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Literacy Design Collaborative

Literacy Design Collaborative

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Literacy Design Collaborative

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  1. Literacy Design Collaborative A Framework to move from Common Core to classrooms (Two-Day Workshop) December 1 and 2

  2. The Literacy Design Collaborative An expanding set of classroom, district, state and service providers with the will to meet the challenge of expecting high levels of secondary literacy, head-on.

  3. Our LDC Project • Kentucky Department of Education • Selected districts • Participating teachers, teacher leaders and school leaders from those districts

  4. Outcomes After this full-day workshop, you should be ready to: • Describe the ways in which LDC is a strategy for achieving the Common Core State Standards and equipping all students to be successful in education and work beyond high school • Explain each LDC element and its function within the LDC framework and in relation to the other LDC elements • Explain how the LDC work draws on the expertise and collaboration of participating educators • Begin to understand how LDC can play out in your own work

  5. Why Literary Design Collaborative? In the past…

  6. which all too often ends up looking like this:

  7. The Literary Design Collaborative Approach (LDC) Tasks

  8. The Literacy Design Collaborative • Leads with the task • Hard-wired to the Common Core State Standards: 1. Rigor and relevance 2. Text complexity 3. Close reading of text 4. 21st century skills 5. Role of technology

  9. Hmmm… what’s this? [Insert question] After reading _____ (literature or informational texts), write _________(essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position

  10. Let’s try one…Activity 1.1 Should teachers be expected to master technology tools and infuse them into their instruction as a primary strategy to engage 21st century learners? After viewing a video and reading selected informational texts, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s).

  11. What do you need to do? • View the video – 21st Century Learners http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_A-ZVCjfWf8 • Read selected texts 1. Rigor Redefined – Tony Wagner • Access information from the internet • Discuss and decide • Write claim statement and supporting evidence

  12. What did you decide... Whole group sharing out Should teachers be expected to master technology tools and infuse them into their instruction as a primary strategy to engage 21st century learners?

  13. The LDC Framework Pages 10-11 Common standards, local choices!

  14. Tasks The tasks students engage are at the center!

  15. Template Tasks Template tasks are the beginning point for the LDC strategy. An LDC template task is a fill-in-the-blank assignment or assessment based on the common core literacy standards. Page 15

  16. Template Tasks ‘The real accountability system is in the tasks that students are asked to do.’ Why the emphasis on tasks? “What was different in the four classrooms was what students were actually being asked to do, and the degree to which the teacher was able to engage students in the work by scaffolding their learning up to the complexity of the task she was asking them to do.” – Richard Elmore

  17. Template Tasks All LDC tasks require students to: • Read, analyze, and comprehend texts as specified by the common core • Write products as specified by the common core (focusing on argumentation, informational/explanatory, and narrative) • Apply common core literacy standards to content (ELA, social studies, and/or science) The tasks are designed to ensure that students receive literacy and content instruction in rigorous academic reading and writing tasks that prepare them for success in college by the end of their high school career. Page 18

  18. Argumentation/Analysis Template Task After researching ______(informational texts) on _________(content), write __________ (essay or substitute) that argues your position on_____ (content). Support your position with evidence from your research. L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

  19. Argumentation/Analysis Template Task • After researching academic articles and selected informational text on censorship, write an editorial that argues your position on the use of filters by schools. Support your position with evidence from your research. L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. • After researching technical and academic articles on the use of pesticides in agriculture, write a speech that argues your position on its use in managing crop production. Support your position with evidence from your research. L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

  20. Informational/Definition Template Task After researching _____ (informational texts) on _____ (content), write ________(report or substitute) that defines ____ (term or concept) and explains _____ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from your research. L2 What ____________ (conclusions or implications) can you draw?

  21. Informational/Definition Template Task • After researching articles and political documents on government lobbyists, write a report that defines “advocacy” and explains the lobbyist as a form of an advocate and his/her role in our political system. Support your discussion with evidence from your research. L2 What implications can you draw? • After researching scientific articles and selected informational texts on magnetism, write a report that defines “magnetism” and explains its role in the planetary system. Support your discussion with evidence from your research.

  22. Template Task Rubrics LDC template tasks use shared rubrics (scoring guides) to decide whether student work meets expectations. One scoring guide works for all argumentation tasks, another for all informational and explanatory tasks, and a third for the narrative tasks. Shared rubrics support teacher collaboration across grades and subjects, including: • Shared scoring to develop common expectations and language • Joint analysis of student work • Collaborative planning around instructional strategies and improvements

  23. Connections Across Grade & Content Areas After researching ______ (informational texts) on ______ (content), write ______ (essay or substitute) that argues your position on ______ (content). Support your position with evidence from your research. ALIGNMENT across grades DISTRIBUTION across content areas

  24. LDC Template Task Collection … Page 19 The first collection with more to come!

  25. Modules Modules wrap a teaching plan around the task.

  26. Modules Support a system for literacy instruction. Module templates support teachers in developing instruction to use over about 2-4 weeks. They help teachers design instruction – their choice – focused on guiding students to complete a single literacy task linked to content.

  27. LDC Module Template

  28. Unpacking a LDC Module Economic Systems Module

  29. Kathy’s powerpoint • Kathy Thiebes is a high school Social Studies teacher in Oregon. She is an “early implementer” of the LDC framework. This powerpoint explains her thinking, planning and teaching of an LDC Template Task.

  30. Your Turn! Use Activity 1.2 Deconstructing Modules in your notebook to: • Look through the LDC example module • Make notes on your observations, immediate questions, what you want to learn more about • Find a partner to discuss your notes • Be ready to share out

  31. But We Need to Move … From blueprint to action!

  32. LDC Offers a Different Choice! So teachers don’t have to ‘move from blueprint to action’ alone.

  33. Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Providing the Undergirding for the LDC Framework

  34. Common Core State Standards Are a blueprint.

  35. Common Core State Standards Now Shared by Most States * corestandards.org, July 29, 2011

  36. Common Core State Standards Initiative • State-led effort • Coordinated by the National Governors Association for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)

  37. Common Core Standards Development • Collaboratively developed with: • Teachers • School Administrators • Educational Experts • To provide consistency in the education of our children • To be college and career-ready

  38. Common Core State Standards • Do Not Provide… • A complete scope and sequence. • A course outline. • All the essential skills and knowledge students could have. • Do… • Outline the most essential skills and knowledge every student needs to master to be college and career-ready. • Distribute responsibility for students’ literacy development.

  39. Analyzing theArchitecture and Structuresof theCommon Core State Standards

  40. 4 Strands • Reading • Literature • Informational • Foundations • Writing • Listening and Speaking • Language

  41. 6 Structural Components

  42. Reading: Literature and Informational Text

  43. Anchor Standards for Reading • Circle the strand • Draw a box around the anchor standards • Draw a bracket around the note • Draw a line under the organizing elements • Read the anchor standards and note on range and content of student reading

  44. At a Glance…

  45. Turn and Talk • What are you thinking? • What have you noticed? • What benefits do you see?

  46. Writing

  47. Analyzing Reading Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Grade and Standard K - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 1st - Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 2nd - Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text. Change in Expectations Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (no prompting) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and howto demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text.

  48. Grade and Standard 2nd - Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text. 3rd - Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 4th - Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 5th - Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Change in Expectation Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and howto demonstrateunderstanding of key details in a text. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  49. Grade and Standard 5th - Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 6th - Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 7th - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 8th - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Change in Expectation Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite several pieces of textual evidenceto support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supportsan analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  50. Grade and Standard 8th - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 9th and 10th - Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 11th and 12th - Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Change in Expectation Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.