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School-wide Positive Behavior Support for Parents PowerPoint Presentation
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School-wide Positive Behavior Support for Parents

School-wide Positive Behavior Support for Parents

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School-wide Positive Behavior Support for Parents

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  1. School-wide Positive Behavior Support for Parents Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.

  2. Property of Behavior Doctor Seminars copyright 2009 – original author must be given credit Copyright Infringement • It has come to my attention that someone has been copying these slides and changing the title page and claiming them to be their own. I post these on the website to share, however, credit to the original author is not only legally required, it is socially appropriate. Violators will be contacted and dealt with via whatever means are required by the infringement. It is called plagiarism. • While the ideas in this PPT are not all original, the compiling and artwork are copyright protected. I give credit to original authors during my trainings for each of the ideas within and that is not something that one would know unless they were the originators of this PPT presentation. • For the above reason, all PPT slides are now saved in pdf format only – so it will be more difficult to change slides. • Thank you to those of you who have used these slides appropriately and I apologize to you.

  3. What does School-wide Positive Behavior Support Mean?

  4. What does a PBIS school look like? • 20-80% reduction in Office Discipline Referrals • 3-5 Behavioral Expectations are posted, taught, modeled, practiced and rewarded. • Administrator is an active participant on the PBIS team. • Continuum of behavior support is available to all students. • Children are caught being good.

  5. What does a PBIS school feel like? • Students report feeling safer • Teacher’s report higher morale and less turnover rate. • Administrative staff report having more time to deal with students on a personal level and not on a behavioral level. • Parents report feeling more positive about the school. • People look forward to Mondays, and Tuesdays, and….

  6. What does a PBIS school sound like? • Students receive at least 4 positive comments for every correction. • Students greet adults who enter the building. • Hallways are quieter. • Lunchrooms are less noisy. • Teachers are talking about academics instead of behaviors.

  7. Don’t be confused! PBIS = PBS = EBS = SWD = SWPBS

  8. Why do I always get the worst class?

  9. Why do I always get the best class?

  10. Alternative School You’re Out! jail Admin gangs

  11. Cranklin Covey Time Management Class Offered Daily Learn how to turn 24 hours into 48 hours

  12. Barnum & Bailey 101

  13. Improve literacy, math, geography, science, etc. Make schools safe, caring, & focused on teaching & learning Improve student character & citizenship Eliminate bullying Prevent drug use Least Restrictive Environment Prepare for postsecondary education Provide a free & appropriate education for all Prepare viable workforce Affect rates of high risk, antisocial behavior Leave no child behind Etc…. Competing, Inter-related National Goals

  14. A man walks up to an elevator with a lion…

  15. He’s completely harmless unless something startles him.

  16. CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE EFFECTIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  17. CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  18. Tertiary Prevention: Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE EFFECTIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  19. Spinning pyramid developed by Laura Riffel- based on the work of Drs. Sugai & Horner

  20. What about all the things we already do well? • The really nice thing about SW-PBS is that all those things you do well fit right into the whole system • This is a framework and puts a name on all those things and helps the entire staff work smarter not harder.

  21. School-Wide Systems Non Classroom Settings Classroom Systems Individual Student Support Systems

  22. Three years after leaving school, 70% of antisocial youth have been arrested (Walker, Colvin, & Ramsey, 1995) 82% of crimes are committed by people who have dropped out of school (APA Commission on Youth Violence, 1993) What happens if we do not intervene?

  23. Clamp down on rule violators. Review rules & sanctions Extend continuum of aversive consequences Improve consistency of use of punishments Establish “bottom line” Notify and confer with parents (Lombardi et al., 1990) What are our “common” responses?

  24. Situations areaversiveto us so we select interventions that: Produceimmediate relieffrom aversive Modifyphysical environment Assignresponsibilityfor change to student &/or others Reactive responses are predictable….

  25. Zero tolerance policies Security guards, student uniforms, metal detectors, video cameras Suspension/expulsion Exclusionary options (e.g., alternative programs) Typical reactive responses

  26. Fosters environments of control Occasions & reinforces antisocial behavior Shifts accountability away from school Devalues child-adult relationship Weakens relationship between academic & social behavior programming Research does not support effectiveness But….false sense of safety/security!

  27. Reviews of over 600 studies on how to reduce school discipline problems indicate that the LEAST effective responses to school violence are: Talking Therapies Psychotherapy Punishment associated with INCREASED aggression, vandalism, truancy, tardiness, & dropouts (Elliott, Hamburg & Williams, 1998; Gottfredson, 1996; Lipsey, 1991, 1992; Mayer, 1995; Mayer & Sulzer-Azeroff, 1990; Tolan & Guerra, 1994) What doesn’t work

  28. What Gives Bob? I’ve been collecting the data and you’ve been in the shower for three days man. Help ME! Help ME! Bob is stuck in the vicious loop of shampoo bottle directions: Lather, Rinse , Repeat. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

  29. Lined Up I.S.S

  30. Dolphin Cove- Dunleith Elementary

  31. “What them kids need….(sic)” 23 states still have no ban on corporal punishment… US Dept of Education: Office of Civil Rights

  32. State Rank vs. Corporal Punishment Top ten for paddling Not outlawed States unnamed to protect the innocent

  33. What does work • Same research reviews indicate that the MOST effective response to school violence is a comprehensive approach that includes: • social skills training • academic restructuring • behavioral interventions

  34. Challenge: How do schools achieve capacity to… • Respondeffectively, efficiently, & relevantlyto range of problem behaviors observed in schools • Engage inteam-based problem solving • Adopt, fit, &sustain research-based behavioral practices • Give priority tounified agenda of prevention

  35. Major Ideas for Effective PBIS • 1. Invest in Prevention • Teach, Model, Practice, Monitor and Reward before resorting to punishment and exclusion. • Focus first on the social culture of the school • 2. Work Smarter • Combine rather than add initiatives • Work smarter

  36. 3. Create durable “Systems of Support” • Select different systems based on the nature of the problem • 4. Prepare an implementation plan to “fit” the unique characteristics of your school. • Self-assessment • Different paths -- common outcomes • 5. Gather and use information for on-going decision-making

  37. Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making SYSTEMS DATA OUTCOMES Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Staff Behavior PRACTICES

  38. School-Wide Systems 1. Commonpurpose& approach to discipline 2. Clear set ofpositive expectations & behaviors 3. Procedures forteachingexpected behavior 4. Continuum of procedures forencouragingexpected behavior 5. Continuum of procedures fordiscouraging inappropriate behavior 6. Procedures for on-goingmonitoring& evaluation

  39. For all students, across all settings Guidelines: Keep to 5 or fewer State positively Use common & few words Why? Consistent communications Consistent language School-wide Behavior Expectations

  40. Miss Mutner Liked to Go Over a Few of her rules... No talking No running No sneezing No betting No looking out the window No dorky hairstyles No coughing No laughing No fighting No swearing No sleeping No being a dork No making fun of teacher No flipping of fingers No drugs No weapons No bringing animals to school No looking at the clock No looking out the window No stupid remarks No coming in late No coming in early No humming No gum chewing No gum popping No sneering No spitting No farting No whistling No rolling your eyes No clicking of teeth No moving of feet under desk No fainting No sickness No going to the bathroom off schedule No crying No snot sucking No talking No running No sneezing No betting No looking out the window No dorky hairstyles No coughing No laughing No fighting No swearing No sleeping No being a dork No making fun of teacher No flipping of fingers No drugs No weapons No bringing animals to school No looking at the clock No looking out the window No stupid remarks

  41. 3 R’s for Centreville Middle School Be Respectful. Be Responsible. Be Resourceful. School-wide Behavior Expectations Example:

  42. Be obedient. No fighting. No drugs or weapons on the property. Act responsibly. School-wide Behavior ExpectationsNonexample:

  43. PAWS Be Prompt. Accept responsibility. Work Hard. Show respect. School-wide Behavior Expectations Example:

  44. Litmus Test • Would you write them up if they did the opposite? • Is it something they are capable of exhibiting in observable terms? (Does it show an action?) • Can you visualize what it looks like done well?

  45. Fern Ridge Middle School’s “High Five” Be respectful. Be responsible. Be there and ready. Keep hands and feet to yourself. Follow adult directions the first time. School-wide Behavior Expectations Example:

  46. 3-5 BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS RESPECT *SELF *OTHERS *PROPERTY

  47. 3 Rs Respect Yourself Respect Others Respect Property