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  1. Before Reading_Main Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 1. A Survey 2. Listening Comprehension Mortimer J. Adler Rembrandt 3. Background Information John Deway Robert Maynard Hutchins Mr. Vallee “Paradise Lost” “Gone with the Wind” 4. Warm-up Questions

  2. Before Reading_A survey Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading A Survey Directions: Here is a survey about “Young People’s Attitudes towards Reading”. Below are the results from the survey conducted by Mori of Nestle Family Monitor. The results are based on questionnaires completed by over 900 teenagers at 33 state and independent schools and 6 colleges between March and May in 2003. Do teenagers read? Examples: Eighty-three percent read in spare time. Eleven percent never read outside of school hours (these students were more likely to come from a home where neither parent nor guardian worked). Sixteen percent boys never read in their spare time compared to only seven percent girls.

  3. Before Reading_A survey2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading What makes young people want to read? Forty-three percent will read something as a result of a peer recommendation. Ten percent will read something if it is recommended by a teacher. Fifteen percent are keen to read a book about a film they enjoy. Twenty-three percent say they will read a book about a famous person they are interested in or as ahobby (this figure is higher for boys).

  4. Before Reading_1_other results Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Other results: Age from 13 to 14 is a key periodwhere an interest in reading dwindles. Seventy percent say they will prefer to watch TV or a DVD than read a book. On the whole, girls are more enthusiastic about reading than boys. Boys are “significantly more likely than girls to say that they are encouraged to read if the book is about a place, subject or hobby in which they are interested”.

  5. Before Reading_1_other results2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Directions: Try to do such kind of survey in different classes. Use the statistics you get to analyze their attitudes towards reading. Then report your results orally to the whole class. Your preferred places for recreational reading (multi-choices)

  6. Before Reading_1_other results3 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Sources of books you read in the last 12 months

  7. Before Reading_1_other results4 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading What type of books do you consume?

  8. Before Reading_mortimer j adler Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Mortimer J. Adler Directions: Listen to the passage and finish the exercise. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Adler was an He got his Ph.D. from He taught in University of Chicago from He organized an adult discussion group program in He edited Great Books of the Western World in He became director of planning for the 15th edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica in ________________. educator and writer Columbia University ________________. 1930 until 1952 ________________. ________. 1946 ________. 1952 ________. 1969

  9. Before Reading_mortimer j adler2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading M. J. Adler (1902~2001) is an American educator and writer. Born in New York City and graduated from Columbia University (Ph. D., 1928), he taught philosophy and philosophy of law at the University of Chicago from 1930 until 1952, when he founded and became director of the Institute for Philosophical Research in San Francisco. With Robert Hutchins, Adler organized in 1946 an adult discussion group program centered on the “Great Books” of the past and edited Great Books of the Western World (54 volumes, 1952). Adler also edited the two-volume index and guide to the ideas in Great Books. In 1969 he became director of planning for the 15th edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica which was published in 1974. ■

  10. Before Reading_rembrandt Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Rembrandt Directions: Listen to the passage and fill in the words that you hear. Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was born into an that was conducive to . After years of war and upheaval (动乱), life in the United Provinces of the Netherlands was renowned for its tranquility (宁静). Rembrandt’s father was a miller and his mother was the daughter of a baker. The van Rijns were Calvinists. In the year of the artist’s birth, Leiden, his hometown, was known as one of intellectual and artistic centers in the country. __________ atmosphere ________ creativity prosperous _________ __________ principal ■

  11. Before Reading_rembrandt2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

  12. Before Reading_India_ National Flag Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading John Deway (1859~1952), American philosopher and educator Achievement: His educational psychology and philosophy had a great influence on educational development.

  13. Before Reading_India_ Robert maynard hutchins Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Robert Maynard Hutchins (1899~1977), American educator. Achievements: • Famous for his unconventional theories about higher education • President of the University of Chicago in 1929 at the age of 30 • Remained president until 1945 • Chairman of the board for the 15th edition of Encyclopaedia • Britannica published in 1974

  14. Before Reading_India_ Mr.Vallee Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Mr. Vallee (1901~1986), American singer of popular music who enjoyed fame in the 1920’s

  15. Before Reading_India_ Paradise lost Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading “Paradise Lost”: an epic poem by John Milton (1608~1674), first printed in 1667.

  16. Before Reading_India_ Gone with the wind Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading “Gone with the Wind” • A romantic novel of Georgia during the American Civil War and Reconstruction • Written by the American author Margaret Mitchell • (1900~1949) • Published in 1936 • Awarded a Pulitzer Prize

  17. Before Reading_India_ Warm-up Questions Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Warm-up Questions 1) What kind of books do you like? 2) How do you read a book? 3) Do you have any suggestions on how to become an efficient reader?

  18. Globe Reading_main Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Scanning 3. True or False 4. Further Understanding For Part 1 Question and Answer For Part 2 Multiple Choice For Part 3 Question and Answer For Part 4 Chart Completion

  19. Globe Reading._Part Division of the text1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Part Division of the Text Parts Lines Main Ideas Readers are persuaded to “write between the lines.” 1 1~4 5~34 2 Two ways of owing a book, and three kinds of book owners 3 35~85 Detailed reasons for marking up a book 4 86~112 The writer’s way to mark a book

  20. Globe Reading._scanning Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Scanning Directions: Scan this part and try to find out the following proper names and think about what these words might stand for. Proper Names Location What they stand for L. 29 Paradise Lost an epic poem by John Milton L. 30 a great Dutch painter and graphic artist Rembrandt a romantic novel of Georgia during the Civil War and Reconstruction, written by the American author Margaret Mitchell Gone with the Wind L. 50 John Dewey L. 56 American philosopher, educator, and author L. 57 American singer and orchestra leader Mr. Vallee

  21. Globe Reading._True or False1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading True or False 1. You can’t read most efficiently if you don’t “write between the lines”. ( ) T 2. As soon as you have bought a book, the book belongs to you. () F This act of purchase is only the prelude to possession. Full ownership comes only when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it is by writing in it. 3. According to the author, books should not be kept as clean and shiny as the day they were bought. ( ) T

  22. Globe Reading._ True or False2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 4. According to the author, you can mark up any books that belong to you. () F You had better not mark up a beautifully printed book or an elegantly bound edition. 5. Marking up a book while reading can keep you from dozing off. ( ) T 6. Books should be read in a state of relaxation. () F The books you read for pleasure can be read in a state of relaxation, and nothing is lost. But a book, rich in ideas and beauty, a book that raises and tries to answer great fundamental questions, demands the most active reading of which you are capable.

  23. Globe Reading._ True or False3 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 7. Your reading is active when you have filled the pages of the book with your notes. ( ) T 8. Reading a book is somewhat like having a conversation with the author. ( ) T 9. Learning means absorbing whatever you are exposed to on the subject. () F Learning doesn’t consist in being an empty receptacle. The learner has to question himself and question the teacher. 9. By “marking a book”, the author only means writing in the margin of the pages. () F There are all kinds of devices for marking a book intelligently and fruitfully.

  24. Globe Reading._Questions and Answers Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Question and Answer What makes the most efficient reading? Read “between the lines” and write “between the lines” make the most efficient reading.

  25. KEY Globe Reading._ Multiple Choice1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Multiple Choice Directions: Choose the best answer for each of the following. 1. According to the author, the real book owners are those who _____. A) have paid for them B) have gained their property right C) have their minds enriched D) have dipped into most of them

  26. KEY KEY Globe Reading_ Multiple Choice2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 2. The purpose of the author’s comparing the beefsteak in the butcher’s to that in your ice box is that ________________. A) you have paid for them so that you can take them back B) you can cook them anyway you like since they are yours C) you don’t get anything valuable unless you have made them part of yourself D) you are the real owner of beefsteak since you have paid for them 3. The author uses the example of beefsteak to remind us that ______. A) books are as important as beefsteak to our body B) books must be absorbed as beefsteak is in our body and to do us good C) books should be kept in a good place just as beefsteak in an ice box D) we can write in the books since we have paid for them

  27. KEY KEY Globe Reading_ Multiple Choice3 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 4. Which of the following is NOT true? A) The author would have to mark up a painting or a statue. B) The author wouldn’t let his baby make drawings on an original painting by a great artist. C) The author wouldn’t scribble all over a rare or an elegantly bound edition. D) The author would take pains to keep intact the physical appearance of famous books. 5. What is the best title for this part? A) Ownership of a book and book owners B) Don’t write in rare and elegant edition C) Show respects to the author by buying a cheap edition D) Read through all the books you have bought

  28. Globe Reading._table completion Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Question and Answer Why is marking up a book indispensable to reading? First, it keeps you awake. Second, it helps to express your thinking. Third, it helps you remember the thoughts you had, or the thoughts the author expressed.

  29. Globe Reading._chart completion Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Chart Completion Directions: Fill in the necessary information based on Part 4. Active Reading   Write “between the lines” Read “between the lines”  How? Underlining Vertical lines at the margin Star, asterisk, or other doo-dad at the margin 1. 2. 3. Numbers of other pages in the margin 4. Numbers in the margin 5. 6. Circling of key words or phrases Writing in the margin 7.

  30. Article_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading “Don’t ever mark in a book!” Thousands of teachers, librarians and parents have so advised. But Mortimer Adler disagrees. He thinks so long as you own the book and needn’t preserve its physical appearance, marking it properly will grant you the ownership of the book in the true sense of the word and make it a part of yourself.

  31. Article1_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading How to Mark a Book Mortimer J. Adler You know you have to read “between the lines” to get the most out of anything. I want to persuade you to do something equally important in the course of your reading. I want to persuade you to “write between the lines.” Unless you do, you are not likely to do the most efficient kind of reading. You shouldn’t mark up a book which isn’t yours. Librarians (or your friends) who lend you books expect you to keep them clean, and you should. If you decide that I am right about the usefulness of marking books, you will have to buy them.

  32. Article2_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are two ways in which one can own a book. The first is the property right you establish by paying for it, just as you pay for clothes and furniture. But this act of purchase is only the prelude to possession. Full ownership comes only when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it is by writing in it. An illustration may make the point clear. You buy a beefsteak and transfer it from the butcher’s icebox to your own. But you do not own the beefsteak in the most important sense until you consume it and get it into your bloodstream. I am arguing that books, too, must be absorbed in your bloodstream to do you any good.

  33. Article3_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are three kinds of book owners. The first has all the standard sets and best-sellers — unread, untouched.(This individual owns wood pulp and ink, not books.) The second has a great many books — a few of them read through, most of them dipped into, but all of them as clean and shiny as the day they were bought. (This person would probably like to make books his own, but is restrained by a false respect for their physical appearance.) The third has a few books or many — every one of them dog-eared and dilapidated, shaken and loosened by continual use, marked and scribbled in from front to back. (This man owns books.)

  34. Article4_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Is it false respect, you may ask, to preserve intact a beautifully printed book, an elegantly bound edition? Of course not. I’d no more scribble all over a first edition of “Paradise Lost” than I’d give my baby a set of crayons and an original Rembrandt! I wouldn’t mark up a painting or a statue. Its soul, so to speak, is inseparable from its body. And the beauty of a rare edition or of a richly manufactured volume is like that of a painting or a statue. If your respect for magnificent binding or printing gets in the way, buy yourself a cheap edition and pay your respects to the author. Why is marking up a book indispensable to reading? First, it keeps you awake. (And I don’t mean merely conscious; I mean wide awake.) In the second place, reading, if it is active, is thinking, and thinking tends to express itself in words, spoken or written. The marked book is usually the thought-through book. Finally, writing helps you remember the thoughts you had, or the thoughts the author expressed. Let me develop these three points.

  35. Article5_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading If reading is to accomplish anything more than passing time, it must be active. You can’t let your eyes glide across the lines of a book and come up with an understanding of what you have read. Now an ordinary piece of light fiction, like, say, “Gone with the Wind”, doesn’t require the most active kind of reading. The books you read for pleasure can be read in a state of relaxation, and nothing is lost. But a great book, rich in ideas and beauty, a book that raises and tries to answer great fundamental questions, demands the most active reading of which you are capable. You don’t absorb the ideas of John Dewey the way you absorb the crooning of Mr. Vallee. You have to reach for them. That you cannot do while you’re asleep.

  36. Article6_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading If, when you’ve finished reading a book, the pages are filled with your notes, you know that you read actively. The most famous active reader of great books I know is President Hutchins, of the University of Chicago. He also has the hardest schedule of business activities of any man I know. He invariably reads with a pencil, and sometimes, when he picks up a book and pencil in the evening, he finds himself, instead of making intelligent notes, drawing what he calls “caviar factories” on the margins. When that happens, he puts the book down. He knows he’s too tired to read, and he’s just wasting time.

  37. Article7_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading But, you may ask, why is writing necessary? Well, the physical act of writing, with your own hand, brings words and sentences more sharply before your mind and preserves them better in your memory. To set down your reaction to important words and sentences you have read, and the questions they have raised in your mind, is to preserve those reactions and sharpen those questions. You can pick up the book the following week or year, and there are all your points of agreement, disagreement, doubt and inquiry. It’s like resuming an interrupted conversation with the advantage of being able to pick up where you left off.

  38. Article8_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading And that is exactly what reading a book should be: a conversation between you and the author. Presumably he knows more about the subject than you do; naturally you’ll have the proper humility as you approach him. But don’t let anybody tell you that a reader is supposed to be solely on the receiving end. Understanding is a two-way operation; learning doesn’t consist in being an empty receptacle. The learner has to question himself and question the teacher. He even has to argue with the teacher, once he understands what the teacher is saying. And marking a book is literally an expression of your differences, or agreements of opinion, with the author.

  39. Article9_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are all kinds of devices for marking a book intelligently and fruitfully. Here’s the way I do it: 1. Underlining: of major points, of important or forceful statements. 2. Vertical lines at the margin: to emphasize a statement already underlined. 3. Star, asterisk, or other doo-dad at the margin: to be used sparingly, to emphasize the ten or twenty most important statements in the book. 4. Numbers in the margin: to indicate the sequence of points the author makes in developing a single argument. 5. Numbers of other pages in the margin: to indicate where else in the book the author made points relevant to the point marked; to tie up the ideas in a book, which, though they may be separated by many pages, belong together. 6. Circling of key words or phrases.

  40. Article10_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 7. Writing in the margin, or at the top or bottom of the page, for the sake of: recording questions (and perhaps answers) which a passage raised in your mind; reducing a complicated discussion to a simple statement; recording the sequence of major points right through the book. I use the end-papers at the back of the book to make a personal index of the author’s points in the order of their appearance. The front end-papers are, to me, the most important. Some people reserve them for a fancy bookplate. I reserve them for fancy thinking. After I have finished reading the book and making my personal index on the back end-papers, I turn to the front and try to outline the book, not page by page, or point by point (I’ve already done that at the back), but as an integrated structure, with a basic unity and an order of parts. This outline is, to me, the measure of my understanding of the work.

  41. Article1_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading How to Mark a Book Mortimer J. Adler You know you have to read “between the lines” to get the most out of anything. I want to persuade you to do something equally important in the course of your reading. I want to persuade you to “write between the lines.” Unless you do, you are not likely to do the most efficient kind of reading. You shouldn’t mark up a book which isn’t yours. Librarians (or your friends) who lend you books expect you to keep them clean, and you should. If you decide that I am right about the usefulness of marking books, you will have to buy them.

  42. Article2_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are two ways in which one can own a book. The first is the property right you establish by paying for it, just as you pay for clothes and furniture. But this act of purchase is only the prelude to possession. Full ownership comes only when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it is by writing in it. An illustration may make the point clear. You buy a beefsteak and transfer it from the butcher’s icebox to your own. But you do not own the beefsteak in the most important sense until you consume it and get it into your bloodstream. I am arguing that books, too, must be absorbed in your bloodstream to do you any good.

  43. Article3_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are three kinds of book owners. The first has all the standard sets and best-sellers — unread, untouched. (This individual owns wood pulp and ink, not books.) The second has a great many books — a few of them read through, most of them dipped into, but all of them as clean and shiny as the day they were bought. (This person would probably like to make books his own, but is restrained by a false respect for their physical appearance.) The third has a few books or many — every one of them dog-eared and dilapidated, shaken and loosened by continual use, marked and scribbled in from front to back. (This man owns books.)

  44. Article4_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Is it false respect, you may ask, to preserve intact a beautifully printed book, an elegantly bound edition? Of course not. I’d no more scribble all over a first edition of “Paradise Lost” than I’d give my baby a set of crayons and an original Rembrandt! I wouldn’t mark up a painting or a statue. Its soul, so to speak, is inseparable from its body. And the beauty of a rare edition or of a richly manufactured volume is like that of a painting or a statue. If your respect for magnificent binding or printing gets in the way, buy yourself a cheap edition and pay your respects to the author. Why is marking up a book indispensable to reading? First, it keeps you awake. (And I don’t mean merely conscious; I mean wide awake.) In the second place, reading, if it is active, is thinking, and thinking tends to express itself in words, spoken or written. The marked book is usually the thought-through book. Finally, writing helps you remember the thoughts you had, or the thoughts the author expressed. Let me develop these three points.

  45. Article6_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading If, when you’ve finished reading a book, the pages are filled with your notes, you know that you read actively. The most famous active reader of great books I know is President Hutchins, of the University of Chicago. He also has the hardest schedule of business activities of any man I know. He invariably reads with a pencil, and sometimes, when he picks up a book and pencil in the evening, he finds himself, instead of making intelligent notes, drawing what he calls “caviar factories” on the margins. When that happens, he puts the book down. He knows he’s too tired to read, and he’s just wasting time.

  46. Article7_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading But, you may ask, why is writing necessary? Well, the physical act of writing, with your own hand, brings words and sentences more sharply before your mind and preserves them better in your memory. To set down your reaction to important words and sentences you have read, and the questions they have raised in your mind, is to preserve those reactions and sharpen those questions. You can pick up the book the following week or year, and there are all your points of agreement, disagreement, doubt and inquiry. It’s like resuming an interrupted conversation with the advantage of being able to pick up where you left off.

  47. Article8_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading And that is exactly what reading a book should be: a conversation between you and the author. Presumably he knows more about the subject than you do; naturally you’ll have the proper humility as you approach him. But don’t let anybody tell you that a reader is supposed to be solely on the receiving end. Understanding is a two-way operation; learning doesn’t consist in being an empty receptacle. The learner has to question himself and question the teacher. He even has to argue with the teacher, once he understands what the teacher is saying. And marking a book is literally an expression of your differences, or agreements of opinion, with the author.

  48. Article9_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading There are all kinds of devices for marking a book intelligently and fruitfully. Here’s the way I do it: 1. Underlining: of major points, of important or forceful statements. 2. Vertical lines at the margin: to emphasize a statement already underlined. 3. Star, asterisk, or other doo-dad at the margin: to be used sparingly, to emphasize the ten or twenty most important statements in the book. 4. Numbers in the margin: to indicate the sequence of points the author makes in developing a single argument. 5. Numbers of other pages in the margin: to indicate where else in the book the author made points relevant to the point marked; to tie up the ideas in a book, which, though they may be separated by many pages, belong together. 6. Circling of key words or phrases.

  49. Article9_w Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 7. Writing in the margin, or at the top or bottom of the page, for the sake of: recording questions (and perhaps answers) which a passage raised in your mind; reducing a complicated discussion to a simple statement; recording the sequence of major points right through the book. I use the end-papers at the back of the book to make a personal index of the author’s points in the order of their appearance. The front end-papers are, to me, the most important. Some people reserve them for a fancy bookplate. I reserve them for fancy thinking. After I have finished reading the book and making my personal index on the back end-papers, I turn to the front and try to outline the book, not page by page, or point by point (I’ve already done that at the back), but as an integrated structure, with a basic unity and an order of parts. This outline is, to me, the measure of my understanding of the work.

  50. Article1_S_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading What does the author imply in these sentences? There are two ways in which one can own a book. The first is the property right you establish by paying for it, just as you pay for clothes and furniture. But this act of purchase is only the prelude to possession. Full ownership comes only when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it is by writing in it. An illustration may make the point clear. You buy a beefsteak and transfer it from the butcher’s icebox to your own. But you do not own the beefsteak in the most important sense until you consume it and get it into your bloodstream. I am arguing that books, too, must be absorbed in your bloodstream to do you any good. If one buys a book, he or she becomes its owner. In other words, one has established the property right over the book by paying for it. But the author proposes a second meaning. That is what he calls “full” ownership. Buying a book is not enough to “fully” own it. One has to read it and digest it to make it one’s own.