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Community Disaster Mitigation Programs

Community Disaster Mitigation Programs

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Community Disaster Mitigation Programs

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Innovative Solutions for Complex Problems: Tulsa, OK a Model for Success Kyle Overly Dr. David M. Neal Oklahoma State University Fire & Emergency Management Administration Community Disaster Mitigation Programs

  2. Purpose • Demonstrate how emergent citizen groups can solve disaster vulnerability problems • Demonstrate how organizations can survive major external changes

  3. Methods • Case Selection • Tulsa, Oklahoma • Project Impact national example • Convenience • Interviews • Sample • Purposeful Selection • Document Analysis

  4. Background of Case • Population of 590,000 • Typical Hazards • Tornadoes • Frequent Flooding • Severe Weather • Tulsa settled at the crux of the Arkansas River and numerous creeks • Oil booms of the 1920’s – expediential growth • Little attention given to where growth was occurring

  5. Fed up with getting flooded out… • 1974 flood – a group of citizens gather in a soggy living room and decide to take action • Local police officer tired of taking off gun belt and wading into the waters • “Tulsans for a Better Community” • Advocacy program had 4 main points • Stop building in the floodplain • Clear out flood-prone buildings • Channels and detention ponds • Involve citizens at every point

  6. “Fix the problem”… the 70’s & 80’s • After 1976 Memorial Day flood enraged citizens phone city hall - demand the problem be fixed • City listened – moratorium of floodplain building • City hires first full time hydrologist • 1984 – worst flood in the history of Tulsa • Mayor urges that problem will be solved • FEMA buys 500 homes • Within 2 years - $2 stormwater utility fee

  7. Early resilience in the 90’s • Actions of TFBC continue to influence policy • New public works department – committed to flood control • 1992 – FEMA ranks Tulsa top of new Community Rating System • By the end of the decade, Tulsa cleared over 1000 flood prone properties • 1990’s – 1st decade without a major flood

  8. Tulsa attracts national attention • James Lee Witt selects Tulsa for Project Impact based upon their mitigation history • Tulsa Public Works opens the P.I. Office to manage the grant • 2000 - Tulsa Project Impact Foundation founded to support P.I. • Allows for donations and non-profit grants

  9. Project Impact gone…still alive in Tulsa • 2001 - FEMA Project Impact Discontinued • City of Tulsa funds P.I. activities at 100% level • Legacy of mitigation programs in Tulsa • Tulsa P.I. continues to build public-private partnerships while encouraging community participation • Scope of activities expands with Citizen Corps Grant

  10. Public to private…the legacy continues • 2006 – City Financial problems end Tulsa P.I. • Ongoing activities continue – Shifted completely to Tulsa Partners INC 501 (c) (3) • Activities continue, very little change in the mission of the organization

  11. Results • Community members can have a substantial impact on disaster policy • Broad goals allow program flexibility • Networks are vital to any organization • Merge grass roots efforts with technical experts • Resource mobilization key to long-term existence of an organization • Tulsa P.I. Foundation – in part founded in anticipation of a change in funding level

  12. Future Research • Comparative case study using multiple Project Impact cities • Multi-case comparison of other models used to manage Project Impact • Comparative case study between disaster management and other policy domains

  13. An important note… • Although Tulsa was successful in their mitigation programs, so too were other cities • The model Tulsa used was one of many different used • “We were successful, but we weren’t the only ones”

  14. Questions/Discussion • Contact Information: Kyle Overly Oklahoma State University Fire & Emergency Management Program Kyle.Overly@okstate.edu 717-629-2288