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Literacy Design Collaborative

Literacy Design Collaborative

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Literacy Design Collaborative

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  1. Welcome To Day 1 Literacy Design Collaborative Using Literacy as a Tool for Learning Content

  2. LDC Participant Pre-Survey

  3. Norms • Parking Lot • Housekeeping • Materials

  4. ArkLDC Expectations SY2014-2015 • 3 days in summer, 3 days during school year • Optional Summer LDC Work Days • 6 on-site visits • Plan at least three (3) modules and implement in the classroom with students • Reflect • Share with others • LiveBinders

  5. ArkLDCProfessional Learning Opportunities • Days 1-3 (June 4-6, 2014) • Day 4 (October 2, 2014) • Day 5 (November 18, 2014) • Day 6 (January 29, 2015) • Summer Work Day 1—August 4 • Summer Work Day 2—August 8

  6. Today’s Objectives • Join the ArkLDC Professional Learning Community • Review the expectations of the Common Core State Standards • Examine how Literacy Design Collaborative works • Analyze “Section 1: What Task?” • Develop a Teaching Task

  7. Raffle Ticket

  8. History/Social Studies • CTE • Science • ELA • Other

  9. Southeast Arkansas Education Service Cooperative SEARKWiki http://searkinstructionalfacilitation.pbworks.com/w/page/41339528/Welcome • www.arkldc.wikispaces.com • Username: ArkLDCTeacher • Password: Literacy • Username: YourinitialsYourSchoolDistrict • Password: Literacy • www.ldc.org

  10. ArkLDC PLC Members • “It is a fact that in the right formation, the lifting power of many wings can achieve twice the distance of any bird flying alone.” • ~ Milton Olson~

  11. Like Us On Facebook • Southeast Arkansas Education Service Cooperative • Follow Us On Twitter • kathytsadler • Terrismith

  12. BE SWEET AND SEND US A TWEET! Tweet about today’s learning experience. #ARLDC

  13. Linking the Pieces 1. How can LDC serve as a planning tool to help you address the changes required by CCSS in your classroom? 2. How can LDC impact curriculum, instruction, and assessment in your classroom? 3. What might be the benefit(s) of moving from past/current practices to Literacy Design Collaborative?

  14. What is your depth of knowledge of the CCSS for ELA and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects? • 1 – Unsatisfactory; Below Basic • 2 – Basic • 3 – Proficient • 4 – Distinguished; Advanced

  15. Screen Shot for PollEverywhere

  16. Common Core State StandardsDevelopment The CCSS were collaboratively developed… • by: • Teachers • School Administrators • Educational Experts • to provide consistency in the education of our children, and • to prepare our students to be college and career-ready

  17. Design and Organization • Sections • Strands • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards • translated into age-appropriate benchmarks in the grade-specific standards below • Grade-Specific Standards

  18. Common Core State Standards • Align with college and career expectations; • Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through higher-order skills; • Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards; • Are informed by top-performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in a global economy and society; • Are evidence and/or research based; and • Will be reviewed and revised on a set cycle.

  19. Common Core State Standards Do Not Provide… • curricula • a pacing guide • a complete scope and sequence • a course outline • how teachers should teach • all the essential skills and knowledge students could own or need to know

  20. Common Core State Standards Do Not Provide… • curricula. • a pacing guide. • a complete scope and sequence. • a course outline. • how teachers should teach. • all the essential skills and knowledge students could own or need to know. • Provide… • the most essential skills and knowledge every student needs to master to be college and career-ready • clearer, consistent, more rigorous expectations • distributed responsibility for students’ literacy development

  21. Key Ideas from the Standards for Literacy in the Disciplinary Subjects Reading Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects • Knowledge of domain-specific vocabulary • Analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources • Synthesize quantitative and technical information, including facts presented in maps, timelines, flowcharts, or diagrams Writing Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects • Write arguments on discipline-specific content and informative/explanatory texts • Use of data, evidence, and reason to support arguments and claims • Use of domain-specific vocabulary

  22. Reading in Your Content • Think about a time when you asked students to read something in order to prepare for a discussion about the reading. • Write down four questions you typically ask students about what they read. (Participant Workbook Page 6)

  23. The Ten Anchor Standards: Reading • Key Ideas and Details • 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. • 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. • 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. • Craft and Structure • 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. • 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. • 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas • 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1 • 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. • 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity • 10.Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently ..

  24. The Ten Anchor Standards: Writing • Text Types and Purposes • 1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. • 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. • 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. • Production and Distribution of Writing • 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. • 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. • 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. • Research to Build and Present Knowledge • 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. • 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. • 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. • Range of Writing • 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and • time frames(a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  25. Reading Anchor Standard 1 • Grade Level Progression • Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Grade and Standard K - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 1stAsk and answer questions about key details in a text. 2nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text. • (No prompting)

  26. Grade and Standard 2nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text. 3rd Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 4th Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 5th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  27. Grade and Standard 5th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 6th Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 7th Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 8th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  28. Grade and Standard 8th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 9th/10th Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 11th/12th Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  29. Reading in Your Content • Return to the four questions you previously recorded about reading in your classroom. (Participant Workbook Page 6) • How do your questions align with the CCSS for your grade level? • Respond using PollEverywhere

  30. Poll Everywhere

  31. Let’s Take a Break!!!

  32. Send us a Tweet! Tweet about today’s learning experience. #ARLDC

  33. Is your goal… • to engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex texts? • to align assignments to standards and promote collaboration? • to personalize learning so that every student can master the standards? • to ensure that all students can be college and career ready?

  34. literacy [lit-er-uh-see] noun 1. the ability to read and write 2. the ability to use language proficiently

  35. Literacy is the ability to use available symbol systems that are fundamental to learning and teaching • – for the purposes of comprehending and composing • —for the purposes of making and communicating meaning and knowledge • Patricia Stock, Professor Emerita, Michigan State University (June, 2012)

  36. Literacy extends beyond the print-only world of reading and writing. • Literacies are shaped by contexts, participants, and technologies. Today's context includes developing technologies, along with visual, audio, gestural, spatial, or multimodal discourses. • —from the NCTE Policy Research Brief • Literacies of Disciplines (2011)

  37. Being literate is at the heart of learning in every subject area. • Being literate is necessary for learning. As students progress through school and engage with subject areas more deeply, concepts become more challenging. Students use a greater variety of learning resources with more and more complex language and structure and increasingly sophisticated graphical and numerical representations. Students learn writing and reading strategies, using evidence and reasoning pertinent to each subject area, to comprehend and represent knowledge using traditional and emerging media. —Principles for Learning (2010) ACTE, CoSN, NCSS, NCTE, NCTM, & NSTA

  38. Literacy involves a continuum of learning. • --in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society. • The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Position Paper (2004) The Plurality of Literacy and its Implications for Policies and Programs

  39. Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. • As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the twenty-first century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies. These literacies—from reading online newspapers to participating in virtual classrooms—are multiple, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with particular histories, life possibilities and social trajectories of individuals and groups. • NCTE Position Statement Defining 21st Century Literacies

  40. col·lab·o·ra·tionkəˌlabəˈrāSHən/ noun --the action of working with someone to produce or create something

  41. What is Literacy Design Collaborative? • An integration of CCSS for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects into middle and high school content areas • A planning tool for curriculum, instruction, and assessment • A solution based on a set of core principles

  42. LDC aligns with the Common Core State Standards. LDC distributes responsibility for reading and writing. LDC makes task central. LDC connects reading and writing instruction. LDC uses back-mapping. LDC fosters a responsive system. LDC encourages local choice. LDC strives to be teacher-friendly. The LDC Framework creates a support solution based on a set of core principles.

  43. Linking the Pieces 1. How can LDC serve as a planning tool to help you address the changes required by CCSS in your classroom? 2. How can LDC impact curriculum, instruction, and assessment in your classroom? 3. What might be the benefit(s) of moving from past/current practices to Literacy Design Collaborative?

  44. Literacy Matters