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Literacy Design Collaborative

Literacy Design Collaborative

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Literacy Design Collaborative

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  1. Literacy Design Collaborative Literacy in Science Toxins Essay

  2. Task Overview • After researching 3 scientific articles on toxins, write an essay for your family that defines “toxicity” and explains how they enter the body, the harmful effects they can have on the human body, and recommendations for reducing exposure in their house. Support your discussion with evidence from your research.

  3. SHORT RESPONSE - Reaction • In a quick write, write your first reaction to the task prompt. Add some notes of things you know about this issue. • After researching 3 scientific articles on toxins, write an essay for your family that defines “toxicity” and explains how they enter the body, the harmful effects they can have on the human body, and recommendations for reducing exposure in their house. Support your discussion with evidence from your research.

  4. SHORT RESPONSE – Analysis • In your own words, what are the important features of a good response to this prompt? • After researching 3 scientific articles on toxins, write an essay for your family that defines “toxicity” and explains how they enter the body, the harmful effects they can have on the human body, and recommendations for reducing exposure in their house. Support your discussion with evidence from your research.

  5. TEXT SELECTION • You have received the required reading, “Health Effects of Toxic Chemicals” • Peruse the other 5 articles on: • BPA • Radon • Cigarettes • Lead • Mercury. • Choose 3 articles on toxins.

  6. ACTIVE READING • Use strategies that are already familiar to you such as talking to the text. • Use the Cornell Note Taking System • Read the required article, “Health Effects of Toxic Chemicals”, using the Cornell Note Taking System • Teacher demonstrates and class reads/writes notes together

  7. CORNELL NOTE TAKING

  8. CORNELL NOTE TAKING

  9. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY • Define “plagiarism” and list ways to avoid it. • (def): the practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one’s own

  10. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY • MLA Citations • In-text citations and a Bibliography • http://www.dianahacker.com/pdfs/hacker-daly-mla.pdf • http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/pdf/Hacker-Orlov-MLA.pdf • Source: Diana Hacker (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006). • In a group, view the sample paper, taking notes on the important considerations for MLA format

  11. TRANSITION TO WRITING • In a quick write (or think-pair-share), discuss what you have learned now that you’ve read an article about __insert toxin , • Be sure to discuss which new information from the articles will be useful for your essay in answering the prompt.

  12. CONTROLLING IDEA • Controlling idea: • A controlling idea is the same as a "thesis statement" of an essay. It's called a "controlling idea" by the Regents because this opening statement should "control" the rest of your writing. • What Makes A Good Controlling Idea? • Relevant to the essay topic/question • Contains only 1 main idea • Can be proven with details from each text • Reflects the main idea of the paragraph/essay • Makes a definite statement (no "I think"/if) • Be simple and specific.  • Mention the common topic in the controlling idea sentence. 

  13. CONTROLLING IDEA • Read the examples of controlling idea sentences and identify good controlling ideas.

  14. CONTROLLING IDEA Example for How to Write a Controlling Idea:  Identify the topic. Check the prompt to see what your topic is.  (2) Turn the topic into a question, "What does (Text 1) and (Text 2) both say/show/tell us about ____ (the topic)? (3) Your answer will be your controlling idea, but be sure you can back it up with evidence from the text/s. If not, start over :) 

  15. WRITING PROCESS • Write an opening paragraph that includes a controlling idea and sequences the key points you plan to make in your composition.

  16. INTRODUCTION

  17. PLANNING • Create an outline based on your notes and reading in which you state your claim, sequence your points, and note your supporting evidence.

  18. DEVELOPMENT • Write an initial draft complete with opening, development, and closing. Insert and cite textual evidence.

  19. REVISION • Refine composition’s analysis, logic, and organization of ideas/points. Use textual evidence carefully, with accurate citations. Decide what to include and what not to include.

  20. EDITING • Revise draft to have sound spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. Adjust format as needed to provide clear, appealing text. • Reference the rubric as you edit.