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21 st Century Skills

21 st Century Skills

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21 st Century Skills

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  1. 21st Century Skills Blog Wiki Laurel Fish Delicious Blog Web 2.0 Podcast RSS
  2. Web 2.0 is basically changing the internet from a vast collection of websites to a full-fledged computing platform that offers any application you need and the ability to collaborate in real time -- online, 24 hours a day. J Dorman
  3. Social networking in the classroom can be used to: get to know your students better; to let students submit homework share projects access calendars or homework assignments even to reach out to parents. http://www.edutopia.org/digital-generation-youth-network-literacy
  4. Blogs, wikis, podcasts, feeds, ...  provide the capabilities to do variations on the same basic functions.  Most of these tools permit : Creating and editing chunks of text Making those chunks accessible to others on a Web page Creating and editing comments about those chunks Making those comments accessible on a Web page Adding pictures, sound recordings, and other kinds of media files to some of the chunks Organizing the chunks.  Controlling who has access to the chunks Enabling people to receive notifications about new items or new modifications of old items The answers to the following questions determine which tools (blogs, wikis, podcasts, feeds, ...) are likely to be helpful with the educational purpose you have in mind.
  5. Advantages of Using Online Tools Short learning curve – Simple to use, web 2.0 tools are very intuitive. Cost Effective Always available The 4 C’s of Digital Learning Communication Work can be created and shared. Tools to accomplish this include blogging, microblogging (Twitter), and podcasting. Collaboration Online tools allow students to easily collaborate. Creativity Tools such as digital storytelling, time line creators, online art and comic book creators, students can accomplish the goals of education and creativity at the same time. And, it is available to share with a real audience. Community Social networking is standard use for students and, has a positive application for use in education. Ning is an example of a social networking tool that lends itself to use in the classroom. Even Facebook has educational value.
  6. Young Minds, Fast Times: The Twenty-First-Century Digital Learner How tech-obsessed iKids would improve our schools. by Marc Prensky http://www.edutopia.org/ikid-digital-learner-technology-2008 Unlike in the corporate world, where businesses spend tens of millions researching what their consumers really want, when it comes to how we structure and organize our kids' education, we generally don't make the slightest attempt to listen to, or even care, what students think about how they are taught. "There is so much difference between how students think and how teachers think," offered a female student in Florida. A young man commented, "You think of technology as a tool. We think of it as a foundation -- it's at the basis of everything we do." Kids have always been bored in school. But I think now it's different. Some of the boredom, of course, comes from the contrast with the more engaging learning opportunities kids have outside of school. Others blame it on today's "continuous partial attention" . CPA is the need "to be a live node on the network," continually text messaging, checking the cell phone, and jumping on email. "It is an always-on, anywhere, anytime, anyplace behavior that involves an artificial sense of constant crisis," she writes. "We pay continuous partial attention in an effort not to miss anything.“
  7. NCTE believes that 21st-century readers and writers need to: Develop proficiency with the tools of technology Build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multimedia texts Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments. SOURCE: www.ncte.org/about/gov/129117.htm
  8. www.sutton.gov.uk/childrenservice/childrensin...
  9. Digital natives prefer their graphics before their text. J. Dorman
  10. Viki Davis What is Web 2.0 http://movies.atomiclearning.com/movie/k12/32612/play
  11. Web 1.0  Web 2.0
  12. Current use of technology in education is primarily Web 1.0. One way use of Internet –primarily used for research. Hardware may include laptop, desktop, projector, SmartBoard, computer lab.
  13. We currently use more just-in-time technology. This includes, video streaming, online interactives, and PowerPoint presentations for display to the entire class.  
  14. Web 2.0 approach - two way communication - interactive. What: Collaborative, Participatory, Creative, Problem Solving, Social (Educational) Networking, web only applications, Share, Access, Conference, etc. “The ability to easily create, access, and share information via an Internet-connected computer is the power of Web 2.0.” Sept. 2007 connected Newsletter
  15. Examples of Web 1.0 vs. Web 2.0
  16. Definition of Terms
  17. A Few Web 2.0 Tools There are literally thousands of Web 2.0 applications. Not all of them are appropriate for education, but many of them are. I have listed a few sites at the end of this presentation.
  18. More Ways to Use Web 2.0 on line cartoon creation blogging Digital story telling - http://www.digitales.us/index.php - possible site escrapbooking pod casting Google Docs collaboration web cam and telecollobation - videoconferencing visualizations and interactive web sites video creation teacher tube and school tube wiki simulation
  19. Terms
  20. Web 2.0 http://www.schooltube.com/video/5004/Jing-Along-With-US Video on Web 2.0 – Atomic Learning http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/home/ http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/web20 Interaction
  21. Web log or journal type application. Blog Share your thoughts with others – a huge amount of others http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/ Common Craft video of the definition of a blog http://www.commoncraft.com/blogs
  22. "Blog stands for Web-log, an informal personal Website. Thousands of people blog every day. (Blog is both a noun and a verb.) I’ve blogged for 18 months, and I’m convinced that blogs are destined to become a powerful, dirt-cheap tool for e-learning and knowledge management. "A blog is defined as a Website with dated entries, usually by a single author, often accompanied by links to other blogs that the site’s editor visits on a regular basis. Think of a blog as one person’s public diary or suggestion list. Early blogs were started by Web enthusiasts who would post links to cool stuff that they found on the Internet. They added commentary. They began posting daily. They read one another’s blogs. A community culture took hold.
  23. How to set up a blog in your classroom. Decide the Main Use for Your Blog Classroom management:Use a blog to post assignments, handouts, and notices. You can also put up study notes and have students take turns summarizing what happened in school that day. Learning journal:uses individual or small-group blogs as a place for students to "write reflectively" on what they learned from a particular assignment and how they might do better next time. Online notebook Class discussion:Assign blogs to small groups, or set up a single blog for the whole class. You may post entries for discussion, or have individual students and guest bloggers post entries. Personal expression:Give students individual blogs for posting whatever they want.
  24. Decide How to Grade Work Use blogs to post homework for traditional evaluation. "An assignment might be, 'After discussing a short story in class, post an entry on your blog, commenting either on the class discussion or the story itself. Set Up Your Blog(s) At one of the free blog-hosting sites, such as Blogger, setting up a blog takes only a few minutes. Just follow the instructions (create an account, and choose a name and template). If you want to limit accessibility, list the email addresses of those allowed to see it. However, some schools have blocks on Internet access, so you may want to subscribe to a service such as Edublogs or Class Blogmeister, which have additional features. Protect Your Students If your classroom blog is publicly accessible, make sure students use first names only and do not provide personal identifying details. You will also have to set clear guidelines on what is appropriate regarding content and comments.
  25. Constructing Constructiveness: A Sample Blogging Lesson Plan Following is a suggested lesson plan teacher KonradGlogowski created for eighth-grade students on constructive blogging procedures. Grade level: EightSubject: Language artsLesson title: "Writing Constructive Comments in a Blogging Community." Objective: To help students identify the main characteristics of a constructive blog response and allow them to compose such responses. Resources needed: Student comments (short and constructive) posted in the classroom blogging community. Procedure: Inquiry approach, Socratic approach, class discussionThe teacher will spark a discussion on blog responses by using specific, constructive, student-generated examples from the classroom blogging community. Using the Socratic method, the teacher will guide a discussion on what makes these comments helpful. The teacher will also use short, congratulatory comments from the class blogosphere to initiate discussion about how these types of responses compare to other, more constructive, comments. The teacher will ask students who received mostly congratulatory comments to speak to the class about the effectiveness of these types of comments, and how this kind of feedback made them feel. Checking for understanding, guided practice: The teacher will instruct the students to write a short response to any student entry posted online. Students will then choose an entry and compose their responses directly online or in their notebooks. The teacher will circulate the classroom to observe and guide students. What do you think of this lesson plan? Your (constructive) comments would be greatly appreciated!
  26. Some examples of Educational Blogs You may not be able to open these at school. http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/ http://www.teach42.com/ A large list of other educational blogs http://rpc.bloglines.com/blogroll?html=1&id=coolcatteacher&folder=Education
  27. Common Craft Video of the definition of a Wiki http://www.commoncraft.com/video-wikis-plain-english Wiki A Wiki I allows users to freely create and edit Web page content . "…a Wiki is a collaborative website comprised of the collective work of many authors. [From http://ssad.bowdoin.edu:8668/space/Definition+of+a+WikiCreated by mphillip. ]Collaboration is the key to wiki’s. The difference between a blog and a wiki: Blogs are about communicating, wikis are about getting work done, or working together. Blog users can post, modify, or delete their own content on a Website using a browser interface. Wiki users can modify any entry, even material posted by others, on a collaboratively developed Website.
  28. Wikis in Education I view Wikis as an enhancement to group projects and student collaboration. Wikis empower students and allow for more collaboration. Students can complete a class project or a detailed research project. Wikis provide a common place for the collection of information and allow all members of the group to access the same information at the same time. All members are able to edit and modify the project/assignment at any time.Teachers can also uses wikis to share information. In looking through county information and school websites I found Murray Hill Middle School's Teacher Tech Wiki. The Wiki is a professional development wiki.http://mhmsmedia.wikispaces.com/ An example of a class wiki: http://litcommentsbyus.wikispaces.com/ http://www.kidswhothink.blogspot.com/ an example of a school blog http://englishcompanion.ning.com/group/usingblogsandwikisintheenglishclassroom/forum/topics/how-do-you-use-wikis-and-bolgs
  29. Common Craft definition of del.icio.us http://www.commoncraft.com/bookmarking-plain-english Social Bookmarking http://www.commoncraft.com/
  30. Delicious tutorials Video and instructions http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/handbook/delicious.html Social Bookmarking
  31. http://www.commoncraft.com/video-social-networking social networking toolsmyspacefacebookbeboyoutubexangalivejournal Social Networking
  32. RSS Common Craft video of the definition of RSS http://www.commoncraft.com/rss_plain_english Depending on who you talk to, RSS stands for Rich Site Summary or Real Simple Syndication
  33. Definitions of RSS and Other Feeds, Subscribing, Aggregators, etc. RSS and other “feeds,” together with “feed-readers” and “aggregators,” help connect Web authors and their audience.  Perhaps to over-simplify: 1.  Authors can choose to notify others automatically of new entries or changes to part of a Website or blog by creating a "feed" for that Web element. 2.  Others may choose to be notified automatically of those new entries or changes by subscribing to such "feeds." Choosing to receive notification is called "subscribing" to the feed for that part of that Website.  Along with notification, the subscriber usually gets some form of direct access to the new or changed material.   
  34. RSS Using an aggregator and subscribing to RSS feeds allows you to customize what you receive on your computer. The aggregator is like the TV and the RSS feeds are like the channels you choose. RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. Rather than having to go out and search websites for news, movies, and new blogs, an rss feed sends the information to you. RSS content is read using a "feed reader" The person subscribes to a feed and then the reader checks the subscribed feeds for new content and downloads any updates. Many websites now contain a RSS subscription icon . Simply click, it asks through what feed reader and you are done. RSS icon RSS feeds require a "feed reader" (also known as an aggregator). Get started: You need to download the aggregator. One example is www.feedreader.com another example is Google Reader. Select your RSS feeds:
  35. Google Reader http://www.google.com/reader/ Create an account. You may use an existing email or create a Google email account. Select your RSS feeds: Select Browse for Stuff to get started finding feeds. To add a website or feed to your reader, right click and copy the url and in the reader, Select Add a subscription and paste the url in there. Or, in many web site you will see the RSS icon. Select that and add the web site when the add
  36. Idea: Have your students set up a Google Reader account and subscribe to your Delicious account. That way they can be instantly updated when you add sites.
  37. RSS in Education 1. RSS can be used with many of the online collaboration tools. You can feed your blogs, podcasts, and wikis so all readers can be notified of changes.2. Remote Education/Professional Development: It all depends on what you subscribe to: keep up on the latest techniques, trends and information, Watch/Listen to podcast lectures3. Keep up on grants/scholarships/funding opportunities.4. School News-keep parents and teachers informed about happenings and schedules
  38. http://www.commoncraft.com/twitter Twitter
  39. Tools
  40. Spelling City http://www.spellingcity.com/ Simply box http://simplybox.com/main Del.icio.us – show my accounthttp://delicious.com/ 100 top tools for learning http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/recommended/index.html
  41. Now we are going to create a blog using Teacher Lingo http://teacherlingo.com/ My blog post:http://teacherlingo.com/controlpanel/blogs/postlist.aspx?tab=postlist&sectionid=6723
  42. Top Social Bookmarking ToolsThese are the social bookmarking tools that appear in the Top 100 Tools for Learning as voted for by learning professionals worldwide. Diigo is a social annotation tool; you can highlight, clip and sticky-note any page and then share your findings with others Delicious is a free social bookmarking tool.  Store your bookmarks online, tag them and share them with your colleagues and students.  Easy to use to search for other bookmarked resources. Del.icio.us Digg is a place for people to discover and share content from anywhere on the web. From the biggest online destinations to the most obscure blog, Digg surfaces the best stuff as voted on by our users. www.digg.com Diigo is a social annotation tool; you can highlight, clip and sticky-note any page and then share your findings with others. www.diigo.com Channel surf the internet with the StumbleUpon toolbar to find great websites, videos, photos and more based on your interests. StumbleUpon learns what you like and makes better recommendations. www.stumbleupon.com
  43. Uses in Education
  44. Questions to ask when creating web 2.0 tools for student use: Who should be able to create chunks of text? Who should be able to edit chunks of text? Who should be able to add comments about chunks of text? Who should be able to edit comments? [Same as previous 4 questions, but applied to images and sounds instead of text.] Who should be able to organize, re-organize, delete items/chunks? Who should be able to control access to the assembled materials? Who should be able to determine what kinds of notifications are made available about new or changed items? Who should be able to receive the notifications?  How much choice should they have about the frequency and nature of the notifications? Why not just assign readings in books and give tests instead of using any other media, methods?  What goals and characteristics of this situation require something other than readings and test? Observation from Steve GilbertAt any instant, a blog is no more or less than a special kind of Webpage.  The differences between a blog and a Webpage are: 1.  The purposes and style of the text entries on the blog/Webpage 2.  The minimal level of Web technical expertise required to launch, modify, or add to the blog/Web page
  45. How to use Web 2.0 Tools in the Classroom-Some Examples "If every class could use some type of blog or Web page, students could post their questions and the teacher would be able to respond for the whole class to see. This means the teacher wouldn't have to answer the same question multiple times, and students would understand homework better. The class could use this blog in other ways, too. "For example, students could respond to a prompt on the blog for homework, or students could check their answers on the blog to review for a test. This site could also help a lot with students who are absent. In my math class, the teacher created a Web site where students can access all the worksheets. This is a big help to students, because they can complete makeup work more easily, and kids are always losing their worksheets." This web site has some great examples http://www.ideastoinspire.co.uk/#2
  46. How to Teach with Technology: Language Arts Students fire off ideas for using digital tools to learn language and literature. by Sara Bernard Video Dialogues "I think students would retain a lot more information if they made a video about the person they're studying or created an instant message dialogue in which they imagine a fictional conversation between characters, as opposed to just taking a test or writing an essay. "If every class could use some type of blog or Web page, students could post their questions and the teacher would be able to respond for the whole class to see. This means the teacher wouldn't have to answer the same question multiple times, and students would understand homework better. The class could use this blog in other ways, too. "For example, students could respond to a prompt on the blog for homework, or students could check their answers on the blog to review for a test. This site could also help a lot with students who are absent. In my math class, the teacher created a Web site where students can access all the worksheets. This is a big help to students, because they can complete makeup work more easily, and kids are always losing their worksheets." Read more about creating a blog for your classroom.
  47. Every Picture Tells a Story "With Photo Story, you tell a story with pictures. You get pictures for your story, you add voice, and, as an option, you can put in effects or music. It helps me with voice and dialogue in my writing, which you need to keep your listener interested." Photo Story is a free application within the Windows XP operating system that allows users to create a digital presentation of sounds and images. Fifth-grade students at Denton Avenue School, in New Hyde Park, New York, use the program as part of the language arts curriculum. In a recent project, students wrote narratives about the teachers at their school. The added layers of images, timing, visual effects, and music help students think critically about narrative and audience. (The students shared the stories with their teachers and on the class Web site.) Global Brainstorming "Last year, my teacher used Skype in a different way. We read the book The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, by Chris Van Allsburg. We had to come up with a story about each picture in the book, and we worked on the stories with a class in Florida! We were able to work on stories with kids in an entirely different state without even getting on a plane." Skype is a simple way to conduct phone and video calls free of charge through the Internet. For a free download, visit Skype.com.
  48. Give-and-Take Storytelling "When I'm writing a story by myself in a Word document, I'm usually at a loss for what to say. I'm always going back and changing things or messing around with fonts. But when my friend and I use the online chat tool Google Talk, we make a story. Line by line, going back and forth, we add on to our crazy plots. "See, when you chat, you're not alone. Someone is always there to add on. Also, you cannot go back and change things. It keeps the story moving forward, and it's great for rough drafts. I think people could definitely use this in the classroom for creative writing. "Once you've made your chat, it can be automatically saved and you can easily print it out. When you want to edit the story, all you have to do is copy and paste it into a Word document. It's a way to work together, get out your ideas, and use technology."
  49. Thinking Aloud "I would use VoiceThread to record responses to poems. Kids think about poems differently than adults. VoiceThread helps kids express their thoughts easily and record their feelings, emotions, and understanding." VoiceThread is collaborative slide show software that allows users to contribute audio, images, and video. Students in Lisa Parisi and Christine Southard's fifth-grade class at Denton Avenue School use VoiceThread to recite poetry and voice their responses to literature as well as to connect with students around the world. For example, an ongoing project on their class Web site uses VoiceThread to share common phrases in dozens of languages.
  50. The Mural of the Story "In art class, we made murals in groups. We wrote down a script about different aspects of our mural and then recorded audio tours using GarageBand. Then, we loaded the recordings onto iPods. We're going to display the murals with the iPods so people can listen to our audio tour." GarageBand is free software in the Macintosh operating system that encourages users to learn the basics of piano and guitar. It also allows you to record, mix, and edit multiple audio tracks. Visit GarageBand online for explanations and tutorials. Sara Bernard is a former staff writer and multimedia producer at Edutopia.
  51. Discussion
  52. Why are the web 2.0 applications free? The previous method of obtaining money for products was advertising. One ad is viewed by many people, but only applies to a few. With web 2.0, advertising can be targeted to the specific audience so there is a much closer ratio of ad to person. IE, more bang for the buck You receive 80% of the application for free and can then purchase the last 20% if you really like it. This happens frequently enough that it is worthwhile for the people who create the applications.
  53. Brainstorm about how online collaboration could be used at school. What problems/issues do you see with using web 2.0 applications? Discuss back channelling.
  54. REsources
  55. Resources PBS program – Growing up Online http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/kidsonline/ Excellent group of resources on using Blogs in Education http://akbani.blogspot.com/2006/05/blog-as-teaching-tool.html Here is a blog I created to be used for Educational Technology and Web 2.0 http://lfishpennwood.blogspot.com/ 2009 Web 2.0 tools list http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/recommended/index.html All kinds of resources http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/learningresources.html Twitter Workshop http://www.slideshare.net/janehart/twitter-workshop-1604109?type=presentation
  56. Internet Web 2.0 Resources http://Itsc.oetc.org/cool.php http://kathyschrock.net/web20/ http://www.go2web20.net/ http://www.philb.com/iwantto.htm http://www.diigo.com/list/Kathyschrock/web20tools  (blocked at school - need to do at home)  http://movies.atomiclearning.com/k12/web20/ http://kathyschrock.net/cooking/ http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/ (blocked at school - need to do at home) http://www.web20searchengine.com/web20/web-2.0-list.htm Or do a search on education and web 2.0
  57. More Resources General Introductory Info about Blogs & Blogging & WikisVery introductory info about blogging in general and tools, software for beginners<<http://weblogs.about.com/od/weblogsbasics/>> Lots of useful links for info about WikisGerry McKiernan, SandBox(sm). WikiBibliography (covering 2003-2005), 2005b, available at http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/WikiBib.htm
  58. Very Cool Websites http://www.archive.org/details/anna_fountainhead http://www.learner.org/interactives/rockcycle/ http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/visualization/collections.html http://www.funderstanding.com/k12/coaster/ http://brunelleschi.imss.fi.it/menteleonardo/ http://www.dnalc.org/ddnalc/resources/animations.html http://www.apples4theteacher.com/index.html
  59. To Learn More An excellent resource for learning about all aspects of technology is Atomic Learning. This is a subscription service, but you may obtain an account from the IU.