Download
rethinking monographic acquisition developing a demand driven purchase model for academic books n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model for Academic Books PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model for Academic Books

Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model for Academic Books

663 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model for Academic Books

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model for Academic Books Michael Levine-Clark, University of Denver michael.levine-clark@du.edu Steve Bosch, University of Arizona boschs@u.library.arizona.edu Kim Anderson, Blackwell kim.anderson@blackwell.com Matt Nauman, Blackwell matt.nauman@blackwell.com

  2. Why Demand-Driven Acquisition Makes Sense

  3. University of Denver Data • 1999-May 2008 • 208,248 titles (21,921 a year) • 47.77% unused (99,480) • FY 2008 • Approx $1 million spent on monographs • 47.77% = $477,700

  4. University of Denver Data (2) • Books Published 2005-2009: 89,496 Titles • 0 Circulations: 47,257 (52.80%) • 1 Circulation: 21,810 (24.37%) • 2 Circulations: 9,809 (10.96%) • 3 Circulations: 4,816 (5.38%) • 4 Circulations: 2,484 (2.78%) • 5+ Circulations: 3,320 (3.71%)

  5. The Universe of Titles • 170,663 books published in the U.S. in 2008* • 53,869 books treated on approval by Blackwell in FY 2008 (North America) • 23,097 forms generated in FY 2008 • 4,687 titles ordered from forms *Library and Book Trade Almanac 2009, p. 506 (preliminary data).

  6. Everything is Different • Users expect everything • Born-digital books won’t go out of print • We’re more accountable to our administrations • Budget • Shelf space

  7. Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model Two basic reasons for changing models: • ROI – return on investment • In a digital world dominated by network level discovery and access- it is not about the local collection anymore, follow the users.

  8. Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model ROI – in since 2000: Total # of books purchased 448,840 Total exp for books $ 24,531,340 Total # 0 circ books 237,885 Total exp for 0 circ books $ 13,001,610 Shelving costs $ 2,440,582 Processing costs $ 3,394,622 Total cost of 0 circ books $ 18,836,814

  9. Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model Network level discovery and access: This is where our users are going and we need to have business models that support that type of user experience - not building local collections. Users must have the broadest possible access w/o dead ends – one way or another they need to be able to quickly obtain the discovered information.

  10. Is this what the digital natives will find useful as a library? OR

  11. Is this the future “collection”?

  12. How We’re Implementing Demand-Driven Acquisition

  13. The University of Denver Plan • Pilot, January 2010 • P/E-Books • Humanities forms • No fiction, reprints, or textbooks • Discovery through the catalog • POD (eventually) • Automatic approval books will continue to come automatically

  14. The User Experience • Discovery (catalog) • Print and/or e-book(s) • Request (catalog) • Fast, seamless • Ordering • Alternative Sources • Rush (or not?)

  15. Implications

  16. Rethinking Monographic Acquisition: Developing a Demand-Driven Purchase Model What about? • Collections of record • Current structures and processes in collection management and acquisitions • Traditional user expectations

  17. Impact on Researchers • Can they • Browse the collection? • Get books as needed? • Get older books?

  18. Impact on Libraries • What about ILL? • Better metadata = more sales? (poor metadata = no sales?)

  19. Demand Driven PurchasingImplications for scholarly publishing • Potential Problems • Reduced frontlist sales • Less predictability • Longer timeline for selling new title print runs • Reduced number of copies sold per title • All of the above will increase the cost per title • So – maybe some titles will not be published

  20. Demand driven purchasingimplications for scholarly publishing • There are also potential benefits • Increased ebook sales • This requires simultaneous print & ebooks • And improved discoverability & delivery • Potential for POD • There is also potential to replace a “broken” distribution model with one that works better for all parties

  21. Demand driven purchasingimplications for book vendors • An infrastructure for Demand Driven Purchasing must be developed • The problems faced by publishers will also apply to book vendors • Vendors will have to replace lost revenue • But… • Vendors may be able to develop a better business model