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LABORATORY SCHOOLS

LABORATORY SCHOOLS

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LABORATORY SCHOOLS

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  1. LABORATORY SCHOOLS Presented to: The Committee on College Partnership Laboratory Schools Virginia Board of Education June 23, 2010

  2. HISTORY OF LABORATORY SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES • Sources: • Challenge to Laboratory Schools: Finding a Niche (address prepared for the NALS convention), February 1984 • Experiencing Education, 100 Years of Learning at The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, by William Harms and Ida DePencier, 1996 • Overview of Laboratory Schools and Development Research Schools in the United States, unpublished • manuscripts by Ted Rodgers, Lynn McCarthy, and Albert Bertani; http://nals.net/publications/overview_lab.htm • The History of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools by Ida DePencier, 1996

  3. History of Laboratory Schools in the United States • John Dewey is credited with the establishment of Laboratory Schools. • Dewey, hired to head the Department of Philosophy by the University of Chicago in the summer of 1894, had interests in experimental psychology and pedagogy. • In January 1895 with $1,000 provided by the University of Chicago, the Dewey School, now known as the Laboratory Schools of the University of Chicago, opened. • Dewey School (named as the Laboratory School around 1901) • Rooms: 3 • Students: approximately 16 • Mission: discover “how a school could become a cooperative community” [Source: The History of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools by Ida DePencier, 1996.]

  4. THE DEWEY SCHOOL At the Laboratory Schools, students studied the role of textiles by working by spinning yarn. They learned social skills by working together. [Source: Experiencing Education, 100 Years of Learning at The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, by William Harms and Ida DePencier ,http://www.ucls.uchicago.edu/about-lab/history/index.aspx]

  5. Dewey’s Beliefs on Lab Schools • “Students begin learning by experimentation and develop interests in traditional subjects to help them gather information. • Students are part of a social group in which everyone learns to help each other. • Students should be challenged to use their creativity to arrive at individual solutions to problems. • The child, not the lesson, is the center of the teacher’s attention; each student has individual strengths which should be cultivated and grown.” [Source: Experiencing Education, 100 Years of Learning at The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, by William Harms and Ida DePencier]

  6. Phases of Laboratory Schools • 1850-1900 – PHASE I • Model school in which future teachers “could observe model teaching by master teachers, model discipline and the newest equipment” (MacPherson and McGee, 1982) • 1900-1930 – PHASE 2 • Laboratory for researchers in psychology and pedagogy “comparable to other scientific laboratories” (Dewey, 1956) • 1930-1975 – PHASE 3 • Teaching practice site and as a “college preparatory school that was occasionally, but not primarily, experimental (McPherson and McGee, 1982) • 1975-Present • A multicultural center linked to a network of similar centers, within which, critical inquiries in education can be undertaken and from which pedagogical results can be diffused. [Source: Overview of Laboratory Schools and Development Research Schools in the United States, unpublished manuscripts by Ted Rodgers, Lynn McCarthy, and Albert Bertani; http://nals.net/publications/overview_lab.htm]

  7. Factors Contributing to the Success of the Chicago Laboratory School • Strong leadership of a dedicated educator; • A body of specific theory as focus for research inquiries; • Strong involvement of university academic departments in laboratory school based research; • Inquiry as a school pervasive theme; and • An inherent respect for the contributions of teachers, administrators, parents, and students. [Source: Overview of Laboratory Schools and Development Research Schools in the United States, unpublished manuscripts by Ted Rodgers, Lynn McCarthy, and Albert Bertani; http://nals.net/publications/overview_lab.htm]

  8. Cycles of History of Laboratory Schools • Laboratory Schools have experienced change since their inception. When founded, “they were designed to serve as laboratories where innovative programs and practices would bridge education theory to classroom practice.”* • From the late 1950s through the 1960s, teacher preparation programs focused on conducting experimentation and training in the “real world” rather than in laboratory schools. Some perceived laboratory schools as “unrealistic environments enrolling the gifted children of academics.”* • In the 1950s, there were approximately 200 laboratory schools.** [Sources: *Overview of Laboratory Schools and Development Research Schools in the United States, unpublished manuscripts by Ted Rodgers, Lynn McCarthy, and Albert Bertani; http://nals.net/publications/overview_lab.htm]; **Challenge to Laboratory Schools: Finding a Niche (address prepared for the NALS convention), February 1984]

  9. Cycles of History of Laboratory Schools • During the 1970s, budget constraints affected laboratory school operations. • Even though many laboratory schools closed during these years, some were able to make changes and survived. “They became sites for: • clinical teaching activities, • research, • curriculum development, • in-service education, • multiethnic education, • special education serving a variety of exceptionalities, • early childhood programs, • demonstration centers for production of videotapes, and • laboratories for assessing staffing and organizational schemes.” • In the 1990s, laboratory schools rallied with “a new sense of direction and purpose as ‘clinical schools’.” [Source: Overview of Laboratory Schools and Development Research Schools in the United States, unpublished manuscripts by Ted Rodgers, Lynn McCarthy, and Albert Bertani; http://nals.net/publications/overview_lab.htm]

  10. LABORATORY SCHOOLS IN VIRGINIA Source: Information obtained from an e-mail survey sent to colleges and universities. Please note that not all institutions responded to the survey.

  11. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Eastern Mennonite University • Since 1977, Eastern Mennonite University has operated a laboratory school for two-, three-, and four-year olds. The school continues to operate.

  12. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Hampton University • In 1962, Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) established a non-graded laboratory school. The school operated until 1992. • The school was under the direction of a head teacher and six classroom teachers for the two divisions: • Primary (Grades one, two, and three); and • Intermediate (Grades four, five, and six).

  13. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • James Madison University • The laboratory school, (teaching children pre-k through 7 and special education-learning disabilities) operated from 1958 to 1982. • The lab school was closed; however, a Young Children’s Program for Pre-Kindergarten was retained and is still operational.

  14. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Longwood University • The Laboratory School (Kindergarten through grade 7) at Longwood College (now University) opened in 1970 and closed in 1982. • Longwood’s Nursery School closed in the spring 2001. • The school accepted children of faculty and staff. Additional spaces for children were open to the community by lottery.

  15. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Mary Baldwin College • Mary Baldwin College operated a Preschool Lab School in the 1970s.

  16. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Norfolk State University • The Norfolk State University Child Development Laboratory opened in 1979 and is currently in operation through the School of Education. • The laboratory school serves preschoolers ages two-and-a-half years old through five years old.

  17. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Radford University • The Radford McGuffey Training School was built in the early 1930s. The school (kindergarten through 7th grade) was part of the city’s public school system. The school was housed in Whitt Hall, which was built expressly as a demonstration site for elementary education using the best architectural principals for elementary education. • In 1950, Whitt Hall was renovated as a business building, and the McGuffey Training School was closed. The school became a nursery school, Early Learning Lab, that was closed in 2003.

  18. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Sweet Briar College • A Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten campus school was established 52 years ago at Sweet Briar College that will close this summer (2010).

  19. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • The College of William and Mary • The College of William and Mary operated a grammar school, beginning in 1867 that served needy children. In 1873, the College took over full operation of “Mattey’s School” for the City of Williamsburg, and the school served as a “model and practice school.” • The College operated the school through 1912 at which time the College assisted the City of Williamsburg to construct the present-day Matthew Whaley School that opened in 1930. [Source: History of Public Schools in Williamsburg, 1968]

  20. Laboratory Schools in Virginia • Virginia Tech • Two Laboratory Schools: • General elementary education lab school operational in the 1950s and 1960s. The school was closed due to budget reductions. • Human Development Department Lab School (converted to a child care center).

  21. National Association of Laboratory Schools (NALS) Source (Web Site Excerpts): www.nals.net

  22. National Association of Laboratory Schools (NALS) • “NALS is an international association of pre-kindergarten through graduate laboratory and university affiliated schools.”

  23. LABORATORY SCHOOLS in the United States “Review of Selected Lab Schools”

  24. University of Chicago Chicago Laboratory Schools Source (Web site excerpts): www.ucls.uchicago.edu

  25. The University of Chicago (Illinois) Laboratory Schools Diversity: Students attend from all over the city and surrounding areas, representing the ethnic heritage of 65 countries. Students pursue a rigorous curriculum in reading, writing, mathematics, and science; begin the study of foreign languages, music, and the arts in early grades.

  26. The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools The Laboratory Schools are a division of the University of Chicago and are an integral part of the University community. Nearly half of the families are employed by the University and many more have connections to it, past and present. University of Chicago faculty and prospective faculty receive priority attention in the application process.

  27. The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

  28. Ball State University Burris Laboratory School Source (Web Site Excerpts): www.bsu.edu/burris/

  29. Ball State University (Indiana): Burris Laboratory School Established in 1929; located on the campus of Ball State University. Since 1974, Burris Laboratory School has been a separate school district and has the entire state of Indiana as its enrollment district. In 1990, Burris, with the addition of the Indiana Academy of Science, Mathematics, and Humanities, became part of University Schools. In 2004, Burris and the Indiana Academy became separate school corporations. Burris is the only school in the Laboratory School Corporation.

  30. Ball State UniversityBurris Laboratory School The Burris Laboratory School is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and by the State of Indiana. Burris does not have a school board; the Ball State University Board of Trustees is the ultimate authority for school policies.

  31. Ball State UniversityBurris Laboratory School • Kindergarten–Grade 12 School • Enrollment (2008-09) • 549 Students • Graduates: 43 (2009 Graduation Rate; 93.3%) • Free Lunch (2008-09) • 15% free • 11% reduced • 74% paid

  32. University of Illinois University Laboratory High School Source (Web Site Excerpts): www.uni.illinois.edu

  33. University of Illinois University Laboratory High School • Vision • Promotes “academic excellence, encourages educational innovation, and develops citizenship for highly motivated, academically talented students.” • Newsweek Magazine ranked “Uni” as one of the top 21 “Public Elite” high schools in the nation in 2006, 2007, and 2009.

  34. University of Illinois University Laboratory High School • Established in 1921. • Located on the campus of the University of Illinois in Urbana, Illinois. • Enrollment: 300 students (Caucasion-63%; Asian American-26%; Hispanic-5%; and American Indian-1%). • Grades: 9-12 (preceded by a composite 7th- and 8th-grade year known as the “subfreshman year”). • “Uni” is a public school with a competitive admissions process.

  35. University of IllinoisUniversity Laboratory High School • Funding (No tuition is charged.) • Greatest portion provided by the Illinois State Board of Education. • Some salary support, utilities, building maintenance provided by the University of Illinois. • Donations from private sources (anticipated donations of $500,000 from current use and endowment funds this year). Note: The school is a public school but it does not receive any local property tax dollars because it is not a part of a school district.

  36. University of Florida P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School Source (Web Site Excerpts): www.pky.ufl.edu

  37. University of Florida: P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School • Established in 1934 (Kindergarten through Grade 12 school); located on the campus of the University of Florida. • Designed as a Special Public School District under the Florida Department of Education funding. • Enrollment: Approximately 1,150 students (Caucasian-51%; African American-24%; Hispanic-16%; Multi-racial-5%; and Asian-3%).

  38. University of Florida: P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School • Develops “innovative solutions to educational concerns in the state and to disseminate successful instructional programs to other school districts.” • Primary Research Goal: To “enhance instruction in mathematics, science, computer science, and foreign languages in a program that utilizes state of the art educational technology.” • Literary Reform: Focused in the last ten years on “improving reading achievement by integrating research-based instructional strategies and curriculums.” • Emerging Leader in Science and Technology Reform: Focused on “developing skills and strategies for integrating and demonstrating research-based practices” in preparation “for future leadership and school renewal opportunities in math, science, and technology.”

  39. Florida Atlantic University Florida Atlantic University Schools SOURCES http://www.coe.fau.edu/erccd/ http://www.adhus.fau.edu/ http://www.fauhigh.fau.edu/ http://www.pinejog.org/ http://www.tradition.fau.edu/

  40. Florida Atlantic UniversityFlorida Atlantic University Schools • Four state universities are authorized to operate laboratory or charter lab schools by Florida statutes: • Florida Atlantic University • Florida A&M University • Florida State University • University of Florida

  41. Florida Atlantic UniversityFlorida Atlantic University Schools • Schools • Karen Slattery Educational Research Center for Child Development • Birth to Age 5. • Located on the Boca Raton campus. • Priority enrollment given to university students, faculty, staff, and Research Development Park employees. • Monthly tuition (2009-2010): • Infant/Toddler: $975 • Twos: $845 • Preschool: $741 • Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (full day): $495

  42. Florida Atlantic UniversityFlorida Atlantic University Schools • A. D. Henderson Elementary and Middle School • Kindergarten – Grade 8 Public School • The Dean of the College of Education is the designated Superintendent. • Mission: • Being a demonstration site for teacher education; • Developing curricula; and • Conducting research. • No tuition is charged. Florida statutes authorize university lab schools to charge an “activity fee” to be used for non-instructional student activities including: extra-curricular activities, sports, field trips, and other student related costs.

  43. Florida Atlantic UniversityFlorida Atlantic University Schools • Florida Atlantic University (FAU) High School • Approved in the spring of 2004; opened to students in the fall of 2004 (public school). • Intensive dual enrollment high school. • “Unlike other high schools, this program does not use extensive facilities in which to operate. Students experience college level courses in the environment of university classrooms, laboratories, and support facilities.” • Highly selective program. • “All costs related to university tuition, fees (except parking), and even books are covered by the FAU High Schools.” • Grades 10-12 or “collegiate” students can complete up to 17 university credits per semester.

  44. Florida Atlantic UniversityFlorida Atlantic University Schools • Palm Pointe Educational Research School at Tradition • Kindergarten through Grade 8 School. • Charter Laboratory School. • An educational research school with a unique partnership between Florida Atlantic University and the St. Lucia County School Board.

  45. Louisiana State University Louisiana State University Laboratory School Source (Web Site Excerpts): www.uhigh.lsu.edu

  46. Louisiana State UniversityUniversity Laboratory School Kindergarten – Grade 12 public school; operating for almost 100 years. Located on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Enrollment: 1,342 2009 Graduating Class: 99

  47. Louisiana State UniversityUniversity Laboratory School • Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Louisiana Department of Education • Tuition • 2009-2010: $3,835 for all grades

  48. Louisiana State UniversityUniversity Laboratory School The first International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program school in Louisiana. The school is adopting the complete K-12 IB program. All instructors have master’s degrees or a doctorate degree.

  49. Questions Contact: Division of Policy and Communications Virginia Department of Education P. O. Box 2120 Richmond, Virginia 23218-2120