Download
swpbs past present future n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future

SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future

107 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut June 25 2011 www.pbis.orgwww.scalingup.orgwww.cber.org

  2. PURPOSE Examination of current SWPBS practices, systems, & outcomes in context of early influences & future directions • Keynote overview: All • Follow-up: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators • Coaching: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators • Brief History • Foundations • Implementation • Example

  3. “Notes to Self”

  4. Problem Statement “We give schools strategies & systems for improving practice & outcomes, but implementation is not accurate, consistent, or durable, & desired outcomes aren’t realized. School personnel & teams need more thanexposure, practice, & enthusiasm.”

  5. Brief PBIS History

  6. Special Education & BD

  7. “Abbreviated” SWPBS History

  8. SWPBS Foundations

  9. “Big Ideas” from Early Years

  10. “Early Triangle”(p. 201)Walker, Knitzer, Reid, et al., CDC

  11. Guskey, 1986, p. 59

  12. SWPBS Logic! Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, scalable, & logical for all students (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

  13. “BIG PICTURE”

  14. 12 Basics

  15. Basics

  16. 1. Invest in prevention

  17. Redesign of teaching environments…not students

  18. 2. Teach, supervise, reinforce

  19. 2. NATURAL CONTEXT 1. SOCIAL SKILL Expectations 3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

  20. 3. Emphasize implementation framework, not curriculum

  21. SWPBS (aka PBIS/RtI) is Framework

  22. Team GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started” Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  23. 4. Integrateoutcome, data, practices, & systems

  24. Integrated Elements Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES 15 Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  25. 5. Invest in multi-tiered prevention logic

  26. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT FEW ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% SOME Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings 23 ALL ~80% of Students

  27. 23 Continuum of Support for ALL Few Some All Dec 7, 2007

  28. Continuum of Support for ALL “Theora” Math Science Spanish Reading Soc skills Soc Studies Basketball Label behavior…not people Dec 7, 2007

  29. Continuum of Support for ALL: “Molcom” Anger man. Prob Sol. Ind. play Adult rel. Self-assess Attend. Coop play Peer interac Label behavior…not people Dec 7, 2007

  30. Implementation Framework

  31. 6. Adopt doable implementation “blueprint” or approach

  32. Implementation Levels State District School Classroom Student

  33. www.scalingup.org Dean Fixsen Karen Blase UNC

  34. SWPBS Implementation Blueprint www.pbis.org

  35. 7. Embed “Response-to-Intervention” logic & principles

  36. RtI

  37. Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Responsiveness to Intervention Academic Systems Behavioral Systems 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90% Circa 1996

  38. Responsiveness to Intervention

  39. Continuum of Support for ALL “IFB School” Literacy School Climate Technology Numeracy Social Studies Writing Attendance Specials Science Align supports Dec 7, 2007

  40. Continuum of Support for ALL “District: Literacy” Trek E.S. Bianchi M.S. Jamis E.S. Masi H.S. Serrota E.S. Look M.S. Look M.S. Davidson M.S. Specials Science Align supports Dec 7, 2007

  41. Student Behavior Teacher Practice CONTEXT or SETTING Continua of Responsiveness & Support District Operations School Reform

  42. 8. Integrateliteracy & behaviorimplementation & supports

  43. Elementary School Suspension Rate PBIS in Virginia

  44. Elementary School Improvements in behavior can be associated with improvements in academic outcomes PBIS in Virginia

  45. Bob Algozzine NC Positive Behavior Support Initiative Schools w/ Low ODRs & High Academic Outcomes Proportion of Students Meeting State Academic Standard Office Discipline Referrals per 100 Students PBIS in North Carolina

  46. Academic-Behavior Connection Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 13, 3-16. Burke, M. D., Hagan-Burke, S., & Sugai, G. (2003). The efficacy of function-based interventions for students with learning disabilities who exhibit escape-maintained problem behavior: Preliminary results from a single case study. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 26, 15-25. McIntosh, K., Chard, D. J., Boland, J. B., & Horner, R. H. (2006). Demonstration of combined efforts in school-wide academic and behavioral systems and incidence of reading and behavior challenges in early elementary grades. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 8, 146-154. McIntosh, K., Horner, R. H., Chard, D. J., Dickey, C. R., and Braun, D. H. (2008). Reading skills and function of problem behavior in typical school settings. Journal of Special Education, 42, 131-147. Nelson, J. R., Johnson, A., & Marchand-Martella, N. (1996). Effects of direct instruction, cooperative learning, and independent learning practices on the classroom behavior of students with behavioral disorders: A comparative analysis. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 4, 53-62. Wang, C., & Algozzine, B. (2011). Rethinking the relationship between reading and behavior in early elementary school. Journal of Educational Research, 104, 100-109.

  47. “Viewed as outcomes, achievement and behavior are related; viewed as causes of each other, achievement and behavior are unrelated. In this context, teaching behavior as relentlessly as we teach reading or other academic content is the ultimate act of prevention, promise, and power underlying PBS and other preventive interventions in America’s schools.” Algozzine, Wang, & Violette (2011), p. 16.

  48. 23 Behavior Continuum Academic Continuum RTI Integrated Continuum Mar 10 2010

  49. 9. Align professional development & support with implementation phase

  50. Where are you in implementation process?Adapted from Fixsen & Blase, 2005