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Listen & Talk

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  1. Listen & Talk • Read & Explore • Write & Produce • Culture Salon

  2. Lead In Listen & Talk Return to Menu

  3. LISTEN TALK

  4. Listen to the following passage and try to fill the missing words in the blanks. You will hear the passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen carefully for its original idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in the blanks with the exact words you have just heard. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, you should check what you have written. Turn to p. 156, and let’s listen.

  5. First time Wars between states have become less frequent. But in the last decade internal wars have claimed more than 5 million lives, and driven even more people from their homes. At the same time weapons of mass destruction continue to cast their 1)______. The threat of deadly conflict must be tackled 2)______: Pursuing arms reductions. The Secretary-General urges Member States to control small arms transfers more rigorously; and to re-commit themselves to reducing the dangers both of existing 3)______ and of further proliferation. Strengthening 4)______. While traditional peacekeeping had focused mainly on monitoring ceasefires, today’s complex peace operations are, in essence, to assist the parties 5)______ to pursue their interests through political channels instead. Prevention. Conflicts are most frequent in poor countries, especially in those that are ill governed and where there are sharp inequalities between ethnic or 6)______. The best way to prevent them is to promote balanced 7)______, combined with human rights, minority rights and fair political arrangements. Also, illicit transfers of weapons, money, or natural resources must be focused. Protecting the vulnerable. We must 8)______ to enforce international and human rights laws, and ensure that gross violations do not go unpunished. 2nd time

  6. Second time Wars between states have become less frequent. But in the last decade internal wars have claimed more than 5 million lives, and driven even more people from their homes. At the same time weapons of mass destruction continue to cast their 1)______. The threat of deadly conflict must be tackled 2)______: Pursuing arms reductions. The Secretary-General urges Member States to control small arms transfers more rigorously; and to re-commit themselves to reducing the dangers both of existing 3)______ and of further proliferation. Strengthening 4)______. While traditional peacekeeping had focused mainly on monitoring ceasefires, today’s complex peace operations are, in essence, to assist the parties 5)______ to pursue their interests through political channels instead. Prevention. Conflicts are most frequent in poor countries, especially in those that are ill governed and where there are sharp inequalities between ethnic or 6)______. The best way to prevent them is to promote balanced 7)______, combined with human rights, minority rights and fair political arrangements. Also, illicit transfers of weapons, money, or natural resources must be focused. Protecting the vulnerable. We must 8)______ to enforce international and human rights laws, and ensure that gross violations do not go unpunished. 3rd time

  7. Third time Wars between states have become less frequent. But in the last decade internal wars have claimed more than 5 million lives, and driven even more people from their homes. At the same time weapons of mass destruction continue to cast their 1)______. The threat of deadly conflict must be tackled 2)______: Pursuing arms reductions. The Secretary-General urges Member States to control small arms transfers more rigorously; and to re-commit themselves to reducing the dangers both of existing 3)______ and of further proliferation. Strengthening 4)______. While traditional peacekeeping had focused mainly on monitoring ceasefires, today’s complex peace operations are, in essence, to assist the parties 5)______ to pursue their interests through political channels instead. Prevention. Conflicts are most frequent in poor countries, especially in those that are ill governed and where there are sharp inequalities between ethnic or 6)______. The best way to prevent them is to promote balanced 7)______, combined with human rights, minority rights and fair political arrangements. Also, illicit transfers of weapons, money, or natural resources must be focused. Protecting the vulnerable. We must 8)______ to enforce international and human rights laws, and ensure that gross violations do not go unpunished. Check up

  8. Wars between states have become less frequent. But in the last decade internal wars have claimed more than 5 million lives, and driven even more people from their homes. At the same time weapons of mass destruction continue to cast their 1)_______________. The threat of deadly conflict must be tackled 2)_______________: Pursuing arms reductions. The Secretary-General urges Member States to control small arms transfers more rigorously; and to re-commit themselves to reducing the dangers both of existing 3)_________________ and of further proliferation. Strengthening 4)____________________. While traditional peacekeeping had focused mainly on monitoring ceasefires, today’s complex peace operations are, in essence, to assist the parties 5)___________________ to pursue their interests through political channels instead. shadow of fear at every stage nuclear weapons peace operations engaged in conflict

  9. Prevention. Conflicts are most frequent in poor countries, especially in those that are ill governed and where there are sharp inequalities between ethnic or 6)_______________. The best way to prevent them is to promote balanced 7)_____________________, combined with human rights, minority rights and fair political arrangements. Also, illicit transfers of weapons, money, or natural resources must be focused. Protecting the vulnerable. We must 8)_______________ to enforce international and human rights laws, and ensure that gross violations do not go unpunished. religious groups economic development find better ways

  10. With the help of the pictures, discuss the following topics with your classmates. Now let’s talk. What are the two men in the picture doing? How do you think the conflict can be resolved?

  11. With the help of the pictures, discuss the following topics with your classmates. What’s going on in the picture? Do you think it is possible that the world conflict would be resolved by a star war?

  12. With the help of the pictures, discuss the following topics with your classmates. Work with your partners to design different slogans from the one in the picture.

  13. SAMPLES COMMUNICATIVE TASKES Dialogue 1 Dialogue 2 Task 1 Task 2

  14. Dialogue 1: Arab-Israeli Conflicts Mike: Who knows? Look at killings in Africa due to tribal disputes; Protestants and Catholics in Ireland who fight for religious reasons. The list goes on. Wang: It’s just that the suicide bombings are so difficult to understand for those who aren’t Palestinians. It’s one thing to hate the government, it’s another to kill innocent civilians. Mike: Likewise, it’s one thing to work for a good life for one’s own people and it’s another to submit civilians of another country to less-than-humane living conditions such as those of the Palestinians. Wang: True, neither side is better than the other. It is so unfortunate because Israel is such a unique country. Mike: Yes, it means so much to so many; Christians, Muslims, Jews, etc. If only they could work together to develop the economy rather than fight about who owns what! Wang: Well, if all rivals could work together for a common gain, ‘war’ would be a thing of the past! Wang: Man! Another suicide attack in Israel. Will it ever end? Mike: I heard that a Chinese student was among the killed. Wang: I can’t understand why the peace talks between Israel and Palestine always fail. In fact, Palestinians depend highly on Israel for jobs and money, and Israel depends heavily on the Palestinians for many constructions and other labor jobs. Mike: It does seem like both sides are cutting their own noses to spite their faces ― nobody wins like this. Wang: But do you think that they will ever come to terms with each other’s existence? Turn to p. 158, and let’s listen and read.

  15. Dialogue 2: Terrorism ― a Form of Cowardice Mao: I’m not sure about this trip. I have to admit I’m kind of hesitant about flying and travelling in general. Ali: Well, I see that the terrorists have won with you. Their goal was to scare the whole world, to shake us up and have us lose confidence in our own society and governments. Mao: You’re right. That’s what terrorism is all about. It’s uncontrolled and illogical fear. The chance of my plane being hijacked by a terrorist is very small compared to my being hit by a car when I cross a busy downtown street. So why am I hesitant about traveling? Ali: It’s totally understandable. There’s a big difference between someone who willingly kills you for no reason and someone who accidentally hits you when they drive home. Mao: Exactly. It’s like random shootings in some of the big cities right here in the US. People get drunk and just shoot for fun and sometimes they kill you and sometimes they don’t. Ali: That’s the difference between terrorism and war  war requires that soldiers wear uniforms so they can be identified and civilians are supposed to be left out of the conflicts. Mao: Yes, supposed to be, but they often aren’t. Ali: But at least they know who the enemy is. Enemy soldiers can be identified. With terrorism, the enemy doesn’t have the courage to identify themselves and the victims are whoever happens to be around. And that’s why it’s not war as we know it, but ‘terrorism’. Mao: Cowards instilling fear in people who are not in a war-zone. Turn to p. 158, and let’s listen and read.

  16. Situation Two students are talking about suicide bombings by Palestinians and Israel’s retaliation they read about from the newspapers. Role A Role B

  17. Situation Two students are talking about suicide bombings by Palestinians and Israel’s retaliation they read about from the newspapers. Role A Role B You find it difficult to understand Palestinians’ suicide attacks against Israeli civilians. The Palestinians should stop such meaningless sacrifice of their own lives and the lives of innocent Israeli people. Reference

  18. Situation Two students are talking about suicide bombings by Palestinians and Israel’s retaliation they read about from the newspapers. Role A Role B You think that the Israeli government should also give up retaliating against innocent Palestinians because peace can only be brought about by reconciliation rather than retaliation. Reference

  19. Task 1 A: I can't understand why some Palestinians are willing to be suicide bombers. B: Well, don't forget what Israelis have done in blocking off an entire city and shelling Palestinian civilian houses. A: But still, it's one thing to fight against military forces; it's another to set out to kill innocent civilians. B: Yes, but if the Israeli government continues to be aggressive, there won’t be any peace in the region. A: True. If only they could cease attacks and work together toward a peace solution!

  20. Task 1 B: Israel will have to come to terms with returning territory to the Palestinians and the Palestinians will have to make their own concessions, too. A: That is why this is such a difficult conflict ― both sides believe what they’re doing is right. B: And I suppose the average Palestinian civilian is losing hope, and more and more people, including women and young children, are harboring uncontrolled rage against the Israelis.

  21. Task 1 A: Israelis are also living in terror because they never know where and when another bomb will explode. Both sides are cutting their own noses to spite their faces. B: Maybe one day in the future Israelis and Palestinians will lay down their weapons and work together toward a peace solution. A: Wouldn’t that be wonderful? For now though, it’s only a dream.

  22. Situation Two friends are talking about air travel after the September 11 Incident. Role A Role B

  23. Situation Two friends are talking about air travel after the September 11 Incident. Role A Role B You’re scared by the terrorist attack and reluctant to fly in the future, believing that similar incidents are certain to happen again if the root of terrorism is not eliminated. Reference

  24. Situation Two friends are talking about air travel after the September 11 Incident. Role A Role B You’re not pessimistic as your friend. You try to convince him/her that security against terrorists have been very tight, making air traveling much safer now. Reference

  25. Task 2 A: You know, I was planning to go to Vietnam during the next golden week but now I’m not so sure. B: Why’s that? A: Well, I’m kind of hesitant about flying after September 11th. B: Oh yeah … but they’ve really tightened up security measures now. A: They say … B: No really, when my aunt flew back from New York they wouldn’t let her take her nail file onto the plane! Anyway, what are the chances of something happening? Pretty slim, I’d say.

  26. Task 2 A: I know, but if something happened in the air … B: You’re such a pessimist! But if you fly to Vietnam there might be a couple of foreign backpackers on the plane but it’ll be mostly Chinese visitors. A: So? B: I don’t think the terrorists have any particular grudge against the Chinese. I think their goal is to hit multinational targets. A: Well I have to admit that that’s probably true but I’m still not really happy about the idea of flying. B: You could go by train or bus, of course, though it would take much longer. But I think that, statistically, air travel is still the safest form of transport. A: Hmmm…well I might just go to Hainan instead.

  27. The End

  28. Passage A Passage B Return to Menu

  29. Passage A • Think About It • Read About It • Talk About It • Write About It

  30. 1. What are the usual causes of conflicts in the world? Reference: Conflicts in the world are often caused due to the disputes over religion, territory, arms control, trade, terrorism, etc.

  31. 2. Who suffer from the wars and conflicts? And how? Reference: The people of the involved countries. They lose their lives, homes and properties.

  32. 3. What do you think is the solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict? Reference: Open.

  33. Read About It • Language Points • Content Awareness • Language Focus

  34. Return from the Cage It was the open space in Austin that initially overwhelmed me. I couldn’t adjust to it. The ease with which I could get in a car and drive to any place left me bewildered and confused. Where were the military checkpoints? Where were the armed soldiers asking for my identification papers? Where were the barricades that would force me to turn back? I had just returned to the United States, after an absence of 11 years during which I lived in a refugee camp in Bethlehem, the town where Christ was born. I was not used to freedom of movement, nor to going more than a few miles without encountering military checkpoints.

  35. Getting comfortable with my sudden freedom in Austin was going to take time. I had to adjust to no longer feeling like an animal inside a cage. Most days, I felt utterly dazed. I would spend hours sitting on a stone bench at the University of Texas, staring at the squirrels and the birds. The green lawns brought tears to my eyes. My mind would drift to the refugee camp in Bethlehem, and to 3-year-old Marianna, my delightful ex-neighbor. Marianna has never seen a green lawn in her life and has never seen a squirrel. She lives confined to Bethlehem, forced to remain a prisoner behind the checkpoints and the military barricades. The distance between Marianna’s house and Jerusalem is no further than the distance from my South Austin home to downtown. Yet Marianna has never been to Jerusalem and is unlikely to go there anytime in the near future, because no Palestinian can venture into the Holy City without a special Israeli-issued permit, and those permits are almost impossible to come by.

  36. But adjusting to my sudden freedom paled in comparison to overcoming my fears and my nightmares. When I left Bethlehem, the second Palestinian uprising against Israel’s military occupation was already two months under way. The sound of bomb explosions, gunfire and Apache helicopters overhead lingered in my mind. Hard as I tried, I couldn’t shake the sounds away. They were always there, ringing inside my head. Now, in Austin, there were nightmares. I would dream either of friends being shot dead, or see pools of blood spilling from human bodies, or that I myself was the target of gunfire. I would wake up in a sweat, terrified of going back to sleep. During the day, the sound of police or ambulance sirens made me jumpy. Helicopters flying overhead made me uneasy. I had to constantly remind myself that these were most often civilian and not military helicopters. I had to remind myself that the ambulances were not rushing to the wounded demonstrators.

  37. I looked around me, and I wondered if anyone realized, or even knew, that the Apache helicopters being used by the Israeli military to shell innocent Palestinian civilians are actually made in this country! As a writer in Palestine, I had regularly visited bombed-out houses in search of stories. The home of a young nurse sticks out in my mind. A few miles away from the stable in Bethlehem where Christ is said to have been born, her house came under attack by Israeli tanks and was completely burned. I held the remains of some of the tank shells in my two bare hands and read the inscription: “Made in Mesa, Arizona.”

  38. I wanted to stand on a chair and scream this information to everyone walking through the mall. The tear gas civilians inhale in the Palestinian Territories is made in Pennsylvania, and the helicopters and the F-16 fighter planes are also made in the USA. Yet here in this society, no one appears to care that their tax money funds armies that bring death and destruction to civilians, civilians who are no different from civilians in this country. And I worry about the indifference in this country. I worry because someday, young American men will find themselves fighting another Vietnam war — this time possibly in the Middle East — without a notion of what it is they are doing there. And we will have a repetition of history: Mothers will lose sons and wives will lose husbands in an unnecessary war. I have been repeating this warning in all the talks I have been giving in the past nine months. No one took me seriously. I couldn’t understand why young Americans, with their whole futures ahead of them, should go to die in a war they will not understand.

  39. overwhelm v. — to make powerless by using force, or to cause to feel sudden strong emotion • Examples • The terrorists were overwhelmed by the police squad and soon surrendered. • The whole nation was overwhelmed by grief when the space shuttle exploded. More to learn

  40. overwhelming a. — 1) difficult to fight against • Example • She felt an overwhelming urge to tell someone about what had happened.

  41. overwhelming a. — 2) very great or very large • Example • An overwhelming majority have voted in favor of the proposal. Translate the above sentence Key 大多数人都投票支持这项提案。

  42. adjust to — to change slightly, esp. in order to make suitable for a particular job or new conditions • Examples • Her eyes slowly adjusted to the darkness. • A good teacher knows how to adjust his or her methods to suit the needs of the students.

  43. bewilder v. — to confuse, esp. by the presence of many different things at the same time • Examples • A new environment in the kindergarten would bewilder many children. • Arriving in a strange city at night, I felt alone and bewildered.

  44. identification n. — something (such as an official paper) that is proof or a sign of identity • Examples • The reporters were asked to show some identification before the security guards let them in. • Insert your card and put in your Personal Identification Number.

  45. Getting comfortable with my sudden freedom in Austin was going to take time. Paraphrase It would take me some time to adjust to my sudden freedom in Austin.

  46. daze v. — to make confused or unable to think clearly • Examples • The explosion dazed me for quite a while before I recovered. • Everyone was dazed by the news of the sudden death of the president.

  47. confine v. — to keep within some limits • Examples • He is confined to the house by illness. • Could you confine yourself to the subject, please? Translate It is our intention to confine ourselves to the wholesale business of silk goods. Key 本公司专门经营各种丝制品批发业务。

  48. come by — to obtain, to get • Examples • A basketball ticket is not so easy to come by. • How did you come by this black coat? Translate 你前额的伤是怎么搞的? Key How did you come by that wound in the forehead?

  49. But adjusting to my sudden freedom paled in comparison to overcoming my fears and my nightmares. Paraphrase But adjusting to my sudden freedom was not as difficult as overcoming my fears and my nightmares. More to learn

  50. But adjusting to my sudden freedom paled in comparison to overcoming my fears and my nightmares. in comparison to/with — examining or judging against another in order to show the points of likeness or difference • Examples • In comparison with/to the French, the British eat far less fish. • He is a good writer, but he pales in comparison with/to Hemingway. More to learn