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Zane Starr (zcs), GeetaShroff (gshroff), Brian Loo (bloo), Priya Narasimhan (priya) PowerPoint Presentation
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Zane Starr (zcs), GeetaShroff (gshroff), Brian Loo (bloo), Priya Narasimhan (priya)

Zane Starr (zcs), GeetaShroff (gshroff), Brian Loo (bloo), Priya Narasimhan (priya)

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Zane Starr (zcs), GeetaShroff (gshroff), Brian Loo (bloo), Priya Narasimhan (priya)

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  1. LINS : Localized Information Navigation System Zane Starr (zcs), GeetaShroff (gshroff), Brian Loo (bloo), Priya Narasimhan (priya) Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~ece549/spring07/team9/index.html What is LINS? LINS Architecture • LINS: Localized Information Navigation System • Indoor navigation system that uses localized contextual information to dynamically adapt to individual user needs • Motivation: • Many situations exist where context is critical to the user’s successful or timely arrival • Goals: • Improve quality of indoor navigation systems • Contribute to the field of accessibility research • Provide a platform for collaborative for local information sharing • Admin-side Application: • Map planning • i-Node placement • Provides initial context • i-Map storage • User-side Application: • i-Map retrieval • Contextual path planning • Allows for user preferences • Allows for information sharing • Applications: • Navigation of the blind • Emergency responders • Physically challenged • Guided grocery shopping • Self-guided tours An Implementation of LINS What is an i-Node? An information node (i-Node) is any device or item that can provide a unique identification number to the user’s mobile device • Admin-side features • Persistent storage of multimedia context for i-Node • Easy to use graphical interface • Scalable in size of deployment area • User-side features: • Add multimedia content to i-Node • Voice navigation prompts • Small memory footprint Demo of admin side application Demo of user side application on PDA Demonstrating the reading of an i-Node labeled as a fire alarm Hardware used in our implementation Context = Localized + Personal Information Results & Future Work • Where does context come from? • Admin provides initial context: • Example: Admin adds gender label to relevant information nodes (restroom). • User provides preferences: • Example: User selects gender preference • How is context used? • User preference creates context-based heuristic or cost function • Examples: Shortest path, accessibility-centric, etc. Conclusion: Using localized information to provide context for our indoor navigation provides better quality paths to the user. Future Work: We look forward to improving the localized information framework to enhance the current implementation to incorporate richer multimedia for a better experience. How does context fit into path planning? A* path planning algorithm dynamically adapts to user preference heuristics and cost functions In the above scenario, the wheel chair accessibility preference was selected. The shortest accessible route was then generated as the navigable path. This path is longer than the normal shortest path.