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Generations

Generations

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Generations

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  1. Generations An Overview of Generational Behavior, Attitudes, and Leadership The Open Classroom Spring 2010

  2. Familial Generation • Average time between a mother’s first offspring and her daughter’s first offspring • U.S. (2007) 25.2 years • U.K. (2004) 27.4 years

  3. Cultural Generation • Cohorts of people who were born in the same date range and share similar cultural experience • Impact of technology, economy, ecological change on mind set of a generation – during a cohort’s formative years (between childhood and adulthood) • Karl Mannheim emphasized that the rapidity of social change in youth was crucial to the formation of generations • In periods of rapid social change, a generation would be much more likely to develop a cohesive character

  4. Western World Generations (I) • The “Lost Generation” – Generation of 1914 in Europe (Gertrude Stein) – those who fought in WWI • The “Greatest Generation” – Veterans of WW II (Tom Brokaw) • The “Silent Generation” (1925-1945) – Children of the Great Depression

  5. Western World Generations (II) • The “Baby Boom Generation” – (1946-1964) By share numbers, remodeled society • Rejection of traditional values • Associated with privilege & affluence

  6. Western World Generations (III) • Generation X – Baby Bust Generation (1965-1979) • Generation Y (Millennials) (Echo boomers) (Mid-1970s-early 2000s) • Generation Z – Internet Generation “Digital Natives” (Early 1990s -)

  7. Eastern World Generations (China) • The Post-80s (China’s Generation Y) (born 1980-1989) • “Little Emperors” (One Child Policy) • Optimism for the future; newfound consumerism and entrepreneurship

  8. Eastern World Generations (Korea) • Defined around the democratization of the country • “Democratization Generation” • “June 3, 1987 Generation” – witnessed the June uprising • “April 19 Generation” – struggled against Syngman Rhee regime in 1960

  9. Eastern World Generations (India) • Independence in 1947 was a watershed in terms of generations • People born in the 1930s and 1940s tended to be loyal to the new state • Indian “Boomers” – born after independence and into the early 1960s – tended to link success to leaving India and were suspicious of traditional values and institutions • Generation X have seen an improvement in India’s economy • Generation Y continues this pattern

  10. Strauss-Howe Generational Theory • William Strauss/Neil Howe • Generations (1991) • The Fourth Turning (1997) • American history as a series of generational biographies going back to 1584 • Examine changes in human attitudes and behavior and in social mood

  11. A “Generation” Shares: • Age Location in History – encounter key historical events and social trends during the same phase of life • Shared Beliefs and Behaviors • Perceived Membershipin that generation

  12. Two Different Types of Eras • Crises • Marked by social upheaval (e.g. Great Depression, WWII) • Awakenings • Marked by cultural or religious renewal (e.g. Consciousness Revolution of the 1960s) • Ethic of Individualism/new spiritual agendas

  13. Generational Cycles (Strauss-Howe) • About every 70-90 years – the length of a human life – a national Crisis occurs in American society • American Revolution (1770s/1780s) • American Civil War (1860s) • Great Depression (1930s) • Great Recession (2000s) • Roughly halfway to the next Crisis, a cultural Awakening occurs – Revitalization Movement

  14. Generational Archetypes • Generations that come of age as young adults during a Crisis or an Awakening directly absorb the lessons of that defining era and carry these lessons forward in their attitudes and behaviors later in life (Dominant Generations) • Generations that grow up as children during a Crisis or an Awakening take a dependent role during the defining era, which shapes their later attitudes and behavior very differently (Recessive Generations)

  15. Each Archetype shares: • an age-location in history • some basic attitudes toward family, risk, culture, values, and civic engagement • Share collective personas and follow similar life-trajectories

  16. Historical Generations • Arthurian Generation (1433-1460) • Humanist Generation (1461-1482) • Reformation Generation (1483-1511) • Reprisal Generation (1512-1540) • Elizabethan Generation (1541-1565) • Parliamentary Generation (1566-1587) • Puritan generation (1588-1617) • Cavalier Generation (1618-1647) • Glorious Generation (1648-1673) • Enlightenment Generation (1674-1700) • Awakening Generation (1701-1723)

  17. Historical Generations (II) • Liberty generation (1724-1741) • Republican generation (1742-1766) • Compromise Generation (1767-1791) • Transcendental Generation (1792-1821) • Gilded Generation (1822-1842) • Progressive generation (1843-1859) • Missionary Generation (1860-1882) • Lost Generation (1883–1900) • G.I. Generation (1901–1924) • Silent Generation (1925–1942) • (Baby) Boom Generation (1943–1960) • 13th Generation (Gen X) (1961–1981) • Millennial Generation (Gen Y) (1982–2004) • Homeland Generation (Gen Z) (2005-?)

  18. Generational Archetypes:IDEALIST (Prophet) • Born after a Crisis during a time of rejuvenated community life around a new social order • Grow up as the increasingly indulged children of this post-Crisis era, come of age as self-absorbed young crusaders of an Awakening • Focus on morals • Values-oriented elder leadership • Sam Adams, Ben Franklin, Abraham Lincoln, Herbert Hoover, Franklin Roosevelt • Baby Boomers (1946-1964)

  19. Generational Archetypes:Reactive (Prophet) • Born during an Awakening, a time of social ideals and spiritual agendas • Young adults passionately attack the established institutional order • Grow up as under-protected children and come of age as alienated post-Awakening adults • Pragmatic midlife leaders during a crisis/grow into resilient post-Crisis elders • Liberty, Survival, Honor • George Washington, John Adams, Ulysses Grant, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower • Generation X (1965-1979)

  20. Generational Archetypes:Civic (Hero) • Born after an Awakening during a time of individual pragmatism, self-reliance, and laissez-faire • Grow up as increasingly protected post-Awakening children, come of age as team-oriented young optimists during a crisis, emerge as energetic, overly-confident mid-lifers, and politically powerful elders • Community, Affluence, and Technology • Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan • Millenials (1980-2000)

  21. Generational Archetypes:Adaptive (Artist) • Born during a Crisis, a time when great dangers cut down social and political complexity in favor of public consensus, aggressive institutions, and an ethic of personal sacrifice • Grow up overprotected by adults preoccupied with the Crisis, come of age as the socialized and conformist young adults of a post-Crisis world, process-oriented mid-lifers, and thoughtful post-Awakening elders • Expertise, Due Process • John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson • Silent Generation (1925-1945)

  22. America’s Current Position (Howe) • As Boomers replace the Silent Generation as elder leaders, they will reject caution and compromise and act on moral absolutes • As Gen Xers replace Boomers in Mid-Life, they will apply a new pragmatic survivalism to management decisions • As Millenials replace Gen Xers in young adulthood, they will revitalize community, social discipline, and public purpose