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Chapter 9 PowerPoint Presentation

Chapter 9

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Chapter 9

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  1. Chapter 9 INFINITE SEQUENCES AND SERIES

  2. Preliminary Information Factorials… Why is 0! = 1 ? …. Well, let me tell you!

  3. Preliminary Information Conditional vs. Absolute Convergence

  4. Preliminary Information Ratio Test Let’s do some examples…

  5. Ratio Test – Example 1

  6. Ratio Test – Example 2

  7. Ratio Test – Example 3

  8. INFINITE SEQUENCES AND SERIES 9.1 Power Series We’ve been studying geometric and arithmetic sequences and series. Now, we will learn about “Power series” and testing for convergence or divergence.

  9. POWER SERIES Equation 1 A power seriesis a series of the form where: • x is a variable • The cn’s are constants called the coefficientsof the series.

  10. POWER SERIES For each fixed x, the series in Equation 1 is a series of constants that we can test for convergence or divergence. • A power series may converge for some values of xand diverge for other values of x.

  11. POWER SERIES The sum of the series is a function whose domain is the set of all x for which the series converges. (Think: the series much converge if f is going to exist, so the domain is defined by the x-values which allow the series to converge).

  12. POWER SERIES Notice that f resembles a polynomial. • The only difference is that f has infinitely many terms.

  13. POWER SERIES For instance, if we take cn= 1 for all n, the power series becomes the geometric series which converges when –1 < x < 1 and diverges when |x| ≥ 1.

  14. POWER SERIES Equation 2 More generally, a series of the form is called any of the following: • A power series in(x – a) • A power seriescentered at “a” • A power series about “a” You will see in a few moments why we say the phrase “centered at a”…

  15. POWER SERIES Notice that, in writing out the term pertaining to n = 0 in these Equations, we have adopted the convention that (x – a)0 = 1 even when x = a.

  16. POWER SERIES Notice also that, when x = a, all the terms are 0 for n≥ 1. • So, the power series in Equation 2 always converges when x = a.

  17. POWER SERIES Example 1 For what values of x is the series convergent? • We will use the “the Ratio Test”. • If we let an as usual denote the nth term of the series, then an= n!xn.

  18. POWER SERIES Example 1 If x≠ 0, we have: • Notice that: (n +1)! = (n + 1)n(n – 1) .... . 3 . 2 . 1 = (n + 1)n!

  19. POWER SERIES Example 1 By the Ratio Test, the series diverges when x≠ 0. • Thus, the given series converges only when x = 0.

  20. POWER SERIES Example 2 For what values of x does the series converge?

  21. POWER SERIES Example 2 Let an = (x – 3)n/n. Then,

  22. POWER SERIES Example 2 By the Ratio Test, the given series is: • Absolutely convergent, and therefore convergent, when |x – 3| < 1. • Divergent when |x – 3| > 1.

  23. POWER SERIES Example 2 Now, • Thus, the series converges when 2 < x < 4. • It diverges when x < 2 or x > 4. • We need to see what happens when x = 2 or x =4.

  24. POWER SERIES Example 2 The Ratio Test gives no information when |x – 3| = 1. • So, we must consider x = 2 and x = 4 separately.

  25. POWER SERIES Example 2 If we put x = 4 in the series, it becomes Σ 1/n, (called the ‘harmonic series’), which is divergent. If we put x = 2, the series is Σ (–1)n/n, which converges because it alternates sign (there is a test called ‘the Alternating Series Test’). • Thus, the given series converges for 2 ≤ x < 4.

  26. USE OF POWER SERIES We will see that the main use of a power series is that it provides a way to represent some of the most important functions that arise in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.

  27. BESSEL FUNCTION In particular, the sum of the power series in the next example is called a Bessel function, after the German astronomer Friedrich Bessel (1784–1846). These functions first arose when Bessel solved Kepler’s equation for describing planetary motion.

  28. BESSEL FUNCTION Since then, these functions have been applied in many different physical situations, such as: • Temperature distribution in a circular plate • Shape of a vibrating drumhead

  29. BESSEL FUNCTION Notice how closely the computer-generated model (which involves Bessel functions and cosine functions) matches the photograph of a vibrating rubber membrane.

  30. Skip Bessel’s functions for 2014…Tuesday Assignment 5/27/20149.1 (I)p 466 QR #1 - 10 (Use a calculator to graph #5-10. Set your window to x=[0, 23.5]… For some reason, it graphs better with decimal window settings!)p 466 EX # 1 – 10

  31. BESSEL FUNCTION Example 3 Find the domain of the Bessel function of order 0 defined by:

  32. BESSEL FUNCTION Example 3 Let an = Then,

  33. BESSEL FUNCTION Example 3 Thus, by the Ratio Test, the given series converges for all values of x. • In other words, the domain of the Bessel function J0 is: (-∞,∞) = R

  34. Continue from here in 2014…

  35. INFINITE SEQUENCES AND SERIES 9.1- Day 2 Finding Power Series for other functions (p 461- 465 FDWK) Assignment 9.1 (II) P. 468 EX # 42 - 52

  36. Finding Power Series for other functions

  37. INFINITE SEQUENCES AND SERIES Chapter 9- Day 3 Partial Sums…. Assignment (need a worksheet)

  38. INFINITE SEQUENCES AND SERIES 9.1 Partial Sums Type stuff here/edit after this slide for 2014

  39. BESSEL FUNCTION Recall that the sum of a series is equal to the limit of the sequence of partial sums.

  40. BESSEL FUNCTION So, when we define the Bessel function in Example 3 as the sum of a series, we mean that, for every real number x, where

  41. BESSEL FUNCTION The first few partial sums are:

  42. BESSEL FUNCTION The graphs of these partial sums—which are polynomials—are displayed. • They are all approximations to the function J0. • However, the approximations become better when more terms are included.

  43. BESSEL FUNCTION This figure shows a more complete graph of the Bessel function.

  44. POWER SERIES In the series we have seen so far, the set of values of x for which the series is convergent has always turned out to be an interval: • A finite interval for the geometric series and the series in Example 2 • The infinite interval (-∞, ∞) in Example 3 • A collapsed interval [0, 0] = {0} in Example 1

  45. POWER SERIES The following theorem, proved in Appendix F, states that this is true in general.

  46. POWER SERIES Theorem 3 For a given power series there are only three possibilities: • The series converges only when x = a. • The series converges for all x. • There is a positive number R such that the series converges if |x – a| < R and diverges if |x – a| > R.

  47. RADIUS OF CONVERGENCE The number R in case iii is called the radius of convergenceof the power series. • By convention, the radius of convergence is R = 0 in case i and R = ∞in case ii.

  48. INTERVAL OF CONVERGENCE The interval of convergenceof a power series is the interval that consists of all values of x for which the series converges.

  49. POWER SERIES In case i, the interval consists of just a single point a. In case ii, the interval is (-∞, ∞).

  50. POWER SERIES In case iii, note that the inequality |x – a| < R can be rewritten as a – R < x < a + R. When x is an endpointof the interval, that is, x = a± R, anything can happen: • The series might converge at one or both endpoints. • It might diverge at both endpoints.