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Three States of Matter Part I

Three States of Matter Part I

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Three States of Matter Part I

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  1. Three States of MatterPart I

  2. Matter • All matter is made up of tiny particles, called atoms, which cannot be seen even using normal (visible light) microscopes. • Atoms can exist by themselves or be put together to form molecules.

  3. State of Matter • These tiny particles of matter are in constant motion and can interact with one another, which affects their state of matter. • There are 3 basic states of matter: • Solid • Liquid • Gas

  4. Solids • What does it take to be classified as a solid? • Has a constant volume • Has a definite shape • Particles vibrate about fixed points • Particles are closely packed together, which allows more attraction between particles

  5. Solid structure • Many solids are classified as crystalline if the particles are arranged in a regular, repeating pattern (this three-dimensional pattern is called a crystalline lattice).

  6. Crystalline Solids • They have a very specific temperature at which the solid will melt and change to a liquid. • Examples of crystalline solids include: • Ice • Iron • Quartz • Sodium Chloride

  7. Interesting Fact • Sometimes particles of the same type can be arranged into different crystalline structures, which are called allotropes. • Crystallized carbon structures: diamondgraphitebuckminsterfullerene (found in soot) 100 Greatest Discoveries in Chemistry.flv

  8. Amorphous Solids • Solids are classified as amorphous if the particles lack an ordered internal structure (particles are randomly arranged), even though particles are still held in firm position relative to surrounding particles.

  9. Amorphous Solids • These solids do not melt at a specific temperature. They soften gradually over a range of temperatures. • Examples of amorphous solids include rubber, plastic, asphalt, chocolate, taffy, wax, glass, etc.

  10. Particle Behavior in Solids

  11. References: • http://www.biologycorner.com/resources/microscope2.gif • http://serc.carleton.edu/images/usingdata/nasaimages/molecules-air.gif • http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/liquids/character.html • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/13/Solid_liquid_gas.svg/500px-Solid_liquid_gas.svg.png • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Sodium-bromide-3D-ionic.png/220px-3D-ionic.png • http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/vwlessons/lessons/Minerals/Picture2.gif • http://www.idfuel.com/images/012705_TTamorphous_image.gif • http://www.substech.com/dokuwiki/lib/exe/fetch.php?w=&h=&cache=cache&media=crystal_lattice.png • http://www.talismancoins.com/catalog/Blueish_Crystalline_Snowflake.jpg • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3c/Bismuth-crystal.jpg • http://static.newworldencyclopedia.org/thumb/d/d2/Candle_with_burnt_wick.jpg/300px-Candle_with_burnt_wick.jpg • http://steelguru.com/uploads/reports/sss1-29-08-2008.jpg • http://www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry/intro_inorganic/images/diamond.jpg • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f9/Diamond_and_graphite.jpg • http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/images/buckyball.gif • http://www.robertoppelt.com/image/taffy.jpg • http://www.lithiccastinglab.com/gallery-pages/dantheusclovishorsecreektriplrg.jpg • http://www.greenelectron-images.co.uk/sem/images/galena_cleavage_web.jpg • http://glencoe.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/007874637x/514776/fig12_17.jpg • http://fairfieldsfifth.wikispaces.com/file/view/pond_skater.jpg/34240671/pond_skater.jpg • http://www.ramehart.com/surface_tension.jpg • http://www.themetallurgist.co.uk/images/wettability_mmc3.jpg • http://www.davidlnelson.md/Cazadero/CazImages/Meniscus.gif • http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/Images/state.jpg • http://www.800mainstreet.com/1/0001-02-statesofmatter.html • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2f/Cierge_fondant.jpg/419px-Cierge_fondant.jpg

  12. References - Animations: • http://www.media.pearson.com.au/schools/cw/au_sch_whalley_sf1_1/int/matter.html • http://www.visionlearning.com/library/flash_viewer.php?oid=1435&mid=120 • http://www.visionlearning.com/library/flash_viewer.php?oid=1434&mid=120 • http://www.visionlearning.com/library/flash_viewer.php?oid=321&mid=120 • http://www.footprints-science.co.uk/states.htm • http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science-channel/5079-100-greatest-discoveries-chemistry-video.htm • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAY3yISf-24 • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-KvoVzukHo