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Agile Project Management with Scrum Katharina Pflügler

Agile Project Management with Scrum Katharina Pflügler

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Agile Project Management with Scrum Katharina Pflügler

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  1. Agile Project Management with Scrum Katharina Pflügler

  2. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  3. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  4. Scrum (Rugby) Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Rugby_union_scrummage.jpg Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  5. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  6. Quick Overview I Product Owner Product Backlog Sprint Planning Meeting Sprint Backlog Scrum Team Scrum Master Sprint Executable Product Increment Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  7. Quick Overview II Daily Scrum Sprint Planning Meeting Sprint Review Meeting SPRINT Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  8. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles 3.1 Product Owner 3.2 Scrum Master 3.3 Scrum Team • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meeting • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  9. Scrum Roles: Chickens and Pigs A chicken and a pig are walking down the road. The chicken says to the pig: “Do you want to open a restaurant with me?” The pig considers the question and replies, “Yes, I’d like that. What do you want to call the restaurant?” The chicken replies, “Ham and Eggs”. The pig stops, pauses and replies, “On a second thought, I don’t think I want to open a restaurant with you. I’d be committed, but you’d only be involved.” Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  10. Scrum Roles: Product Owner • Represents the interests of all stakeholders in the project and resulting system • Tasks/Responsibilities: • is the onlyperson in charge of the Product Backlog • maintains and sustains content • prioritizes Product Backlog items • estimates Product Backlog effort • is responsible for initial and ongoing funding Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  11. Scrum Roles: Scrum Master • Represents management and team to each other • Tasks/Responsibilities: • ensures that Scrum values, practices and rules are enacted and enforced • plans and initiates Sprints together with the team • conducts Daily Scrums and ensures that impediments are promptly removed • controls progress and takes appropriate measures Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  12. Scrum Roles: Scrum Team • Tasks/Responsibilities: • formulates a Sprint Goal at the Sprint Planning Meeting • commits to turn a set of Product Backlog into a working product • self-organizes (assigns, works on, modifies and (re-)estimates tasks) → responsible for doing all analysis, design, coding, testing and user documentation → has full authority to do whatever is necessary to meet the Sprint Goal • Team size: seven people, plus or minus two • Team composition: cross-functional → analysts, designers, coding engineers Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  13. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts 4.1 Product Backlog 4.2 Sprint Backlog 4.3 Executable Product Increment • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  14. Scrum Artifacts: Product Backlog • Description: Product Backlog is a prioritized list of all features, functions, technologies, enhancements and bug fixes • Creation: first Product Backlogderived from a vision document, marketing requirements or brainstorming • Contains: • product features and technology • issues: need to be resolved before starting working on it • items are estimated in days • Who: • influenced by pigs and chickens • Product Owner makes decisions on contents, prioritizes items and estimates the effort Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  15. Scrum Artifacts: Sprint Backlog • Description: is a highly visible, real-time picture of the work that the Team plans to accomplish during the Sprint • Creation: Sprint Backlog is selected during a Sprint Planning Meeting after having established a Sprint Goal • Contains: • tasks which more detailed than in Product Backlog • each task takes four to sixteen hours to finish • Who: • Scrum Team selects the tasks and modifies/estimates them throughout the Sprint Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  16. Scrum Artifacts: Sprint Backlog Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  17. Scrum Artifacts: Executable Product Increment • Or: Increment of Potentially Shippable Product Functionality • Creation: implemented during the Sprint • Contains: • thoroughly tested, well-structured and well-written code • documentation • Who: • Scrum Team committed to deliver an executable increment at the end of the Sprint Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  18. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings 5.1 Sprint Planning Meeting 5.2 Sprint Review Meeting 5.3 Daily Scrums • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  19. Scrum Meetings: Sprint Planning Meeting I Consists of two consecutive meetings. First Meeting: • Who: • pigs: Scrum Team, Scrum Master, Product Owner • chickens: management, users, customer(s) • Input: • Product Backlog • Latest increment • Team capabilities, business conditions, technology stability • Steps: • Product Owner presents top priority Product Backlog • Discussion about what changes to the backlog are appropriate • Team identifies the backlog items that it believes it can develop during the Sprint • Team formulates a Sprint Goal • Output: • Sprint Goal • Selected Product Backlog items Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  20. Scrum Meetings: Sprint Planning Meeting II Second Meeting: • Who: • Scrum Team • Team may invite others, i.e. Product Owner • Input: • Selected Product Backlog items • Sprint Goal • Latest increment • Team capabilities, business conditions, technology stability • Steps: • Team compiles a list of tasks • Team estimates effort and assigns tasks → Scrum Team self-organizes • Output: • Sprint Backlog Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  21. Scrum Meetings: Sprint Review Meeting • Who: • pigs: Scrum Team, Scrum Master, Product Owner • chickens: management, users, customer(s), other engineers • Input: • Product increment • Steps: • Before: Scrum Master meets with the team to establish an agenda, who will present the results and how they will be presented • Scrum Master gives a concise overview of the Sprint • Team members compare Sprint Goal and selected Product Backlog to the actual results • Product increment is demonstrated • Important: • Sprint Review Meetings are very informal, i.e. Power Point Presentations are forbidden • Sprint Review Meeting is informational, not critical or action-oriented Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  22. Scrum Meetings: Daily Scrums I • Who: • Scrum Master and Team • Chickens & other pigs • Location: • Near the team’s working location • Equipment: table & enough chairs for all team members, white boards, speakerphone • Steps: • Scrum Master gets team members from remote locations on the conference phone • All team members have to answer the following questions: • What have you done since last Daily Scrum? • What will you do between now and the next Daily Scrum? • What got in your way of doing work? Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  23. Scrum Meetings: Daily Scrums II • Rules: • Don’t discuss design or start to solve a problem • Speak as briefly as possible • Don’t be late or you will be charged small fine for tardiness • Goals: • Improve communication • Eliminate other meetings • Identify/remove impediments • Highlight and promote quick decision-making • Continuous monitoring Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  24. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  25. Sprint !!! The Scrum Team has full authority !!! • Mandatory accountabilities • Daily Scrum Meetings • Sprint Backlog → all work is measured and empirically controlled • Factors influencing the amount of work accomplished • Team’s ability to work together • Skills of team members • Work to be performed • Capabilities of the tools • Company standards Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  26. Sprint Backlog Graphs • Perfect Backlog Graph • Working on weekends • Worked the same amount every day • Planning and estimating was perfect Source:Schwaber, K.; Beedle, M. (2001), p. 74f • More likely Backlog Graph • 4-5: no updates • 6-8: more work discovered • 18: Sprint Backlog reduced • 19-30: team motivated, even works on weekend Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  27. Sprint Backlog Graphs Source:Schwaber, K.; Beedle, M. (2001), p. 78 Team didn’t update its estimates while it was working → Management and Scrum Master can’t use graph Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  28. Sprint Backlog Graphs • Backlog Graph for underestimating • 4-8: team discovers new work and re-estimates • 18: remove 700h of work from Sprint Backlog Source:Schwaber, K.; Beedle, M. (2001), p. 79ff • Backlog Graph for overestimating • 1-12: team gets work done faster than expected • 13: decides to deepen the degree of functionality Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  29. Agenda • The term “Scrum” • Quick Overview • Scrum Roles • Scrum Artifacts • Scrum Meetings • Sprint • Why Scrum works 7.1 Noise 7.2 Process Control Model 7.3 Empirical Management Model Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  30. Why Scrum works: Noise • Noise refers to the unpredictable, irregular, nonlinear parts of system development • Noise level/category: • Y-axis: degree of uncertainty about project requirements • X-axis: likelihood that the selected technologies will be able to help accomplish the project’s goals Source:Schwaber, K. (2003), p. 5 Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  31. Why Scrum works: Process Control Model • Defined Process Control Model • Noise category: • simple • Management & Control: • defined process can be reused several times → same results • exercised by defining the process • Empirical Process Control Model • Noise category: • rest • Management & Control: • any attempt to reuse complex process → different outcomes • exercised through frequent inspection and adaptive response Free template from www.brainybetty.com

  32. Why Scrum works: Empirical Management Model • Empirical process control models employs feedback mechanisms to monitor and adapt to the unexpected, providing regularity and predictability • Empirical Management Model: • “I”- Input (requirements, technology, team) • “Process” (Sprint) • “C”- Control unit at Daily Scrums, Sprint Review Meetings • “O”- Output (executable product increment) Source:Schwaber, K.; Beedle, M. (2001), p. 101 Free template from www.brainybetty.com