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School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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  1. School-wide Positive Behavior Support PBS Coaches’ Training April 16th, 2004 Florida’s Positive Behavior Support Project University of South Florida

  2. New Coaches - AM • Overview of School-wide PBS • Role of a Coach

  3. Truth or Myth? • T , MPBS incorporates a data-decision making process. • T, MPBS encourages positive reinforcement for appropriate behaviors, and ignoring inappropriate behaviors. • T , M PBS is only for students who are ESE or are having severe behavior difficulties. • T, M An outcome of school-wide PBS is a decrease in the amount of time spent on discipline referrals, thus, increasing amount of instructional time. • T, M PBS focuses on being proactive and educative. • T, M PBS is only for schools that have a high rate of out-of school suspensions and/or absenteeism. • T, M PBS is a program that tells you want consequences to give for inappropriate behaviors. • T,M PBS takes away the principal’s power to make decisions for their school.

  4. Positive Behavior Support… • Is a collaborative, assessment-based approach to developing effective interventions for problem behavior • Emphasizes the use of proactive, educative, and reinforcement-based strategies to achieve meaningful and durable behavior and lifestyle outcomes • Aims to build effective environments in which positive behavior is more effective than problem behavior

  5. Levels of PBSAdapted from Levels and Descriptions of Behavior Support(George, Harrower, & Knoster, 2003) • School-wide –intended for all students, staff, in specific settings and across campus • Classroom –reflect school-wide expectations for student behavior coupled with pre-planned strategies applied within classrooms • Targeted Group – addressing students who are at-risk for school failure, or display a chronic pattern of inappropriate behavior that do not respond to school-wide interventions • Individual Student –reflect school-wide expectations for student behavior coupled with team-based strategies to address problematic behaviors of individual students

  6. Designing Comprehensive Systems CONTINUUM OF POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT (PBS) Adapted from the Center for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (2002)

  7. 2001-2002 Academic Year Center for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (2002)

  8. Center for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (2002)

  9. Center for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (2002)

  10. Educating an Increasing Population of Heterogeneous Students: • English as a second language • Limited family supports • Significant learning and/or behavioral problems • Families who face financial barriers • Families with a great need for mental health, social welfare, medical, and vocational assistance

  11. Educating Students with Problem Behavior • Challenges are increasing • these students represent only 1-5% of school enrollment • they account for over 50% of behavioral incidents • they consume significant amounts of time • these students require comprehensive behavioral supports that involve family, school, and community participation

  12. Discipline by Definition13th centuryhttp://www.m-w.com/dictionary.htm • Main Entry: 1dis·ci·plinePronunciation: 'di-s&-pl&nDate: 13th century • 1: PUNISHMENT • 2obsolete: INSTRUCTION • 3: a field of study • 4: training that corrects, molds, or perfects the mental faculties or moral character

  13. Do We Really Want to Trust Our Luck? In 1999, 1,763 youths under the age of 18 were arrested for homicide in the United States (National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center, 2000) 17% of all arrest in 1999 involved a juvenile under the age of 18. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin, 2000) Students who are behaviorally and emotionally challenged have the lowest promotion and highest drop out rates. In 1998, among youth ages 10 to 19 in the U.S., there were 2,054 suicides. Suicide was the third leading cause of death for that age group.(National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center, 2000)

  14. “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……..... ……….teach? ………punish?” “Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” (John Herner ,1998)

  15. Traditional Discipline: Focused on the student’s problem behavior Goal was to stop undesirable behavior, through the use of punishment. Positive Behavior Support: Replaces undesired behavior with a new behavior or skill. Alters environments, Teaches appropriate skills, and rewards appropriate behavior. Traditional Discipline vs. PBS

  16. Philosophical Shift… • Educators now recognize that some students DO NOT have the skills and behavioral repertories necessary to cope with the many academic and social expectations in schools • Researchers have determined that careful examination of curriculum may identify academic, social, and behavioral expectations that are associated with occurrences and nonoccurrence's of problem behavior in students Kern, Delaney, Clark, Dunlap, and Childs; 2001

  17. Major Elements • Establish a team/faculty buy-in • Establish a data-based decision-making system • Modify discipline referral process/forms • Refine consequences • Establish expectations & rules • Develop lesson plans & teach • Create a reward/incentives program • Monitor, evaluate, and modify

  18. Overview of School-wide PBS

  19. Comprehensive PBS is… • Total staff commitment to managing behavior • Clearly defined and communicated expectations and rules • Consequences and clearly stated procedures for correcting rule-breaking behaviors • An instructional component for teaching students self-control, expected behaviors, and social skills strategies

  20. Features of School-wide PBS(Sugai, 2001) • Create a continuum of behavior supports from a systems perspective • Focus on behavior of adults in school as unit • Establish behavioral competence • Utilize effective, efficient & relevant data-based decision-making systems • Give priority to academic success • Invest in research-validated practices • Arrange environment for “working smarter”

  21. Elementary (600-900) Discipline referrals per day are >3 More than 35% of the students have at least one referral in an academic year Average office discipline referrals per student is >1.5 Middle/Jr. High (800-1200) Discipline referrals per day are >10 More than 35% of students have at least one referral in an academic year Average office discipline referrals per student is >2.5 School-wide Systems are Warranted if: (Center for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS), University of Oregon, 2001)

  22. E Elementary 33% overall reduction in ODRs when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  23. M Elementary 61% overall reduction in ODRs when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  24. T Elementary 69% overall reduction in ODRs when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  25. T Elementary

  26. C Middle School 29% reduction in Level III, 50% reduction in Level IV, and 79% reduction in SESIR offenses when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  27. C Middle School 29% reduction in Level III, 50% reduction in Level IV, and 79% reduction in SESIR offenses when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  28. C Middle School 73% overall reduction in fights when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  29. K-12 Alt/Center School 32% overall reduction in ODRs when comparing Year 1 implementation to baseline

  30. K-12 Alt/Center School

  31. K-5 Center School

  32. TCHS Monthly Discipline Referrals (Levels 1 & 2)Comparison of 2001-2002, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004

  33. TCHS Monthly Discipline Referrals (Levels 3 & 4)Comparison of 2001-2002, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004

  34. TCHS Yearly Discipline Referrals Per 100 StudentsComparison of 2001-2002, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004 **2003-2004 yearly data estimated based on number of refferals for Aug. –Oct.

  35. Level 1 & 2 Referrals Per Problem Behavior

  36. Level 3 & 4 Referrals Per Problem Behavior

  37. Summary of Discipline Data:Behavior Change • Average # of ODRs per day from 6 schools in Florida: • 2001-2002: 3.72 per a day • 2002-2003: 2.72 per a day • 7 out of 8 Schools had a decrease in ODRs • These 7 schools averaged 29 % decrease in ODRs during first year of implementation (2001-2002) • ODR = office discipline referral

  38. School Grades For 25 Schools in the State of Florida: • 48% increased their letter grade by at least one level • 36% maintained their letter grade • 20% preserved their “A” letter grade • Overall, 84% increased or maintained their letter grade • 7 schools did not receive grades due to being a center or new school

  39. Achievement Data:Learning Gains Out of 25 Schools in the State of Florida: • 22 schools increased the % of their students meeting high standards in reading; average increase 5.72% • 21 schools increased the % of their students meeting high standards in math; average increase 4% • 15 schools increased the % of their students meeting high standards in writing; average increase 6.96%

  40. Achievement Data:Learning Gains Out of 25 Schools in the State of Florida: • 19 schools increased the % of their students making learning gains in reading; average increase 7.52% • 15 schools increased the % of their students making learning gains in math; average increase 1.36% • 18 schools increased the % of their lowest 25% making learning gains in reading; average increase 5.12%

  41. In Summary,The Process For School-wide PBS Includes… • A clearly stated, positive purpose • Set of positively stated behavior expectations • Procedures for teaching school-wide expectations • Continuum of procedures for encouraging students to display expected behaviors • A continuum of procedures for discouraging violations of school-wide expectations • Method of monitoring implementation and effectiveness

  42. Results of School-wide PBS • When PBS strategies are implemented school-wide, students with and without disabilities benefit by having an environment that is conducive to learning • All individuals (students, staff, teachers, parents) learn more about their own behavior, learn to work together, and support each other as a community of learners

  43. Teaming and Collaboration

  44. Have you ever been part of this team? • No agenda is prepared • Meeting starts late • No time schedule has been set for the meeting • No one is prepared • No facilitator is identified • No one agrees on anything • No action plan is developed • Everyone is off task • Negative tone throughout the meeting

  45. Establishing a Foundation for Collaboration and Operation • Necessary first step • Without this many schools cannot sustain long-term change

  46. Ingredients for Successful Teams • Mutual trust and respect • Shared goals and objectives • Open communication • Effective conflict resolution • Equity of task distribution • Consensus decision-making • Ongoing problem-solving

  47. Critical Questions • Critical questions that need to be addressed • Who should be included? • What guidelines will the team follow? • What contributions will each person make? • Who will perform which roles? • How do we resolve conflict?

  48. 26 35 37 31 36 39 38 26 24 Teaming Activity Below is a very special grid, around each shaded number are 8 white squares. However, each white square should have a number of 1 to 7. Once filled in, these 8 numbers will sum to the shaded number. In addition, once completed correctly, no row nor column will contain a duplicate number within a white square. For example, the top row may be 5 6 4 2 3 1 7, etc. www.brainbashers.com/progs/

  49. 2 1 3 5 6 4 7 6 26 5 35 3 37 1 1 2 6 3 4 7 5 4 31 2 36 7 39 6 3 6 7 2 5 1 4 5 38 4 26 1 24 2 7 5 1 4 2 6 3 Teaming Activity Answer Key www.brainbashers.com/progs/

  50. Anything I can do, We can do better • Individual contributions • Team contributions • Different perspectives • Looking at things objectively • Productivity • Accuracy • Consensus