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Other types of flip-flops and counting

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  1. Other types of flip-flops and counting See Chapter 9 and 10 in Digital principles (Tokheim)

  2. Flip Flops • Flip-flops serve as the elementary units for memory in digital systems. Two features are needed: • The circuit must be able to “hold” either state (a high or low output) and not simply reflect the input at any given time. • But in some circumstances, we must be able to change (to “set” and “reset”) the values.

  3. Remembrance of states past • The way in which the previous state information is held is different for different types of memory • In DRAM (dynamic random access memory), the state (1 or 0) is held by a charge (or lack thereof) remaining on a capacitor • Charges tend to leak off of capacitors, which is why DRAM must be periodically refreshed

  4. SRAM • In SRAM (static random access memory) the history dependence is achieved via a feedback mechanism. • Feedback: the return of part of the output to the input of a mechanism, process or system (source: Random House Dictionary). • SRAM does not need refreshing, making it faster, but it is more expensive; typically it is reserved for caching and other high-speed situations.

  5. RS Flip Flop feedback

  6. Electronics Workbench info on RS flip-flop

  7. RS Flip Flop • The Q output is inverted and fed back in as an input. • Similarly the Q’ output is inverted and fed back in as an input. • As suggested by the names Q and Q’, these outputs are supposed to be inverses of one another.

  8. The hold operation • The S=0, R=0 is the hold “state”, the flip flop keeps its previous outputs • Imagine Q=1 and Q’=0, • Then Not Q’ (which is 1) is ORed with S giving a 1 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is 0) is ORed with R giving a 0 for the Q’ output • The output is the same as the input (no change)

  9. RS Flip Flop (hold) 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

  10. The hold operation • The S=0, R=0 is the hold “state”, the flip flop keeps its previous outputs • Imagine Q=0 and Q’=1, • Then Not Q’ (which is 0) is ORed with S giving a 0 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is 1) is ORed with R giving a 1 for the Q’ output • The output is the same as the input (no change)

  11. The set operation • The S=1, R=0 is the set “state”, the flip flop force Q=1 • Imagine Q=0 and Q’=1, • Then Not Q’ (which is 0) is ORed with S giving a 1 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is now 0) is ORed with R giving a 0 for the Q’ output • The Q output is forced to be (set to) 1

  12. RS Flip Flop (set) 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 Red input Green initial value Blue eventual value

  13. The set operation • The S=1,R=0 is the set “state”, the flip flop forces Q=1 • Imagine Q=1 and Q’=0, • Then Not Q’ (which is 1) is ORed with S giving a 1 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is 0) is ORed with R giving a 0 for the Q’ output • The Q output is forced to be (set to) 1

  14. The reset operation • The S=0,R=1 is the reset “state”, the flip flop forces Q=0 • Imagine Q=0 and Q’=1, • Then Not Q’ (which is 0) is ORed with S giving a 0 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is 1) is ORed with R giving a 1 for the Q’ output • The Q output is forced to be (reset to) 0

  15. The reset operation • The S=0,R=1 is the reset “state”, the flip flop forces Q=0 • Imagine Q=1 and Q’=0, • Then Not Q’ (which is 1) is ORed with S giving a 1 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is now 0) is ORed with R giving a 1 for the Q’ output • Then Not Q’ (which is now 0) is ORed with S giving a 0 for the Q output • The Q output is forced to be (reset to) 0

  16. The undesired operation • The S=1,R=1 is the undesired “state” • Imagine Q=0 and Q’=1, • Then Not Q’ (which is 0) is ORed with S giving a 1 for the Q output • Then Not Q (which is now 0) is ORed with R giving a 1 for the Q’ output • And so on • The Q and Q’ outputs are equal, which is undesired

  17. Level clocking

  18. Level clocking • Adding an additional layer of AND gates and an extra input makes the flip flop “clocked” • What used to be the S input is now S ANDed with CLK, so the set action is now obtained only when S=1 AND CLK=1. • This helps control when the setting occurs and keeps this action in sync with other operations occurring in the circuit.

  19. Edge triggering Two RS flip-flops in a Master-slave arrangement.

  20. Edge Triggering • Feeding the outputs of one clocked RS flip-flop into a second flip-flop in which the clock input is inverted results in an edge-triggered flip flop • The first flip-flop acts as a level clocked flip-flop, that is, setting and resetting occur only when the CLK input is 1.

  21. Edge triggering (cont.) • During this period, the second RS flip-flop is getting the inverse of the CLK and so is in the no change state. • When the CLK goes to 0, the first flip-flop goes into its no change state and the second flip-flop can be set or reset.

  22. Edge triggering • What is setting or resetting the second flip-flop are the outputs of the first flip-flop and they are held fixed. • This way the inputs to the second flip flop can not vary through the course of the clock’s cycle. • Whatever they were when the clock switched is what is important.

  23. JK Flip Flop

  24. Making an RS into a JK • Recall that the R=1, S=1 input into an RS flip flop puts it into the undesired state. • An additional feedback mechanism turns this undesired state of the RS flip flop into the “toggle” state of the JK flip flop.

  25. JK • The inputs into the first AND gate are now • J (used to be S), CLK and Q’ for the upper • K (used to be R), CLK and Q for the lower • Since Q and Q’ are inverses, at most one of the AND gates will yield a 1.

  26. The toggle state • If J and K and the CLK are all 1, the the outcome is determined by Q and Q’ • If Q=1 and Q’=0, then the lower AND gate will produce a 1 and Q’ will be made equal to 1 and Q will be set to 0 (just the opposite of what they were) • This is called the toggle state.

  27. WorkBench JK Help

  28. Counting Note that the least significant bit toggles every row. The next bit toggles every two rows. The higher bit toggles every four rows. Etc.

  29. Counting The middle bit toggles every two rows. More precisely, the middle bit toggles as the least bit changes from 0 to 1 (the negative edge).

  30. Ripple Counter

  31. Ripple Counter Description • The J and K inputs of each flip-flop are all high. Thus each flip-flop will toggle when the clock input goes through a negative edge. • The output of one JK flip-flop becomes the clock input of the next JK flip-flop. The when the first flip-flop’s output changes from 1 to 0, the second flip-flop sees a negative edge at its clock input. And so it toggles in response.

  32. Ripple Counter This flip-flop toggles most often making it the least significant bit.

  33. Program Counter • One use of a counter in a computer is the program counter. The program is stored in memory. After one line of code has been executed, the next line to be executed is typically the next word (or group of words in memory). The program counter “points” to a place in the memory, it is incremented to point to the next location and then it holds that value until the ALU is ready for the next line.