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GOOD FOOD CENTRAL FLORIDA

GOOD FOOD CENTRAL FLORIDA

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GOOD FOOD CENTRAL FLORIDA

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Presentation Transcript

  1. GOOD FOOD CENTRAL FLORIDA Community Input Session Wednesday September 18th 2013 9:30-11:00am

  2. WELCOMINGLisa Portelli, Winter Health Foundation Dave Krepcho, Second Harvest Food Bank

  3. INTRODUCTIONS Share your name, organization, along with the 1-3 words that describe themselves

  4. WHY ARE WE HERE TODAY? • Agenda Overview • Facilitator and participant roles & norms • Desired outcomes

  5. ICEBREAKER What do we have in common?

  6. FOOD SYSTEMS & FOOD POLICY COUNCILS Mary-Stewart Droege, Get Active Orlando (GAO)

  7. OTHER FPC MODELS • http://www.markwinne.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/FPC-manual.pdf • Page 8

  8. COMMUNITY INPUTPurpose • To inform the public about regional food system/policy issues and opportunities; • To establish the process by which the stakeholders can express itself; • To ensure Good Food Central Florida’s related efforts and projects are genuinely
reflective of the region’s values, needs and priorities • Ensuring a robust public involvement process that includes a diversity of perspectives will help GFCF build a stronger regional understanding of food system/policy needs and priorities.

  9. COMMUNITY INPUTBenefits • Diffuses potentially controversial issues; • Allows more people to understand a process or project; • Encourages proactive participation by citizens who will remain involved throughout the life of the project or program; • Establishes good relationships with underserved groups who may not feel their voice matters in the planning process; • Breaks down historical barriers between jurisdictions, neighborhoods, and individuals by ensuring a diverse and representative group are jointly making decisions about the region’s future; • Increases chances of obtaining consensus through the education process that take place when diverse views are expressed and all given equal weight in the planning process.

  10. WORLD CAFÉ Conversations • What is already going on in the community regarding food? • What do we wish we had more of?
 • What do we want to achieve?
 • What resources to we already have, and what ones do we need?

  11. GFCF POTENTIAL STRATEGIES Nutrition Food-related health issues • Home Economics-Food education • Simplify healthy food messaging • Obesity Prevention • Nutrition Education->Policy Impact Sustainable farming & Community Gardens • Research and regulation • Empowerment of farmers Equitable access to healthy food • Eliminate barriers to food systems • Address food deserts-how to define it and barriers • Access to healthy food for low-income *transportation disadvantaged” • Swamps & Mirages Economic development related to food • Integration of Agriculture, food policy, food choices into land use, transportation, etc • Influence and activate Statewide Food Policy Council Other • City/County procurement practices

  12. CLOSING-CHECK OUT One word close out of guests that reflect what they are taking away from the meeting

  13. THANK YOU

  14. WEBINAR with MARK WINNE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 9TH11:00-12:30PM

  15. Steering Committee Strategy Session #1 Wednesday September 18th 2013 12:15-4:00pm

  16. Agenda Overview

  17. COMMUNITY INPUT Debrief

  18. VALUES EXERCISE • Core values are what support the vision, shape the culture and reflect what an organization values.  • They are the essence of the company’s identity – the principles, beliefs or philosophy of values

  19. MISSION & VISIONStatements

  20. MISSION STATEMENTS • Your mission statement answers the questions: • Who are you, as an organization? • Why do you exist?
 • What do you do? • Who do you serve? • It should include: Purpose – A sentence that describes the end result the organization seeks. Purpose statements usually include two phrases: • An infinitive that indicates a change in status, such as -- to increase, to decrease, to prevent, to eliminate. • An identification of the problem or condition to be changed.

  21. VISION STATEMENTS • Some criteria to guide in developing and assessing the effectiveness of a vision statement are: • It answers the question, “What will success look like?” • It is compelling, • It challenges and inspires the group to stretch its capabilities 
to achieve its purpose, • It focuses first on the client to be served or impacted, • It describes what the organization will look like when 
functioning effectively.

  22. BREAK

  23. GOAL SETTING • Address food deserts • Nutrition Education->Policy Impact • Obesity Prevention • Home Economics • Elevation of Agriculture, food policy, food choices into land use, transportation, etc. • A world where food is valued and leaders are thoughtful about it • City/County procurement practices • Eliminate barriers to food systems • Research and regulation • Access to healthy food for low-income *transportation disadvantaged • Empowerment of farmers • Influence and activate Statewide Food Policy Council • Simplify healthy food messaging

  24. NEST STEPS/SUMMARY

  25. WHAT WORKEDWHAT YOU WOULD CHANGE

  26. SEE YOU OCTOBER 10TH!8:30-12:30PM