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Decrease-and-Conquer Approach

Decrease-and-Conquer Approach

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Decrease-and-Conquer Approach

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  1. Decrease-and-Conquer Approach Lecture 06 ITS033 – Programming & Algorithms Asst. Prof. Dr. Bunyarit Uyyanonvara IT Program, Image and Vision Computing Lab. School of Information, Computer and Communication Technology (ICT) Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (SIIT) Thammasat University http://www.siit.tu.ac.th/bunyaritbunyarit@siit.tu.ac.th02 5013505 X 2005

  2. ITS033 Topic 01-Problems & Algorithmic Problem Solving Topic 02 – Algorithm Representation & Efficiency Analysis Topic 03 - State Space of a problem Topic 04 - Brute Force Algorithm Topic 05 - Divide and Conquer Topic 06-Decrease and Conquer Topic 07 - Dynamics Programming Topic 08-Transform and Conquer Topic 09 - Graph Algorithms Topic 10 - Minimum Spanning Tree Topic 11 - Shortest Path Problem Topic 12 - Coping with the Limitations of Algorithms Power http://www.siit.tu.ac.th/bunyarit/its033.php and http://www.vcharkarn.com/vlesson/showlesson.php?lessonid=7

  3. This Week Overview • Problem size reduction • Insertion Sort • Recursive programming • Examples • Factorial • Tower of Hanoi

  4. Decrease & Conquer: Concept ITS033 – Programming & Algorithms Lecture 06.1 Asst. Prof. Dr. Bunyarit Uyyanonvara IT Program, Image and Vision Computing Lab. School of Information, Computer and Communication Technology (ICT) Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (SIIT) Thammasat University http://www.siit.tu.ac.th/bunyaritbunyarit@siit.tu.ac.th02 5013505 X 2005

  5. Introduction • The decrease-and-conquer technique is based on exploiting the relationship between a solution to a given instance of a problem and a solution to a smaller instance of the same problem. • Once such a relationship is established, it can be exploited either top down (recursively) or bottom up (without a recursion).

  6. Introduction • There are three major variations of decrease-and-conquer: 1. Decrease by a constant 2. Decrease by a constant factor 3. Variable size decrease

  7. Decrease by a constant • In the decrease-by-a-constant variation, the size of an instance is reduced by the same constant on each iteration of the algorithm. • Typically, this constant is equal to 1

  8. Decrease by a Constant

  9. Decrease by a constant • Consider, as an example, the exponentiation problem of computing an for positive integer exponents. The relationship between a solution to an instance of size n and an instance of size n - 1 is obtained by the obvious formula: an= an-1 x a • So the function f (n) = an can be computed either “top down” by using its recursive definition • or “bottom up” by multiplying a by itself n - 1 times.

  10. Decrease by a Constant Factor • The decrease-by-a-constant-factor technique suggests reducing a problem’s instance by the same constant factor on each iteration of the algorithm. • In most applications, this constant factor is equal to two.

  11. Decrease by a Constant Factor

  12. Decrease by a Constant Factor • If the instance of size n is to compute an, the instance of half its size will be to compute an/2, with the obvious relationship between the two: an= (an/2)2. • But since we consider instances of the exponentiation problem with integer exponents only, the former works only for even n. If n is odd, we have to compute an-1 by using the rule for even-valued exponents and then multiply the result by

  13. Variable Size Decrease • the variable-size-decrease variety of decrease-and-conquer, a size reduction pattern varies from one iteration of an algorithm to another. • Euclid’s algorithm for computing the greatest common divisor provides a good example of such a situation.

  14. Decrease & Conquer: Insertionsort Lecture 06.2 ITS033 – Programming & Algorithms Asst. Prof. Dr. Bunyarit Uyyanonvara IT Program, Image and Vision Computing Lab. School of Information, Computer and Communication Technology (ICT) Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (SIIT) Thammasat University http://www.siit.tu.ac.th/bunyaritbunyarit@siit.tu.ac.th02 5013505 X 2005

  15. Insertion Sort • we consider an application of the decrease-by-one technique to sorting an array A[0..n - 1]. • Following the technique’s idea, we assume that the smaller problem of sorting the array A[0..n - 2] has already been solved to give us a sorted array of size n - 1: A[0]= . . . = A[n - 2]. • How can we take advantage of this solution to the smaller problem to get a solution to the original problem by taking into account the element A[n - 1]?

  16. Insertion Sort • we can scan the sorted subarray from right to left until the first element smaller than or equal to A[n - 1] is encountered and then insert A[n - 1] right after that element. =>straight insertion sort or simply insertion sort. • Or we can use binary search to find an appropriate position for A[n - 1] in the sorted portion of the array. => binary insertion sort.

  17. Insertion Sort

  18. Insertion Sort

  19. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R U T E F O R C E

  20. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R U T E F O R C E

  21. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R U T E F O R C E

  22. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R U T E F O R C E

  23. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R T U E F O R C E

  24. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R T U E F O R C E

  25. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R T E U F O R C E

  26. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B R E T U F O R C E

  27. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E R T U F O R C E

  28. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E R T U F O R C E

  29. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E R T F U O R C E

  30. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E R F T U O R C E

  31. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E F R T U O R C E

  32. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E F R T U O R C E

  33. unsorted sorted active Insertion Sort Demo B E F R T O U R C E

  34. Insertion Sort

  35. Analysis –Worst Case • The basic operation of the algorithm is the key comparison A[j ]> v. • The number of key comparisons in this algorithm obviously depends on the nature of the input. • In the worst case, A[j ]> v is executed the largest number • of times, i.e., for every j = i - 1, . . . , 0. Since v = A[i], it happens if and only if A[j ]>A[i] for j = i - 1, . . . , 0.

  36. Analysis –Worst Case • In other words, the worst-case input is an array of strictly decreasing values. The number of key comparisons for such an input is

  37. Analysis – Best Case • In the best case, the comparison A[j ]> v is executed only once on every iteration of the outer loop. It happens if and only if A[i - 1] = A[i] for every i =1, . . . , n-1, i.e., if the input array is already sorted in ascending order. • Thus, for sorted arrays, the number of key comparisons is

  38. Decrease & Conquer: Recursive Programming Lecture 06.3 ITS033 – Programming & Algorithms Asst. Prof. Dr. Bunyarit Uyyanonvara IT Program, Image and Vision Computing Lab. School of Information, Computer and Communication Technology (ICT) Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (SIIT) Thammasat University http://www.siit.tu.ac.th/bunyaritbunyarit@siit.tu.ac.th02 5013505 X 2005

  39. Concept of Recursion A recursive definition is one which uses the wordor concept being defined in the definition itself

  40. = (n-1)! Factorials • How is this recursive? n! = n × (n-1) × (n-2) × … × 3 × 2 × 1 • So: n! = n × (n-1) ! • The factorial function is defined in terms of itself (i.e. recursively)

  41. Recursive Calculation of Factorials • In order for this to work, we need a stop case (the simplest case) • Here: 0! = 1 n! = n × (n-1)!

  42. This is Iterative Problem Solving

  43. but, this is Recursion

  44. Iterative Solution n! = n  (n-1)  (n-2)  …  1, if n > 0 long Factorial(intn) { long fact = 1; for (int i=2; i <= n; i++) fact = fact * i; return fact; }

  45. 1, if n = 0 n! = n  (n-1)!, if n > 0 Programming with Recursion Recursive definition - definition in which something isdefined in terms of a smaller version of itself, e.g.

  46. 1, if n = 0 n! = n  (n-1)!, if n > 0 Programming with Recursion Stopping Condition in a recursive definition is the case for which the solution can be stated nonrecursively General (recursive) case is the case for which the solution is expressed in terms of a smaller version of itself.

  47. Stopping cond. recursive case Recursion Solution longMyFact(intn) { if (n == 0) return 1; return (n * MyFact(n – 1)); } Recursive call- a call made to the function from within the function itself;

  48. 6 MyFact(3) 2 3*MyFact(2) 1 2*MyFact(1) 1 1*MyFact(0) How does this work? int x = MyFact(3); int MyFact (int n) { if (n == 0) // The stop case return 1; else return n * MyFact(n-1); } // factorial

  49. Example #1 Iterative programming #include <vcl.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> void iforgot_A(int n) { for (int i=1; i<=n; i++) { printf("%d, I will remember to do my homework.\n",i); } printf("Maybe NOT!"); } void main() { iforgot_A(5); getch(); } >> iforgot_A(5) 1, I will remember to do my homework. 2, I will remember to do my homework. 3, I will remember to do my homework. 4, I will remember to do my homework. 5, I will remember to do my homework. Maybe NOT!

  50. Example #2 Recursive programming #include <vcl.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> void iforgot_B(int n) { if (n>0) { printf("%d, I will remember to do my homework.\n",n); iforgot_B(n-1); } else printf("Maybe NOT!"); } void main() { iforgot_B(5); getch(); } >> iforgot_B(5) 5, I will remember to do my homework. 4, I will remember to do my homework. 3, I will remember to do my homework. 2, I will remember to do my homework. 1, I will remember to do my homework. Maybe NOT!