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Affordable warmth

Affordable warmth

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Affordable warmth

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  1. Multiple benefits of energy efficiencyFuel poverty and climate action Dublin, 6 March 2017Brenda Boardman

  2. Affordable warmth } { 10% of income for all energy services Energy efficiency of the dwelling 24 hour mean internal temperature of 18°C (+ other energy services)

  3. Heating expenditure for a low income, pensioner couple in council accommodation Present €6.65 For adequate warmth a) existing poorly insulated home • poor heating system €16.15 + €9.50 • efficient heating system €10.35 + €3.70 b) well insulated home • efficient heating system €5.65 - €1.00

  4. Low income + poor housing Low income High income Energy inefficient housing Energy efficient housing

  5. Households in fuel poverty by BER category

  6. Defining fuel poverty vs identifying fuel poor • Lot of options for definition • OK for modelling, often useless on the doorstep • Monitoring and delivery are two very different tasks • Start with how to identify and who does it, eg • Individual properties (low rating) • Individual people / households (eg ill health) • Areas of deprivation (area based) Presentation title, edit in header and footer (view menu)

  7. Fuel poverty and health • Strong links between mental and physical ill health and fuel poverty • Tackling fuel poverty a key preventative measure • Work with health service for referrals – they know the people and their addresses, you don’t • Or doctor’s surgeries to identify areas of concentrated ill health • Don’t expect health services to pay for measures

  8. Multiple benefits of energy efficiency IEA 2014 Presentation title, edit in header and footer (view menu)

  9. Synergies: fuel poverty and climate change • Both about capital investment • Upgrade homes to super energy-efficient, low-carbon (A1/B2) • Climate change @ 50,000 pa x 32 years • Fuel poverty @ 50,000 pa x 6 years

  10. Which policies: regulation or money? • Regulate – mandatory minimum standards, all tenures, over time • Or grants for those with no money • Are you giving grants to poor people, even when they have rich landlords? • Or are you making the rich landlord improve the property?

  11. Raising the money for grants • Is this from general taxation, via The Treasury? • Progressive, as poor often pay no tax • Or is it being funded by the utilities, via all customers? • Regressive, fuel poor contribute, whether or not they benefit • Recycle money from fuel allowances? • How quickly will you upgrade all fuel poor homes? • To what standard? • So, what is the budget?

  12. How to deliver? • Area-based approaches • The most-trusted agency = local authority • Takes responsibility for delivery • Manages installers • Works with community groups • Provides single point of contact for housing and health • So, give each local authority the duty to reduce fuel poverty

  13. Thank you Brenda.Boardman@ouce.ox.ac.uk