Plagiarism, Citing, & Peer Review - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Plagiarism, Citing, &Peer Review Tosspon’s English 105 Heald College

  2. Obvious Plagiarism • buying, stealing, or borrowing a paper (including, of course, copying an entire paper or article from the Web); • hiring someone to write your paper for you; and copying large sections of text from a source without quotation marks or proper citation.

  3. Cite It • Words or ideas presented in a magazine, book, newspaper, song, TV program, movie, Web page, computer program, letter, advertisement, or any other medium • Information you gain through interviewing or conversing with another person, face to face, over the phone, or in writing • When you copy the exact words or a unique phrase • When you reprint any diagrams, illustrations, charts, pictures, or other visual materials • When you reuse or repost any electronically-available media, including images, audio, video, or other media

  4. DON’T Cite It • Writing your own lived experiences, your own observations and insights, your own thoughts, and your own conclusions about a subject • When you are writing up your own results obtained through lab or field experiments • When you use your own artwork, digital photographs, video, audio, etc. • When you are using "common knowledge," things like folklore, common sense observations, myths, urban legends, and historical events (but not historical documents) • When you are using generally-accepted facts, e.g., pollution is bad for the environment, including facts that are accepted within particular discourse communities, e.g., in the field of composition studies, "writing is a process" is a generally-accepted fact.

  5. Best Practices: Research • Reading and Note-Taking • Interviewing and Conversing • Writing Paraphrases or Summaries • Writing Direct Quotations • Writing About Another's Ideas • Maintaining Drafts of Your Paper

  6. Must Cite in 2 places: In-text citationsWorks Cited Page (also known as ‘parenthetical documentation’) In other words- in parentheses. Your in-text citations work with your bibliography (works cited) page to identify where any quotes or ideas borrowed from another author came from. “References in the text MUST clearly point to specific sources in the list of works cited.” - MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed.

  7. Works Cited page Halio, Jay L., "Elizabethan Age." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Scholastic Library Publishing, 2006. HF-L High School. 1 Apr 2006 <http://gme.grolier.com>. Life in Elizabethan England. Summer 2005. 31 Mar 2006 <http://renaissance.dm .net/compendium>. Pressley, J. M. "An Encapsulated Biography." Shakespeare Resource Center, February 10, 2005. 3 Mar 2006 <http://www.bardweb.net/man.html>. Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1969. Thomas, Heather. The Life in Times of Queen Elizabeth I. 23 Mar 2006. 1 Apr 2006 <www.elizabethi.org>.

  8. In-text citations: Direct Quote In the body of the paper, it looks like this: When Mercutio is wounded, he screams “A plague on both your houses!” referring to both the Capulets and the Montagues (Shakespeare 70). Works Cited Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1969.

  9. Direct Quotes • Direct quotation: • Educators are cautioned that “…labels tend to stick, and few people go back later to document a shifting profile of intelligences” (Gardner 139). • Paraphrase with in-text citation: • Gardner explains that there are difficulties in labeling children with a type of intelligence, including the problem that labels may last, while the assessment may change (139).

  10. How to Paraphrase

  11. Which of these should be cited? On September 11, 2001, the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were attacked by hijacked airplanes. Atta, Binalshibh, al Shehhi, and Jarrah had lived in Germany and were chosen over more established Al Qaeda members due to their exposure to the West and ability to speak English.

  12. B was correct: it is specific and not commonly known How would you cite it? In the text of your paper: Atta, Binalshibh, al Shehhi, and Jarrah had lived in Germany and were chosen over more established Al Qaeda members due to their exposure to the West and ability to speak English (National Commission 160). In the Works Cited: National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004.

  13. Which of THESE do you need to cite? A. “The science labs at East St. Louis High School are 30 to 50 years outdated.” B. When public schools were segregated, conditions were not equal.

  14. A! It is very specific, even w/ out quotes! How would you cite it? In-body: “The science labs at East St. Louis High School are 30 to 50 years outdated” (Kozol 27). In the Works Cited: Kozol, Jonathan. Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools. New York: HarperCollins, 1991. Print.

  15. To Do • Peer Revision • Power Point for Presentation