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Total Recall

Total Recall

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Total Recall

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  1. Hannah Pohlmann Grade 9 Total Recall

  2. Problem • Does one’s environment and age affect how well he or she studies/memorizes? • Something I use every day • Parents and rules

  3. Research • Memory in General • Short-term (used in this experiment) • Part of brain is the hippocampus, which is located inside the temporal lobes • Things remembered (such as words) and then quickly forgotten • Easily disrupted • Information is converted into long-term from short-term • Amnesia if there isn’t enough time to convert

  4. Research • Effects of Distraction on Memory–Tyler Jewett • Hypothesized that “the ability to recall words decreased as distraction increased” • Ability to ignore increases with age • Adults did about the same, but children did worse with a distraction • Do social factors and age affect memory?-Oxford • Hypothesized that: Memory/ Cognitive function is affected by lifestyle, family and other relationships, and a person’s feeling of control over his or her life • The young, healthy, educated, and people who feel they have control over their lives did the best • Most memory is based in confidence

  5. Research • WSJ and Wiley Online Library • Music and random digits hampered results • Preference made no difference • Did better with repeated digit and silence • Philly. Com • Hearing half of a conversation distracts much more than hearing a whole conversation • Random occurrences cause distraction, not just words by themselves

  6. Research • Science Direct • Noise from elevated train affects reading skills of children • Access Excellence-Brenda Brown • Similar to my project • Designed experiment using different conditions to test effects on memory

  7. Hypothesis • If one’s environment and age change, then how well he or she studies or memorizes will change too.

  8. Materials • Stopwatch • Informed consent permission slips • Volunteers • Lists of words • Music • TV • Chairs • Quiet rooms • Blank paper • Pencils

  9. Procedure • Wrote up 4 different lists of 30 words • Found 15 volunteers • Had volunteers memorize words for 2 minutes under different conditions • Using a different list every time • After each 2 minute interval, saw how many words the volunteers remembered • Giving them 2-3 minutes to recall what they memorized and write it down on provided paper • Correct lists • Checking for errors and or any patterns in memorization • Compared results to see how the volunteers were affected

  10. Variables • Independent: Environment used • Dependent: The person’s memory • Control: quiet and regular chair • Constant: duration of time used to recall and memorize the information and word lists

  11. Data (Environment)

  12. Data (Environment)

  13. Data (Environment)

  14. Data (Age)

  15. Data (Age)

  16. Data (Age)

  17. Data (Age)

  18. Conclusion • Teens are the best • Teens and children were not affected by environment • TV affected adults • All environments-teens are better than children • The adults are the same as the children except in the music environment • TV-Teens are best • Partially supports hypothesis • Results may have differed with a larger study • Subjects also got tired as the tests continued

  19. Thanks to: • Those listening, Teachers, Parents and the following sources: • Avril, Tom. "Half a conversation is worse than none." Philly.com. Philly.com, 27      Sept. 2010. Web. 26 Jan. 2011. <http://articles.philly.com/2010-09-27/      news/24978825_1_task-conversation-dot>. • Bronzaft, Arline L. "The effect of a noise abatement program on reading      ability." ScienceDirect. Elsevier, 8 July 2005. Web. 26 Jan. 2011.      <http://www.sciencedirect.com/ science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WJ8-4GK8NN5-3&_user=10&_coverDate=09/30/      1981&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_ac     ct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=4a87cdf73e7c1868fc12ad5281f      a10e3&searchtype=a>. • Brown, Brenda. "Effects of Environment on Memory." Access Excellence . National      Health Museum, n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2011. <http://www.accessexcellence.org/      AE/AEC/AEF/1996/brown_memory.php>. • Jewett, Tyler. "Effects of Distraction on Memory." Associated Content. Yahoo, 26      Nov. 2008. Web. 1 Feb. 2011. <http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/      1222108/effects_of_distraction_on_memory.html?cat=72>.

  20. Thanks To: • Perham, Nick, and Joanne Vizard. "Can preference for background music mediate      the irrelevant sound effect?" Wiely Online Library. JohnWiley & Sons, Ltd.,      2010. Web. 26 Jan. 2011. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/      acp.1731/abstract>. • Scott, Jerry. "Zits." Comic strip. chron. The Houston Chronicle, 25 Jan. 2011.      Web. 26 Jan. 2011. <http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/ showComick.mpl?date=20110125&name=Zits>. • Singer-Vine, Jeremy. "Music Impairs Certain Acts of Memorization." The Wall Street Journal 9 Aug. 2010: 1. The Wall Street Journal. Web. 26 Jan. 2011.      <http://online.wsj.com/article/      SB10001424052748703988304575413231864435268.html?mod=WSJ_hps_sections_health#arti     cleTabs%3Darticle>. • Stevens, Fred C.J., et al. "How ageing and social factors affect memory." CBS MoneyWatch.com. CBS Interactive Inc., July 1999. Web. 1 Feb. 2011.      <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2459/is_4_28/ai_55450324/pg_6/      ?tag=content;col1>.