Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Pauline Muindi and Elizabeth Waithanji UON/ ILRI PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Pauline Muindi and Elizabeth Waithanji UON/ ILRI

Pauline Muindi and Elizabeth Waithanji UON/ ILRI

173 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Pauline Muindi and Elizabeth Waithanji UON/ ILRI

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. A gendered comparison of factors that might influence the adoption of CBPP vaccine in Ijara Sub-County, Northeastern Kenya Pauline Muindi and Elizabeth Waithanji UON/ ILRI

  2. Presentation Outline • Introduction: Gender and technology adoption • Research objective and questions • Key scientific findings: results from sex disaggregated (men only and women only Focus Group Discussions) • Cattle ownership • Gender roles and responsibilities • Benefits of owning cattle • Time use study • Desirable characteristics of an ideal vaccine • Willingness to pay (Individual interviews of men and women) • Conclusion

  3. Introduction • Technology adoption is gendered- women’s adoption rates are often lower than men’s (Doss, 2001) • Technology adoption is driven by three main drivers: political, market and consumer • The following are the consumer associated drivers of technology adoption that vary with gender: • Access: to inputs, services and labour • Acceptability: preferences • Affordability: distribution of costs and benefits

  4. Objective of study and research questions Objective: to compare, by gender, factors that might influence consumer drivers of adoption of the CBPP vaccine technology Research questions: • What are the differences in women’s and men’s: • Time allocation in cattle related and non-cattle related activities • Benefits of owning cattle • Desirable characteristics of an ideal vaccine • Cattle ownership and distribution • Willingness to pay for a new vaccine

  5. Key Scientific Findings:

  6. Access: Time use by gender • For both women and men, activities were similar for the dry and wet season and data, therefore, combined • Men spent 50% of their time on cattle related activities whereas women spent 28% of their time on the same activities • Women spent 36% of their time on non-cattle related activities whereas, men spent 12% of their time on the same activities The more time one spends on cattle related activities the more likely they are to acquire information on cattle related technologies

  7. Access: Benefits of owning cattle by women and men Women FGD Men FGD The more benefits a person derives from an asset they more likely they will invest in technologies that will enhance the assets productivity

  8. Acceptability: Desirable characteristics of an ideal CBPP vaccine according to women and men Women FGD Men FGD In order of frequency of mention the most preferred characteristics of an ideal vaccine according to women were safe, cheap and efficacious: and men: efficacious and safe

  9. Affordability: Cattle ownership and distribution by gender Cattle wealth status determines the ability of an individual to afford cattle related technologies. For the most part women in both FHH and MHH owned less cattle wealth than men

  10. Affordability- willingness to pay by gender Men more than women were willing to pay USD 2.31 (ksh 200) and above Women were willing to pay significantly less money than men USD 2.01 per dose/per year than men USD 2.69

  11. Conclusion Gender matters in relation to consumer associated drivers of technology adoption • Access: • Because men and women benefit from cattle they are both likely to adopt the CBPP vaccine. • Women are likely to have lower access than men to the CBPP vaccine owing to time allocation in gender roles and responsibilities, because women have less interactions with cattle than men • Acceptability: • A vaccine that is safe, efficacious and affordable is more likely to be adopted by both men and women • Affordability: • Both men and women are willing to pay for a vaccine but women are likely to pay less than because they own and control less cattle wealth than men

  12. UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI Acknowledgements