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Early Childhood Outcomes Early Childhood Setting Codes PowerPoint Presentation
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Early Childhood Outcomes Early Childhood Setting Codes

Early Childhood Outcomes Early Childhood Setting Codes

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Early Childhood Outcomes Early Childhood Setting Codes

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  1. Early Childhood OutcomesEarly Childhood Setting Codes

  2. Today’s Agenda • Early Childhood Outcomes • Changes necessary to meet new requirements • Timelines for gathering 2006 – 2007 ECO data • Early Childhood Setting Codes

  3. Iowa’s Early Childhood OutcomesPurpose: • Develop and Implement a Statewide Accountability System to Measure Outcomes for Infants and Toddlers in Early ACCESS and Preschoolers in Early Childhood Special Education

  4. Why Collect Early Childhood Outcome Data? • Requirement to report in IDEA 2004 • Provide information to the public • Document effectiveness of Early Childhood Special Education services

  5. The Essential Question • Are students with disabilities entering school ready to learn at high levels?

  6. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes:Target Population • Early ACCESS • Infants and Toddlers • All infants and toddlers that have an IFSP • Include children when transitioning at the age of 3 • Early Childhood Special Education • Preschoolers • All preschool children that have an IEP • Include children when transitioning from ECSE services to kindergarten • Include children receiving ECSE services and Kindergarten services (Part-Time/Part Time) • Do NOT include children that begin receiving special education services in kindergarten

  7. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes:Three ECO Areas Children with IFSP/IEP who demonstrate improved: • Positive social-emotional skills (including social relationships) • Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/communication, problem solving, and early literacy for preschoolers) • Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs ( taking care of basic needs, getting around in the environment, integrating motor skills to complete tasks, self-help, engaging in play)

  8. Original Percentage of children who: Reach or maintain functioning at a level comparable to same-aged peers Improved functioning Did not improve functioning Change Percentage of children who: Did not improve functioning Improved functioning but not sufficient to move nearer to functioning comparable to same-aged peers Improved functioning to a level nearer to same-aged peers but did not reach it Improved functioning to reach a level comparable to same-aged peers Maintained functioning at a level comparable to same-aged peers *In each of the 3 ECO Areas Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes:Reporting Categories

  9. Summarizing Children’s Accomplishments • ECO Summary Form is used by IEP teams to summarize information related to the 3 ECO areas. • Information is summarized from multiple methods and sources • All IFSP and IEP Teams will reach consensus on the results reported on the ECO.

  10. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary FormOctober 2006 • Comparison to peers or standards: • To what extent does this child show age-appropriate functioning in the area of positive social-emotional skills across a variety of settings and situations

  11. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form Comparison to peers or standards • 7-Point Rating Scale • Rating is based on: • Current level of functioning demonstrated across a range of situations and settings that make up the child’s day • Typical functioning, not his/her capacity to function under ideal circumstances • Functioning using assistive technology or special accommodations • Skills and behaviors compared to age appropriate expectations based on child development research

  12. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form Comparison to peers or standards • Rating is NOT based on: • A single behavior or skill • Discrete behaviors • Demonstration of skills under ideal circumstances that not does not reflect everyday situations or settings

  13. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form • Progress: • Has the child shown any new skills or behaviors related to positive social-emotional skills since the last IEP meeting?

  14. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form • Child’s Progress is based on any of the following: • Acquisition of a new skill or behavior since the last IFSP or IEP meeting • More independently demonstrates mastery of a skill or behavior • Progress made toward achieving IFSP Outcomes or IEP Goals • Improve skills and behaviors to a level nearer to age-appropriate functioning

  15. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form • Supporting Evidence for Outcome Rating and Progress in Positive Social-Emotional Skills • Information gathered from various procedures and multiple sources of data • Progress monitoring data • IFSP and IEP Results data • Age appropriate expectations • Other relevant information regarding child’s functioning across a variety of settings and everyday situations

  16. The ECO Summary Form • An ECO Summary form for each of 3 ECO areas must be reported for every infant/toddler with an IFSP or preschooler with an IEP. • Data are needed in all ECO areas even if: • No one has concerns about a child’s development • A child has delays in one or two ECO areas, but not in all three ECO areas

  17. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: ECO Summary Form • Completing the ECO Summary form • Complete for each ECO area, despite services receiving or areas of concern • Initial IFSP or IEP meeting for infants, toddlers or preschool children • Annually as a part of the IFSP or IEP meeting, • Complete ECO Summary form until the child no longer receives Early ACCESS or ECSE services • MUST complete when child leaves services (i.e. exits services, transitions at age 3 or into kindergarten)

  18. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: Timelines Beginning February 1, 2006 • Initial IFSP or IEP Meetings • Comparison to Peers or Standard Beginning July 1, 2006 • Initial, Annual IFSP and IEP Meetings; Exit Meetings, and Re-evaluation IEP Meetings • Comparison to Peers or Standard • Progress • Supporting Evidence * SPP – Baseline and Targets will be based on these data!

  19. Iowa’s Early Childhood Outcomes: Timelines • IFSP and IEP Meetings held between July 1 to November 10, 2006 – • Teams have until Friday, December 1 to complete the new ECO Summary form • Beginning November 10, 2006 – • Teams complete the new ECO Summary form at the time of the IFSP and IEP Meetings

  20. What questions or comments do you have about ECO?

  21. REPORTING EDUCATION ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIESAGES 3-5

  22. Part B, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Implementation of FAPE Requirements Child Count Data for 2006 Authorization: P.L. 108-446, Section 618 (a)(1)(A)(ii), Section 618 (a)(1)(A)(iii), and Section 618(a)(3);34CFR§§300.460,340.640, 300.642(b),300.645

  23. WHEN? • All staffings beginning November 6, 2006 • Determine new setting codes for all staffings that have occurred since July 1, 2006

  24. WHO? • All 3 – 5 year olds receiving ECSE services, including support services only

  25. DECISION FACTORS? • What are the decision rules in determining which environment to use when reporting each child?

  26. Integrated Settings • Is the child attending an early childhood program that is designed for children without disabilities and includes at least 50% non-disabled children? • Head Start, Kindergarten, Reverse Integration Classrooms, Private preschool, LEA preschool, Childcare center • Is his/her IEP implemented in that setting?

  27. Reverse Integration Programs • Feds now recognize • Iowa is not encouraging • May be appropriate in rural districts but only for a VERY LIMITED TIME • Research tells us that there is less social interaction in reverse integration programs which could effect children’s social/emotional skills as reflected in ECO (Guralnick & Groom, 1998)

  28. Calculating Time in EC Programs • % of time the child spends in a regular EC program • Numerator: number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program • Denominator: total number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program plus minutes per month spent receiving ECSE instructional and related services outside the EC program

  29. Calculating Time • Number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program • _________________________________ • Number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program + number of minutes per month child receives ECSE instructional & related services outside the EC program

  30. TIME FACTORS • 60 Minutes per Hour • 5 Days per Week • 20 Days per Month • 4 Weeks per Month

  31. A 1 Example • Child is in a regular early childhood program at least 80% of the time • Example: Child attends Little Lambs preschool 6 hours/week (360 minutes/wk or 1440 min/month) where his/her IEP is being implemented. Child also receives speech/language services at the local elementary school for 1 hour/week (60 min/week or 240 min/month)

  32. A1 Calculation • # of minutes/month in regular education: 1440 • # of minutes/month receiving ECSE services: 1680 • Calculate percentage: 1440 ÷ 1680 = 86%

  33. A 2 Example • Child is in the regular early childhood program 40% to 70% of the time • Example: Child attends ABC Preschool 7 hours/week (420 min/week and 1680 min/month) and receives special education instructional services and speech/language services in that setting. S/he also attends an LEA ECSE classroom 4 hours/week 240 min/week, 960 min/month).

  34. A2 Calculation • # of minutes per month in regular education: 1680 • # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: 2640 • 1680 ÷ 2640 =64%

  35. A2 Example #2 • Child attends Apple Tree Preschool 5 hours per week (300 min/week, 1200 min/month) where the IEP is being implemented. • S/he receives speech/language services 1 hr/week (60 min/week, 240 min/month) at the local elementary school • S/he receives physical therapy services 1 hr/week (60 min/week, 240 min/month) at the AEA office • S/he receives occupational therapy services 1 hr/month (60 min/month) at the AEA office

  36. A2 #2 Calculation • Amount of time in regular education: 1200 minutes/month • Amount of time receiving ECSE services: 1740 minutes/month • 1200 ÷ 1740 = 69%

  37. A 3 Example • Child is in the regular early childhood program less than 40% of the time • Child attends Charlie Brown Child Care Center 7 hours per week (420 min/week, 1680 min/month) where the IEP is being implemented. S/he also attends the LEA ECSE program 30 hours/week (1800 min/week, 7200 min/month). Physical therapy is offered in the home 1 hour per month (60 min/month).

  38. A3 Calculation • # of minutes per month in regular education: 1680 • # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: 8940 • 1680 ÷ 8940 = 19%

  39. A3 #2 Example • The child attends a Shared Visions program 5 hours per week (300 min/week, 1200 min/month). S/he also attends the district’s ECSE classroom 25 hours per week (1500 min/week, 6000 min/month). The IEP is being implemented in both settings.

  40. A3 #2 Calculation • # of minutes per month in regular ed: 1200 • # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: 7200 • 1200 ÷7200 = 2%

  41. Non-integrated Settings • Does the child attend an early childhood special education program? • Is that the only setting where the child’s IEP is being implemented?

  42. Early Childhood Special Education Programs • A program that includes 51% or more children with disabilities • A program that is designed for children with disabilities • Examples: ECSE classroom in regular school buildings; ECSE classroom in a childcare facility, hospital, or other community based setting; separate school; and residential facilities

  43. B 1 • Separate class - Child attends a special education program in a class with less than 50% non-disabled children • Example: Child attends the school district’s ECSE classroom 30 hours/week and receives speech/language and OT services in that setting

  44. B 2 • Separate school - Child receives education programs in public or private day schools designed specifically for children with disabilities

  45. B 3 • Residential facility - Child receives education programs in publicly or privately operated residential schools or residential medical facilities on an inpatient basis

  46. B 4 • Home – child receives special education and related services in the principal residence of the child’s family or caregivers • Non-example: Child Development home where the child attends childcare

  47. B 5 • Service provider location – child receives all special education & related services from a service provider in the service provider’s location. • Examples: local school building where the speech/language pathologist is officed, private clinicians’ offices, hospital facilities on an outpatient basis, and other public locations

  48. What questions or comments do you have about Early Childhood Setting Codes