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School-wide Positive Behavior Support

School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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  1. School-wide Positive Behavior Support Rob Horner and George Sugai University of Oregon and University of Connecticut OSEP TA Center on Positive Behavior Support www.pbis.org www.swis.org

  2. Assumptions and Goals • School teams are on the path to implementation of school-wide PBS. • Goals • Review core features of School-wide PBS • Link behavioral and academic supports • Define the role of “behavioral function” • Provide foundation for supports at “yellow” and “red” parts of triangle.

  3. What isSchool-wide Positive Behavior Support? • School-wide PBS is: • A systems approach for establishing the social culture and individualized behavioral supports needed for schools to be effective learning environments for all students. • Evidence-based features of SW-PBS • Prevention • Define and teach positive social expectations • Acknowledge positive behavior • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making • Continuum of intensive, individual interventions. • Administrative leadership – Team-based implementation (Systems that support effective practices)

  4. Establishing a Social Culture Common Language MEMBERSHIP Common Experience Common Vision/Values

  5. Six Major Ideas of School-wide Positive Behavior Support • 1. Invest in a Prevention Foundation • Build a culture of social competence • Define, teach, monitor, and reward appropriate behavior • Define, monitor and correct inappropriate behavior • 2. Build Multiple Levels of Behavior Support • Three-tiered model (do not rely on one trick for all problems) • 3. Start with Commitment, Team, Administrative Support • Top 3 Goals, Administrator on team, 80% commitment • Team-based implementation • 4. Establish the Systems that support effective practices • No new resources (working smarter) • 5. Adapt procedures to “fit” the context • Implement sustainable practices and systems • 6.Collect and use information for decision-making

  6. School-wide Systems(All students all settings all times) Create a positive school culture: School environment is predictable 1. common language 2. common vision (understanding of expectations) 3. common experience (everyone knows) School environment is positive regular recognition for positive behavior School environment is safe violent and disruptive behavior is not tolerated School environment is consistent adults use similar expectations.

  7. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings  ~80% of Students 27

  8. Four Basic Recommendations: • Never stop doing what is already working • Always look for the smallest change that will produce the largest effect • Avoid defining a large number of goals • Do a small number of things well • Do not add something new without also defining what you will stop doing to make the addition possible. • Collect and use data for decision-making

  9. National Trends • School-wide PBS is becoming the norm. • 5300 schools across the nation • Achieving academic outcomes requires attention to the social culture and behavior supports available in schools. • High school • Intensive behavior support • Academic/Behavior support integration • Learning how to go to scale

  10. Improving Schools

  11. Main Message STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Effective Instruction Behavior Support Increasing District & State Competency and Capacity Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and Systems

  12. PBIS 46% Lower PBIS 38% Lower N = 17 N = 26 N = 73 N = 59

  13. ODR/100 1.13 .51 .39 .08 TIC Total 76% 82% 82% 88%

  14. Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%