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Responsiveness to Intervention & School-wide Positive Behavior Support

Responsiveness to Intervention & School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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Responsiveness to Intervention & School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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  1. Responsiveness to Intervention & School-wide Positive Behavior Support George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut Sep 22 2010 www.pbis.orgwww.cber.orgwww.swis.org

  2. 10 My Worry“Teaching” by Getting Tough Runyon: “I hate this f____ing school, & you’re a dumbf_____.” Teacher: “That is disrespectful language. I’m sending you to the office so you’ll learn never to say those words again….starting now!”

  3. Immediate & seductive solution….”Get Tough!” • Clamp down & increase monitoring • Re-re-re-review rules • Extend continuum & consistency of consequences • Establish “bottom line” ...Predictable individual response

  4. Reactive responses are predictable…. When we experience aversive situation, we want select interventions that produce immediate relief • Remove student • Remove ourselves • Modify physical environment • Assign responsibility for change to student &/or others

  5. When behavior doesn’t improve, we “Get Tougher!” • Zero tolerance policies • Increased surveillance • Increased suspension & expulsion • In-service training by expert • Alternative programming …..Predictable systems response!

  6. 12 Erroneous assumption that student… • Is inherently “bad” • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of “aversives” • Will be better tomorrow…….

  7. But….false sense of safety/security! • Fosters environments of control • Triggers & reinforces antisocial behavior • Shifts accountability away from school • Devalues child-adult relationship • Weakens relationship between academic & social behavior programming

  8. Science of behavior has taught us that students…. • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors” • Do NOT learn when presented contingent aversive consequences ……..Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback

  9. 13 VIOLENCE PREVENTION • Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001) • Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning (Greenberg et al., 2003) • Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006) • White House Conference on School Violence (2006) • Positive, predictable school-wide climate • High rates of academic & social success • Formal social skills instruction • Positive active supervision & reinforcement • Positive adult role models • Multi-component, multi-year school-family-community effort

  10. PURPOSE Describe school-wide positive behavior supports (aka PBIS) in Response to Intervention context.

  11. SWPBS Features

  12. SWPBS is

  13. Integrated Elements Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES 15 Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  14. Stolen w/ permission from MN Jan 28, 2010 Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES DATA Supporting Decision Making SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior & Implementation Fidelity PRACTICES Evidence-based, preventive

  15. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT FEW ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% SOME Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings 23 ALL ~80% of Students

  16. RtI

  17. Responsiveness to Intervention

  18. Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Responsiveness to Intervention Academic Systems Behavioral Systems 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90% Circa 1996

  19. 23 RTI Continuum of Support for ALL Few Some All Dec 7, 2007

  20. Continuum of Support for ALL Math Science Spanish Reading Soc skills Soc Studies Basketball Label behavior…not people Dec 7, 2007

  21. Continuum of Support for ALL Anger man. Prob Sol. Ind. play Adult rel. Attend. Coop play Peer interac Label behavior…not people Dec 7, 2007

  22. ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS • TERTIARY PREVENTION • Function-based support • Wraparound • Person-centered planning ~5% ~15% • SECONDARY PREVENTION • Check in/out • Targeted social skills instruction • Peer-based supports • Social skills club • PRIMARY PREVENTION • Teach SW expectations • Proactive SW discipline • Positive reinforcement • Effective instruction • Parent engagement ~80% of Students

  23. 17 SWPBS Practices School-wide Classroom • Smallest # • Evidence-based • Biggest, durable effect Family Non-classroom Student

  24. “Is SWPBS evidence-based practice?” Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (in press). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality. www.pbis.org

  25. Team 35 GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started” Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  26. SWPBS Implementation Blueprint www.pbis.org

  27. 58 2. NATURAL CONTEXT 1. SOCIAL SKILL Expectations 3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

  28. 1. SOCIAL SKILL 2. NATURAL CONTEXT Expectations 3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

  29. Pre Sustained impact is real success Post

  30. ODR Admin. BenefitSpringfield MS, MD Increased minutes for administrators be instructional leaders 2001-2002 2277 2002-2003 1322 = 955 42% improvement = 14,325 min. @15 min. = 238.75 hrs = 40 days Admin. time

  31. ODR Instruc. BenefitSpringfield MS, MD Increased minutes for academic engagement & opportunities to respond 2001-2002 2277 2002-2003 1322 = 955 42% improvement = 42,975 min. @ 45 min. = 716.25 hrs = 119 days Instruc. time

  32. Bob Algozzine NC Positive Behavior Support Initiative Schools w/ Low ODRs & High Academic Outcomes Proportion of Students Meeting State Academic Standard Office Discipline Referrals per 100 Students PBIS in North Carolina

  33. Elementary School Suspension Rate PBIS in Virginia

  34. Elementary School Improvements in behavior can be associated with improvements in academic outcomes PBIS in Virginia

  35. Decreasing high risk behavior by using evidence-based curriculum (RtI) PBIS in Vermont

  36. 05% 20% 11% 22% 84% 58%

  37. Effective Social & AcademicSchool Culture Common Language Effective Practice Kids Benefit Common Experience Common Vision/Values