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Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention: Teaching Positive Social Behavior in a Three-Tiered Syste PowerPoint Presentation
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Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention: Teaching Positive Social Behavior in a Three-Tiered Syste

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention: Teaching Positive Social Behavior in a Three-Tiered Syste

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Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention: Teaching Positive Social Behavior in a Three-Tiered Syste

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  1. Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention: Teaching Positive Social Behavior in a Three-Tiered System of Support Kathleen Lane, Ph.D., BCBA-D Vanderbilt University

  2. Agenda An Overview of Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered Models of Prevention The Importance of Data-based Decision Making A Focus on Social Skills Instruction Question

  3. Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk ≈ Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) ≈ Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) PBIS Framework Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Social Skills Improvement System (SSiS) - Classwide Intervention Program ≈ Primary Prevention (Tier 1) Social Academic Behavioral

  4. What do we expect as a school from our students Academically?

  5. HO 2, pg. 1-2

  6. Academic component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  7. Academic component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  8. What do we expect as a school from our students Socially?

  9. Social Skills Expectations • What do we expect from our students socially? • Cooperation • Taking turns • Playing by the rules • Self-control Making the connection between academics, behavior and social skills

  10. School-based programs designed to promote character development of students (Person, Moiduddin, Angus, & Malone, 2009) The goal is to raise children to become morally responsible, self-disciplined citizens(Berkowitz & Bier, 2005). Social Skills programs will help teach children about basic human values including honesty, kindness, courage, equality, and respect Considerations: Evidence-based program Selected according to the 11 principles of effective character education (Lickona, Schaps, & Lewis, 2007) Implemented throughout the county to facilitate consistency Social skills (or Character Education) Component Social Skills and Character Education Component

  11. Social Skills (or Character Education) Component: Example Programs Social Skills and Character Education Component

  12. Positive Action • www.positiveaction.net • Positive Action is an evidence-based program that improves academics, behavior, and character. Positive Action uses a curriculum-based approach to effectively increase positive behaviors and decrease negative behaviors. • Social Skills (or Character Education) Component: Example Programs Social Skills and Character Education Component

  13. Behavior • Academic Achievement • Character • Attendance • Health • Family Literacy Character Education Component: Positive Action • Philosophy addresses the core of each person: “You feel good about yourself when you think and do positive actions, and there is always a positive way to do everything” (Positive Action, 2008). Positive Action: a K-12 program which aims to promote character development, academic achievement, and social-emotional skills and to reduce disruptive, problem behavior. Improves Reduces • Disciplinary problems • Absenteeism, suspensions, and truancies • Dropping out • Drug, alcohol, and tobacco use • Violence • Obesity (Positive Action, 2008)

  14. Character Education Component: What Can We Conclude About Positive Action? Social Skills component • Positive effects on elementary school students’ behavior and academic achievement (IES, 2007) • Statistically significant lower suspension rates, use of alcohol, being drunk, use of tobacco and illegal drugs (Flay, Acock, Vuchinich, & Beets, 2006) • Statistically significant lower rates of violent behavior and suspension (Flay & Allred, 2003)

  15. What roLE do students, teachers, administrators and parents Play in promoting social skills and/ or Character Development?

  16. Behavior component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  17. Behavior component

  18. Social Skills COMPONENT

  19. Social Skills COMPONENT

  20. HO 2, pg. 1-2

  21. What do we expect as a school from our students in Terms of Behavioral Performance?

  22. Area II: Behavior Behavior Component Behavior component Two-Fold 1. Reactive • Schoolwide consequences for inappropriate behaviors 2. Proactive • Clearly stated expectations • Explicitly teach expectations • Model expectations • Give students opportunities to display expectations • Provide feedback and reinforcement • Monitor behavior

  23. Common approach to discipline Clear set of positive behavioral expectations Procedures for teaching expected behavior Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior Procedures for on-going monitoring and evaluation Behavior Component Behavior component

  24. School Expectations • 3-5 Expectations • Clearly stated • Taught • Reinforced • Expectations should be explicitly defined for each school setting. • Use your Schoolwide Expectations Survey for Specific School Settings results to establish school priorities. How can we help all students meet our expectations? HO 4

  25. The Schoolwide Expectation Survey for Specific Settings What do your teachers expect? Classroom • Follow Directions 0 1 2 • Use kind words 0 1 2 • Control your temper 0 1 2 • Cooperate with others 0 1 2 • Use an inside voice 0 1 2 Respect • Arrive to class on time 0 1 2 • Remain in school for the whole day 0 1 2 • Bring your required materials 0 1 2 • Turn in finished work 0 1 2 • Exercise self-control 0 1 2 Responsibility Best Effort • Participate in class activities 0 1 2 • Complete work with best effort 0 1 2 • Ask for help politely 0 1 2

  26. East Elementary School

  27. What role do students, teachers, administrators and parents play in maintaining desired behavior?

  28. Behavior component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  29. Behavior component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  30. Behavior component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  31. Behavior component State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  32. HO 2, pg. 1-2

  33. How can we help all students meet our expectations?

  34. Teaching Faculty and Staff Students Parents and Community

  35. HO 2, pg. 3

  36. How will the school-wide expectations be taught to all stakeholders? Faculty and Staff Implementation Manual Expectation Matrix Bookmarks Team Planning Meetings Posters Ticket Tip Sheet Students Lessons (Monthly and Settings) Posters (Setting, Expectation, Tickets) Videos Parents and Community Letters to Parents Home Expectation Matrix Contacts with community businesses Procedures for teaching

  37. Elementary: Positive Behavior Support • Bus Driver Bookmark • What is a Comprehensive Model of Prevention: • It is a multi-level strategic intervention system that includes academic, social, and behavior support to all students. Based on the three school wide rules – Be Responsible, Be Respectful and Be Ready –the program outlines behavior expectations in a variety of school settings. • Purpose: • X’s program is focused on teaching and modeling, through positive reinforcement, the following traits: • Respect • Responsibility • Readiness • How do I participate? • A packet of Bear Bucks can be found attached to the bookmark. Please complete a Bear Buck for each of the appropriate student behaviors you observe throughout the day. • Responsible, Respectful, Ready!

  38. Weekly Emails Ticket Tip Sheet 6. Explain to students that they need to fill out all of the required information on the ticket in order for it to be used. 7. Once a student has earned a ticket, never take the ticket back! 8. Students should be able to earn tickets for appropriate behavior (meeting the school expectations) in various settings such as: arrival/dismissal, bus, cafeteria, hallway, playground, library, office, classroom, and specials (PE, art, etc.) 9. School-wide staff (teachers, administrators, bus drivers, custodial and culinary staff, librarians, nurse, etc.) should distribute tickets intermittently when appropriate behavior is displayed. 10. Tickets can also be used to reinforce appropriate behavior displayed in some while decreasing inappropriate behavior in others (you see a group of students walking down the hall, the first four students are talking and laughing and the others are quiet so you give the students in the back tickets and thank them for walking down the hall quietly). • When giving a ticket for positive behavior, always pair behavior specific praise. Example, “Lori, thank you for walking down the hallway with a quiet voice and your hands at your side. For showing responsibility, you have earned a PAWS ticket.” • In the first days and weeks of implementing a Positive Behavior Support system, flood students with tickets to increase effectiveness. Overtime fade tickets and provide intermittent reinforcement. • School staff should try to be consistent with ticket distribution. Portions of staff meetings can be used to discuss ticket distribution. • To ensure student buy-in, survey students to gain an understanding of what reinforcements are desired. • 5. Explicitly teach students how tickets can be earned and what tickets can be used for once they are received.

  39. TEACHING STUDENTS Procedures for teaching: students • First day of school Kick-off Assemblies • Teach setting expectations in the first two weeks of school – one lesson per setting • Videos (during school and on website) • Modeling • Posters of expectations • Posters detailing the expected behavior in each setting • Using Behavior Specific Praise • Student handbook • Back to school boot camp • Student Ambassadors for students new to the school during the year • Expectation-themed contests: Poster, Oratorical, Art

  40. East Elementary School

  41. An Instructional Approach • Positive Behavior Support at Elementary School • Cafeteria Expectations Lesson Plan • Objective: The student will demonstrate the ES cafeteria expectations (show respect to all, own my own behavior, always follow instructions, and ready to do my best) • Show Respect to All includes: • Use an inside voice. • Use manners. • Listen to and follow adult directions. • Own My Behavior includes: • Make your choices quickly. • Eat your own food. • Do not exchange food or money. • Choose a seat and stay with it. • Clean up after yourself. • Always Follow Instructions includes: • Follow cafeteria procedures • Follow the table sign. • Ready to do My Best includes: • Get all necessary items before sitting down. • Follow the table sign. • Tell • 1. Introduce the cafeteria expectations and ask questions about them. • Today we’re going to talk about ways you can show SOAR characteristics in the cafeteria. • What are some things that happen in the cafeteria that cause problems for you and for others? • How do you usually react in these situations? • What are some good ways to act in order to keep these things from happening? • 2. Define the skill and discuss the key terms. • Showing respect to all in the cafeteria means: using an inside voice, using manners, and listening to and following adult directions. • Own my behavior in the cafeteria means: Making your choices quickly, eating your own food, not exchanging food or money, choosing a seat and staying with it, and cleaning up after yourself. State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  42. Positive Behavior Support at Elementary School Cafeteria Expectations Lesson Plan continued… Tell, Show, Do • Always follow instructions in the cafeteria means: Following cafeteria procedures and following the table sign. • Ready to do my best in the cafeteria means: Getting all necessary items before sitting down and following the table sign. • 3. Discuss why this is important. • You, your friends, or adults can get hurt if we are not respectful and responsible. • If you show respect to others, they are more likely to show respect to you. • The cafeteria needs to be a place where we feel safe and enjoy time away from class. • Show/Discuss • Using one of the following situations, model, role-play, or discuss the following situations. For negative modeling, respond in one of the following ways: not listening, not following instructions, raising your voice, arguing, getting upset, and so on. For positive modeling, respond by engaging in one of the expectations above (e.g., using positive and supportive language) and encouraging other to do so as well. • Situations • An adult in the cafeteria asks you to pick up a wrapper on the floor. But you didn’t drop the wrapper, and the wrapper isn’t yours. What should you do? • You forgot to do your homework last night and had planned to do it during lunch. Unfortunately, you are the last one in the lunch line. You are in a big hurry. What should you do? • You forgot your lunch money and you are so hungry! Your “friend” says that he steals food all of the time. “It’s no big deal,” he says. You are feeling really pressured to steal, especially because you are so hungry. What should you do? • Do • Ask students to: • State the expectations. • Tell why the expectations are important. • Think of ways to help them remember the expectations when they are in the cafeteria. • Follow Through and Practice • 1. Generate and Role-Play or Discussion Situations • Invite students to generate additional situations that result in problems in the cafeteria. Role-play or discuss several of these. You may want to go into the cafeteria and re-enact some situations. • 2. Use Incidental Teaching • Whenever a conflict situation arises in the cafeteria, use that situation to review the skill.

  43. Cafeteria Expectations Show Respect to all • Use an inside voice • Use manners • Listen to and follow adult directions elementary school

  44. TEACHING PARENTS and COMMUNITY Procedures for teaching: parents and community • Back to School Night • Parent Handbook with Expectation Matrix • Email or phone call blasts • Monthly Calendar or Newsletter Updates • Character Fair (demonstration of student made projects) • Host pot-luck or community discussion groups • Thank you posters for community sponsors • Refrigerator Magnets (with Expectations) • Parenting Seminars (how to tie the school expectations to home)

  45. A Parent Letter Procedures for teaching: parents and community

  46. Teaching parents and community State of Tennessee Technical Assistance Grant IRB # 100756

  47. Thank you for helping to make Our Middle School’s Positive Behavior Support Plan a Success! Thank you posters hanging in local businesses build community awareness!

  48. HO 2, pg. 3

  49. How do we reinforce our plan? Procedures for Reinforcing