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Communities working with the judiciary

Communities working with the judiciary

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Communities working with the judiciary

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Presentation Transcript

  1. To Address Underage Drinking Communities working with the judiciary To obtain copies of today's program materials please visit: http://www.udetc.org/audioconf_judicialpast.asp

  2. Panelists Dr. Ted Miller Principle Research ScientistPacific Institute for Research and EvaluationCalverton, Maryland Ms. Sheila R. Nesbitt Chief of Training and Technical Assistance Minnesota Institute of Public Health Mounds View, Minnesota Mr. Kevin P. Richard, MA Director of Juvenile Services/Specialty Courts Rhode Island Family Court. Providence, Rhode Island

  3. Dr. Ted Miller Principle Research ScientistPacific Institute for Research and Evaluation Calverton, Maryland

  4. Underage Drinking Is Big Business Grades 9-12

  5. Lifetime

  6. Really Big Business 13.6 million underage customers in 2007 $1,820 in annual alcohol sales per kid who drinks illegally

  7. Underage Drinkers Are Great Customers Daily Drinks Per Drinker

  8. Booze Consumed When BAC Will Be > .08

  9. The alcohol industry denies it markets to kids • But the signs are everywhere • Are alcopops for the martini crowd or the beer bellies? • Were the Budweiser frogs, the dinosaurs, or the clever dogs?

  10. % Alcohol Consumption

  11. 47% of Alcopops Are Consumed Illegally by Underage Drinkers

  12. What kind of booze do kids drink?

  13. Bingers grades 6-10, in the past month, drank

  14. % of Total Underage Consumption, CA

  15. % of Drinkers Who Drank Alcopops in the Past Month

  16. Primary Source of ETOH

  17. Nationally, $24.2 Billion of Booze Was Consumed by Underage Drinkers in 2007

  18. A Devastating Tidal Wave of Alcohol-Related Harm Resulted • 3170 deaths • 300 K DWI crashes • 540 K violent crimes • 1.2 million property crimes • 400 K risky sexual encounters • 100K alcohol poisonings & psychoses • 70 K kids in alcohol treatment

  19. DWI Deaths

  20. Lowering MLDA from 21 to 18 would raise alcohol-involved suicide acts among 18 to 20 year olds by 27%

  21. Perpetrator AOD Involvement

  22. Crime: Surveys of Youth Custody & Youth in Adult Custody (excludes 20% of crimes involving ETOH & heroin or cocaine)

  23. Perp ETOH/Drug Involved, All Ages, Self-Report

  24. Cost of Youth Crime

  25. Beverages Involved, Crime, All Ages

  26. 40% of Medically Treated Assault Victims Are BAC-PositiveVictimization Is 7-10 Times As Likely When Someone Is Alcohol-Positive As When (S)he Is Sober

  27. % Youth Sex Alcohol Involved

  28. The Costs are for Events Caused by Alcohol • 90% of alcohol-involved crashes • 50% of alcohol-involved crime & risky sex

  29. Underage Drinking Cost $68 B in 2007

  30. How can we make $68 B comprehensible?

  31. A National Yardstick

  32. Divide by a Sensible Exposure Measure • $5100 Per Underage Drinker • $2280 Per Youth Ages 14-20 • $3.30 Per Illegal Drink

  33. Underage Drinking In the US Cost $68B in 2007

  34. Per Illegal Underage Drink

  35. Fact sheets by state available On web at www.iiaaonline.org/profiles.php • % of alcohol consumed by youth • Costs 2007 update will be out shortly

  36. Journal of Studies on AlcoholJuly 2006 • Societal Costs of Underage Drinking • Ted Miller, David Levy, Rebecca Spicer & Dexter Taylor

  37. Summary • Underage drinking is a big, profitable business • It causes $68 B in harm annually; more than $3/drink • Crimes account for >80% of the costs • Almost 40% of youth violence involves alcohol • In 18% of DWI deaths, underage drinkers were driving

  38. Underage Drinkingand Related Crimes Ted R Miller, PhD Principal Research Associate Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation 410-381-1197 miller@pire.org

  39. Ms. Sheila Nesbitt Chief of Training and Technical Assistance Minnesota Institute of Public Health Mounds View, Minnesota

  40. Zero Adult Provider (ZAP) • Started in St. Paul in 1999. • Law enforcement, prosecutors, judges, probation, campus/community coalition. • Focus on identifying and charging adult providers. • Improve effectiveness of sanctions for underage consumers.

  41. ZAP Roadmap • Know if and when underage drinking is happening • Identify and charge not only the underage drinkers, but more importantly, the illegal provider • Ensure consequences make a difference

  42. Growth of ZAP • Currently 19 of 87 counties received EUDL funds. • Average 253% increase in adult provider arrests in first year of project. • PIRE case study released July 2009. • www.miph.org/projects/eudl

  43. Role of Judges • Judges make great champions. • If a judges invites them, they will be there. • Can make things happen. • Respected voice for the issue. • Direct court scheduling and procedure, including probation. • Search warrants

  44. Considerations/Limitations • Separate and distinct from Executive Branch (law enforcement). • Neutrality. • Not everything is within their control.

  45. How To Work with Judges • A judge from another district • Who in your community has a strong relationship? • Ask their opinion. Don’t tell them what to do. • Understand their philosophy. • Give them credit.

  46. Persuasive Arguments • Change in domestic violence. • Costs of underage drinking. • Early intervention. • Role in prevention.

  47. Kevin P. Richard Director of Juvenile Services/Specialty Courts Rhode Island Family Court Providence, Rhode Island

  48. The Rhode Island Family Court Alcohol Calendar Chief Judge Jeremiah S. Jeremiah, Jr.

  49. Beginnings • Formation of the RI Alcohol Calendar began in 2007. • Several high profile cases involving underage drinking. • Although RI has a unified court system, there was a lack of uniformity throughout cities and towns in handling underage drinking. Additionally, reporting interventions and outcomes was insufficient. • Increasing awareness that family involvement is a necessary requirement for effective intervention.