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Bell Ringer #11 9/25 & 9/29 PowerPoint Presentation
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Bell Ringer #11 9/25 & 9/29

Bell Ringer #11 9/25 & 9/29

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Bell Ringer #11 9/25 & 9/29

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  1. Bell Ringer #11 9/25 & 9/29 • We have discussed how eras can have definitive start and end points (prehistory vs. history for example). Today we are learning about the “New Stone Age” and “Old Stone Age.” What do you think is the distinction between the two? When would it start and end? Who do you think would have been around at the time?

  2. Paleolithic vs. Neolithic Level One Individuals & Societies Northview IB Mr. Pentzak http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RM38CLx5M1Q&safe=active

  3. Paleolithic • “Paleo” = old, “-lithic”= stone • Begins 2.6 million years ago with advent of stone tools • Lasts until about 10,000 BCE • Sometimes referred to as “Old Stone Age” • Hominids + Homo Sapiens

  4. “Lucy” • Oldest, most intact hominid ever found • Approx. 3 million years old • Before stone tools! • 3 ½ feet tall • Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy is much easier to say!)

  5. Neolithic • “Neo” = new, “-lithic” = stone • 10,000 BCE to about 2,000 BCE • Called the “New Stone Age” • Only Homo Sapiens live into this era • Otzi

  6. Dwellings • Paleolithic Age- Caves, huts, and skin tents • Neolithic Age- Mud bricks with timber

  7. Lifestyle • Paleolithic • Nomadic • Groups of up to 50 • Tribal • Hunters & Gathers • Neolithic • Sedentary • Permanent settlements • Raise livestock/agriculture • Family structure changes

  8. Tools • Paleolithic • Chipped stone • Wood weapons • Light, dull tools • Neolithic • Polished stone • Sharpened by grinding

  9. Clothes • Paleolithic • Animal skin/hide • Neolithic • Animal skin/hides • Woven garments

  10. Gov’t. • Paleolithic • Tribal/clan • Ruled by elders or the powerful • Matriarchal or patriarchal • Neolithic • Military and religious leaders • Monarchy develops • Less equality among the sexes

  11. Economy • Paleolithic • No private property • Limited trade • Neolithic • Concept of private property emerges • Land, livestock and tools could now be “owned” • Trade networks develop

  12. Health • Paleolithic • Healthier diet of meat and wild plants • Humans were taller and lived longer compared to Neolithic people • Neolithic • Less nutritious diet of mostly grains • People were shorter and had a lower life expectancy • New diseases emerge • Women had more children

  13. Art Paleolithic Neolithic Wall paintings Pottery Bone flute • Cave paintings

  14. Food • Paleolithic • Hunters and Gatherers • Meat, fish, berries • Store only what they can carry • Neolithic • Grew crops such as corn, wheat, beans • Storage for surplus

  15. Main Discovery • Paleolithic • Fire • Rough stone tools • Neolithic • Agriculture • Tools of polished stone

  16. Stone Age Toolkit • Take out a sheet of paper • Please take out a blank sheet of paper. Flip the paper so that the longest side is horizontal. Divide the sheet into ten equal boxes • When the images are projected, please sketch each object in the boxes. • As we go through the interactive, please label each artifact and write a brief description. • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/stone-age-toolkit.html

  17. Homework • Create a flyer that will persuade a human living in 10,000 BCE to either switch to agriculture from hunting and gathering or switch from hunting and gathering to agriculture. Include information from today’s lesson! • This should be colorful, factual, and interesting!

  18. Study Guide • Agriculture • Prehistory vs. History vs. Big History • Hunter Gatherers • Matriarchal • Patriarchal • Nomad • Era • BCE & CE • BC & AD • Calculating/Ordering dates • MR. LIP • Paleolithic • Neolithic • Comparison notes • Otzi • “Lucy” • Hominids • Bipedal • Homo Sapiens • Human Migration • Push/Pull Factors