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Phenomenology and FNPs

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Phenomenology and FNPs

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  1. Phenomenology and FNPs Camelia Stefanescu MSN 510 Dr. Judith Chodil

  2. Phenomenology – objectives and knowledge • Direct investigation and description of phenomena as experienced in life. • It is to give voice to human experience just as it is. • Strives to understand experience rather than provide causal explanation of that experience. • All phenomenological descriptions can be challenged by other phenomenological descriptions. • A full explanation of the world (which is dynamic) is not possible, nor it is possible to obtain causal certainty and inference, or law-like statements.

  3. Phenomenology – methods • Coliazzi and Giorgi apply a step-wise set of procedures during data interpretation. • Van Manen claims that all phenomenological descriptions have an interpretative element; uses a discovery-oriented, step-less approach. • Phenomenological descriptions are validated by mutual recognition given by the “phenomenological nod”, which says “yes, this is an experience I could have”.

  4. FNP practice – present and future • Practically relevant knowledge is action knowledge, pertinent to the specific situation. • The NP can describe/interpret her direct experiences, or the ones of a cooperating patient. • Some experiences cannot be accessible directly (unconscious patient, neonate), but the indirectly involved people’s experiences can be used (unconscious patient’s spouse, neonate’s father). • Phenomenological inquiry can meet the needs of nurse researchers who focus on aesthetics, personal ways of knowing, on questions of being, and on multiple realities. • Phenomenological approach can increase understanding of human experience, and can inspire a change of action on the basis of that understanding.

  5. References • Coliazzi, P.F. (1978) Psychological research as the phenomenologist views it. Existential - Phenomenological Alternatives for Psychology (Valle R.S & King M.) Plenum, New York, 48-71. • Van Manen, M. (1983). Invitation to phenomenology and pedagogy. Phenomenology and Pedagogy, 1. • Van der Zalm, J.(1999). Hermeneutic-phenomenology:providing living knowledge for nursing practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 31(1), 211-218.