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HOTEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT DIALOGS BETWEEN A TRAINER AND A TRAINEE PowerPoint Presentation
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HOTEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT DIALOGS BETWEEN A TRAINER AND A TRAINEE

HOTEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT DIALOGS BETWEEN A TRAINER AND A TRAINEE

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HOTEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT DIALOGS BETWEEN A TRAINER AND A TRAINEE

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  1. HOTEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT DIALOGS BETWEEN A TRAINER AND A TRAINEE

  2. CONTENTS • Part 1: Course Introduction • Part 2: Review of Hotel Management Theories • Part 3: Hotel Organization Chart and Dept. Functions • Part 4: Operations and Management of Each Dept. • Part 5: How to search for literature via modern IT • Part 6: How to read English literature • Part 7: How to conduct scientific research in social sciencewith analytical software

  3. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry Objectives • Definition of hospitality industry • Full Service Vs. Limited Service Hotels • Nature of hospitality industry • Factors affecting the hospitality industry

  4. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry • Definition of hospitality industry The hospitality industry is part of a large network which includes food services, lodging services, recreation services, travel-related services, and products provided with personal services in conjunction with the above industries.

  5. Part 1 Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry • Full Service Vs. Limited Service Hotels The one ostensible difference between full service and limited service hotels is that full service hotels have an attached restaurant, while limited service hotels do not. If you dig deeper beneath the surface, however, you will find much that differentiate the categories.

  6. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry Restaurants and Food • The defining feature of full service hotels is their restaurant. The Hilton Inn's website exhibits its upscale dining venues, such as the Chandler, AZ location's steakhouse "The Grill" as well as an all-day lobby bar and a cafe offering coffee and chocolate candy. Even if you'd rather stay in your room, full service hotels should feature dedicated room service with an extensive menu. • This doesn't mean limited service hotels never offer food to their guests. The Hampton Inn, for example, offers complimentary breakfast and beverage areas. Not quite a restaurant meal, but they serve free toast, coffee and orange juice.

  7. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry Services and Amenities • As the name might imply, full service hotels offer more in services and accommodations. Guests can expect 24-hour valet service, dry cleaning, heated pools and saunas, well-equipped fitness centers, and guaranteed high-speed wireless Internet access. The rooms should feature high-end furnishings, appliances, and top-of-the-line television with premium cable. • Limited service hotels have plenty to offer as well, but the name also is pretty representative. They have pools, which may not be heated and guests shouldn't expect a spa. These hotels often feature coin laundry rooms and sometimes wireless Internet access as well. Sometimes limited service hotels will have fitness rooms, but the one pictured on the Hampton Inn's website appears only to have a couple of treadmills and a single weight machine.

  8. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry Price • As expected, price is where limited service hotels have an advantage. For example, a one-night stay for two adults at a Days Inn in Phoenix might cost $89 with tax, compared to $155.22 with tax for the Hilton using the same criteria.

  9. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry III. Nature of hospitality industry • Intangible (books, movies, television, postcards, songs, photographs, news stories, and advertising) • Production and consumption at the same time • Non-storage • Fragile • Seasonal • Differentiating in service quality

  10. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry IV. Factors affecting the hospitality industry Some common factors that have an impact on the industries in the hospitality network are: External factors: • Economic climate. The hospitality industry usually reacts quickly to the state of the economy. Spending on travel and leisure activities is often the first item cut from a tight budget. Even business travel declines when money is scarce. In times of a strong economy and bigger budgets, travel and leisure activities expand. • Socioeconomic trends. Social behavior and Lifestyle.

  11. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry • Psychological motives. Psychographic research (that attempts to classify people’s internal motives and behavior), basic motives (influence everyone and include unlearned needs such as thirst, hunger fear, avoidance of pain, etc.), secondary motives (are learned needs and include achievement, desire of power, and other specialized needs ), push/pull theory, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

  12. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry • Technological innovations. The use of technology has enhanced the production of services by making some tasks faster and easier to perform. Technology has also enhanced guest comfort and safety through inventions such as air conditioning and fire alarm systems. It has facilitated the ability to travel by increasing economic prosperity, leisure time, and the efficiency of transportation systems.

  13. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry • Political events. Violence, terrorism and war, health and environmental laws • Government regulations. Government require licenses, inspections, and certificates, and collect taxes and fees.

  14. Part 1:Course Introduction—Introduction to Nature of Hotel Industry Internal factors: • Money • Time • Family lifecycle • Personal health

  15. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories Objectives • Theory of customer satisfaction • Service theater theory • Service value theory based on service profit chain • Service differentiating theory • PROMPT service model

  16. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories I. Theory of customer satisfaction Customer Perception Model

  17. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories II. Service theater theory The service is regarded as a play. Grove and Fisk propose that service has the components like a staged product, such as actors/actresses, audience, facilities, front part and back station, and performance. Actors and actresses (service personnel) are those people who work for audience (customers), and facilities (service environment) are the place for performances or services.

  18. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories III. Service value theory based on service profit chain Model of service value theory based on service profit chain

  19. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories IV. Service differentiating theory There are five differentiations which are as follows: • Differentiation between customer’s perception of service assistance and manager’s perception of the service assistance; • Differentiation between manager’s perception of customer’s service assistance and service standards; • Differentiation between service standards and service delivery; • Differentiation between service provision and external communication; • Differentiation between customer service assistance and customer’s actual experience.

  20. Part 2 Review of Hotel Management Theories V. PROMPT service model

  21. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Objectives • Department functions • Hotel organization chart

  22. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions • Department functions Hotels are organized into large divisions and smaller departments, each one responsible for a particular function or service and at the same time interrelated and dependent on each other. The best services for the guests and the highest job satisfaction for staff is based on clear, prompt communication and genuine cooperation amongst employees in all divisions and departments. The most upscale hotel may attract customers with the latest trend in holiday packages but will not have their loyalty if Bell Service wasn’t notified to take down luggage by a room attendant in Housekeeping Department

  23. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions • Front Office Department is the most visible to the public as it is in direct contact with guests from initial greeting to helping make guests’ stay comfortable / enjoyable to settling the bill prior to departure. • Housekeeping Department Staff clean everywhere, not just guests’ rooms but public areas and back of the house for staff only, hidden from guests eyes.

  24. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Food and Beverage Department • F&B includes all food-service operations such as restaurants, lounges, bars. Breakfast for one tastefully arranged on a tray and taken to a guest’s room is as important as catering to hundreds at banquets in conference rooms.

  25. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Sales and Marketing • S& M Department focuses on analyzing the marketing plan to reach potential customers, then sell and book reservations. Their target is usually business groups and key corporate clients. The Reservation Section normally belongs to S & M Department although sometimes it falls under Front Office. Its main function is to handle reservations by fielding inquiries about room rates, room availability and services offered. Public Relations (PR) is also under the leadership of S & M Director. PR’s main jobs range from making promotional flyers, posters to contacting media, its utmost purpose is to let the public know about the property and encourage use of the services here.

  26. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Accounting Department • This department tracks all incoming revenue and outgoing cash. It balances the books and has close communication with the General Manager and others with power to decide how money is made and spent. Purchasing and Store Room are under the direct control of this department, as well as the Payroll Master who is responsible for employees’ pay. In some hotels, the Kiosk section (or Department Store) is under the management of Financial Controller.

  27. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Engineering or Maintenance Department • The department maintains most of the equipment and machinery on the property and keeps it in working order.

  28. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Security Department • Security department addresses concerns ranging from handling hazardous waste to securing the building against any threats and protecting the property / the staff, and their belongings.

  29. Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions Human Resources Department • The department oversees all matters relating to staff, from recruiting and hiring to setting salary ranges and benefits. It develops policies for dismissal or retirement, is responsible for operations of Staff Canteen, Clinic and Staff dormitory. Staff training is supervised by this department in some properties.

  30. General Manager Resident Manager (AGM) Front Office Housekeeping Engineering Food & Beverage Sales & Marketing Accounting Human Resources Security Part 3 Hotel Organization Chart and Department Functions • Hotel organization chart

  31. Part 4 Operations and Management of Each Dept Chapter 1: Hotel History and Hotel Organization Chapter 2: Front Office Department Chapter 3: Housekeeping Department (1) Chapter 4: Housekeeping Department (2) Chapter 5: Housekeeping Department (3) Chapter 6: Food & Beverage Department (1) Chapter 7: Food & Beverage Department (2)

  32. Part 4 Operations and Management of Each Dept Chapter 8: Food & Beverage Department (3) Chapter 9: Security Department Chapter 10: Sales & Marketing Department Chapter 11: Accounting Department Chapter 12: Engineering Department Chapter 13: Human Resources Department Chapter 14: Trends for Hospitality Industry

  33. Chapter 1: Hotel History and Hotel Organization Unit1: Evolution of Hotel Industry Unit 2: Categories of Hotels Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart

  34. Chapter 1: Hotel History and Hotel Organization Chapter Objectives: • Evolution of hotel industry • Categories of hotels • Basic functions of each department • Responsible area for departmental or divisional heads and above • Hotel organization chart

  35. Stagecoach in England in 1658 caravansary cars planes Unit 1: Evolution of Hotel Industry • Transportation development

  36. Unit 1: Evolution of Hotel Industry • Evolution of hotel industry A. First lodging chain in 1769 in North America B. Multi-unit lodging chain in 20th century C. American hotel tycoons • Ellsworth Statler • Ernest Henderson • Conrad Hilton • Kenmmons Wilson

  37. Unit 1: Evolution of Hotel Industry D. Concept of time-sharing E. Travel and tourism contribution to the economic clout in the world

  38. Unit 2: Categories of Hotels • Hotels classification according to their locations • Downtown hotel • Resort hotel • Suburban hotel • Motel • Airport hotel

  39. Unit 2: Categories of Hotels • Hotels classification according to their rates • Boutique hotel • Luxury / deluxe hotel • Upscale hotel • Mid-tier hotel and motel • Economy / limited service hotel

  40. Unit 2: Categories of Hotels • Hotels classification according to their room structure, configuration and facilities • All-suite hotel • Extended-stay properties / apartment hotel • Resorts and time-share properties • Inns • Casino hotel • Cruise ships

  41. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Basic functions of each department • Front Office • Front Desk • Concierge • Business Center • PABX • Transportation • Kiosk • Duty Manager or Assistant Manager • Executive floor

  42. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Housekeeping • Floor • Laundry • Mini-bar • Lost and Found • Health Club/Fitness Center etc

  43. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Food and Beverage department • Outlets • Kitchens and etc

  44. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Sales & Marketing Department focus on analyzing the marketing plan to reach potential customers, then sell and book reservations. • Accounting Department tracks all incoming revenue and outgoing cash. It balances the books and has close communication with the General Manager and others with power to decide how money is made and spent.

  45. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Engineering or Maintenance Department maintains most of the equipment and machinery on the property and keeps it in working order. • Security Department addresses concerns ranging from handling hazardous (19) waste to securing the building against any threats and protecting the property / the staff, and their belongings.

  46. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Human Resources Department oversees all matters relating to staff, from recruiting and hiring to setting salary ranges and benefits.

  47. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Responsibilities for departmental or divisional heads and above General Manager • Resident Manager • Executive Housekeeper • Front Office Manager • Food & Beverage Manager • Sales and Marketing Director • Financial Controller • Chief Engineer • Chief Security • Human Resources Manager

  48. Unit 3: Hotel Outline and Its Organization Chart • Hotel organization chart (See page 17)

  49. Chapter 2: Front Office Department Unit 1: Guest Check-in and Check-out Procedure Unit 2: Job Descriptions for Concierge Staff and Working Procedures Unit 3: Job Descriptions for Business Center Staff and Working Procedures Unit 4: Job Descriptions for Operators and Working Procedures

  50. Chapter 2: Front Office Department Chapter Objectives: • Guest check-in and check-out procedure • Job descriptions for concierge staff • Working procedures for concierge staff • Job descriptions for Business Center staff • Working procedures for Business Center staff • Job descriptions for Operators • Working procedures for Operators