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Major Battles and Events

Major Battles and Events. SOL U.S. I.9e. Fort Sumter. The firing on Fort Sumter , S.C. began the war. Battle of Manassas. The first Battle of Manassas (Bull Run) was the first major battle. BEFORE…. AFTER…. Emancipation Proclamation.

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Major Battles and Events

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  1. Major Battles and Events SOL U.S. I.9e

  2. Fort Sumter • The firing on Fort Sumter, S.C. began the war.

  3. Battle of Manassas • The first Battle of Manassas (Bull Run) was the first major battle.

  4. BEFORE…

  5. AFTER…

  6. Emancipation Proclamation • The signing of the Emancipation Proclamation made “freeing the slaves” the new focus of the war. Many freed slaves joined the Union army.

  7. Battle Of Vicksburg • The Battle of Vicksburg divided the South; the North controlled the Mississippi River.

  8. Battle of Gettysburg • The Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the war; the North repelled Lee’s invasion.

  9. Appomattox Court House • Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House in 1865 ended the war.

  10. Influence of Location and Topography on Critical Developments in the War

  11. The Union blockade of southern ports (e.g., Savannah, Charleston, New Orleans) • Control of the Mississippi River (e.g., Vicksburg) • Battle locations influenced by the struggle to capture capital cities (e.g., Richmond; Washington D.C.) • Control of the high ground (e.g., Gettysburg)

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