can. 3 Get out of the vehicle, and have any passengers get out also. 5 Keep a firm grip on the steering wheel with both hands. 1 Shift into Park (or Reverse in a manual-shift vehicle), and put on your emergency flashers. 4 Release the accelerator slowly. Don’t brake! 2
  5. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 2 (continued) Tire Failure and Other Serious Problems B. For each sentence below, circle T if the statement is true and F if it is false. Correct each false statement in the space below. 1. Between 300 and 400 people are killed yearly while changing tires, when the vehicle falls off the jack or they are hit by other vehicles. True Move Over Law http://www.nj.gov/oag/hts/move-over-law/ 2. An engine fire cannot be put out with water. True 3. Jump-starting a battery whose fluid is frozen can cause the battery to explode. True 4. Check the brake-fluid level once a month if more you drive 10,000 miles or a year. True
  6. C. FIND OUT MORE. Tires are rated by their safety features to help you make good purchasing decisions. Go online, or call a local tire store; find out what features tires are rated on, what the possible “grades” are, and what a good rating is. Summarize your findings below. How are tires rated? By Load Index and Speed Rating What is a good rating? Depends on what kind of vehicle you have. What is “run-flat” technology? A run-flat tire is is designed to resist the effects of deflation when punctured, and to enable the vehicle to continue to be driven at reduced speeds (up to 55 mph), and for limited distances of up to 100 mi, or even 200 mi depending on the type of tire.
  7. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 3 Waiting for Help and Protecting the Scene Read the following paragraph that describes a situation in which a vehicle you are driving breaks down. In the space below the paragraph, write down what was done correctly under the “Right” heading and what was not correctly done, under “Wrong.” You are driving down the interstate highway when you notice your vehicle’s temperature gauge beginning to climb. You decide to wait to see if it gets any worse. Finally, the temperature gets very high and you decide to pull over. You are now driving in a road construction area where there is very little shoulder available. You get out of your vehicle, tie a scarf on the right-hand side door handle, and open the vehicle’s trunk. You then turn on the vehicle’s emergency flashers, and since it is very cold outside, you get back into the vehicle and wait for help. You are careful to close the window all the way, since your heater is keeping you warm and you do not want to waste the heat. Soon someone sees you and pulls over. The person comes over to your vehicle, and you get out. RIGHT Recognized the temp climbing, pulled over, tied the scarf, turned on emergency flashers, tried to stay warm. WRONG Did not stop right after temperature began to climb, pulled off near construction area, tied scarf to shoulder side of vehicle, raised trunk lid, closed window completely while inside vehicle, got out of vehicle to meet stranger who stopped.
  8. FIND OUT MORE. Think about what would happen if you had a roadside emergency (ie. flat tire, ran out of gas, broke down, etc). Find out about the costs associated with roadside services. Who would you call if you were far away from your family and/or friends and had an emergency? Do you or your family have or did your vehicle come with a roadside assistance plan? If so, what is the plan and how much did it cost? Pretend you do not have any kind of emergency roadside assistance and you had an emergency… How much do they charge to fix a flat tire? Roadside tire change – $100 - $250 Tow - $100 - $150 Puncture repair - $10-$20 New tire – $50 - $250 How much do they charge to help someone who runs out of gas? New gas can – $5 - $10 Gasoline - $3.19 - $4.49/gallon How much is the towing charge per mile? Tow costs will vary.
  9. http://midatlantic.aaa.com/Membership/Types/ http://midatlantic.aaa.com/Membership/Overview
  10. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 4 If You Are Involved in a Collision A. You are driving at 55 mph in the right-hand lane of the freeway. Traffic ahead of you slows down to a near stop; since you see some highway construction warning signs, you figure that this is the reason for the slowdown. The vehicle directly behind you does not notice you slowing down and hits you from behind. You, in turn, hit the vehicle ahead of you. You are feeling fine, but your passenger says that her neck and back are hurting from the collision. The driver of the vehicle that hit you comes to your vehicle and acts very mad at you, saying that the accident was your fault because your brake lights were not working. What actions will you take at the accident scene, and in what order? What will you say to the driver of the vehicle that hit you? Warn others, help your passenger and make sure NOT to move them. Call 911. Helpany other injured people, get medical help, call the police exchange information stay at the scene make accident reports get names and addresses of witnesses, and get your passenger help. You should remain calm when talking with the driver of the vehicle that hit you from behind, and you should not admit guilt.
  11. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 4 (continued) If You Are Involved in a Collision B. For each sentence below, circle T if the statement is true and F if it is false. Correct each false statement in the space below. 1. When a driver is involved in a collision, the driver should never move the vehicle until the police arrive. False - If possible, a driver should move the vehicle off the roadway and out of traffic. 2. After a collision, reflective triangles should be set up no more than 50 feet in front of and behind a vehicle. False - Reflective triangles should he set up at least 100 feet in front of and behind the vehicle. 3. If you are involved in a collision that results in serious injury or death, you must not leave the accident scene until the police allow you to go. True 4. People involved in a collision should be moved immediately out of their vehicles to a safe spot on the side of the road. False - If the people involved in the collision were injured, they should not be moved.
  12. STUDY GUIDE FOR CHAPTER 15 LESSON 4 (continued) If You Are Involved in a Collision C. FIND OUT MORE. Look at your state driver’s manual. Under what conditions must you file an accident report? Reporting Accidents (N.J.S.A. 39:4-130, 39:4-131) New Jersey law requires motorists to notify the police of accidents where there is injury, death, or vehicle or property damage. If someone has been killed, do not move the body or permit anyone to move the body until the police or ambulance arrives. If the motorist is involved in the accident, he/she can help the police by answering as many questions as possible and by giving them as many facts about the accident as possible. When damage to property is more than $500 or there is personal injury, a motorist must: Send a written report to the MVC within 10 days if no police report is filed. A written report is not required if a report is filed by police. A motorist can get a copy of the report form from the police. Notify his/her insurance company at once, giving complete information about the accident. If the motorist is shaken up, he/she should see a doctor as soon as possible.