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Bell to Bell

Bell to Bell

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Bell to Bell

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  1. Bell to Bell Daily Instructional Activities

  2. Components of Instruction…(Reading) • Bell Ringer/Fluency practice • Whole Group Explicit Instruction • Small Group Differentiated Instruction • Instructional Centers • Technology • Active Learning • Independent Reading • Wrap-up

  3. Structure for Successful Instruction Teacher Responsibility Whole Group - Model “I do it” Guided Instruction “We do it” “You do it together” Collaboration “You do it alone” Independent Student Responsibility

  4. Structure for Successful Instruction – Missing Collaboration Teacher Responsibility Whole Group - Model “I do it” Guided Instruction “We do it” “You do it alone” Independent Student Responsibility

  5. When Learning Isn’t Occurring Teacher Responsibility Whole Group - Model “I do it” “You do it alone” Independent Student Responsibility

  6. When Learning Isn’t Occurring Teacher Responsibility “You do it alone” Independent Student Responsibility

  7. Read 180 (Rotational Instructional Model) Whole Group Activities – power point presentation of story elements to introduce concepts, character mapping activities, CRISS activities, group discussions, pre- reading activities, etc. Small Group Activities – a continuation from whole group, plus differentiated instruction with some form of story mapping/graphic organizer being used. Technology – Read 180 program Independent Reading/Writing – Reading with writing (independent reading/writing prompts.)

  8. Read 180 Alignment to the Curriculum Framework

  9. EDGE (Rotational Instructional Model) • Whole Group Activities – (Reading/ELA Focus Benchmark), Explicit Instruction- “I Do, We Do, You Do” model- power point presentation to introduce concepts, character mapping activities, CRISS activities, group discussions, pre- reading activities, etc. • Small Group Activities – (Reading Strategies Instruction) a continuation from whole group, plus differentiated instruction with some form of story mapping/graphic organizer being used. • Group Formulation- should be data specific. (EDW Reports) • Remediation, Corrective Instruction, and Enrichment • Focus should be differentiated to students needs.

  10. EDGE (Rotational Instructional Model) • Instructional Centers – • Technology: Read On! Program • Independent Reading: Student selected text, with use of classroom libraries, reading logs • Active Learning(small group): Teacher created activities, use for enrichment purposes. (Boost up the Rigor!) Pre-AP Strategies, Edge enrichment activities. • Wrap-up – Discussion and Exit Slips

  11. Components of Instruction…English (ELA) • Bell Ringer/ 6 Way Paragraphs/Writing Bell ringer • Whole group Explicit Instruction • Reading/Vocabulary strategy Instruction • Writing Instruction • Small group Differentiated Instruction (Reading/Writing) • Journal Response • Teacher created materials, Palm Beach Co. Mini Lesson support • Strategy grouping • Independent Reading • Writing teacher conferences • Wrap-up

  12. Components of Instruction…English (ELA) • Whole Group Activities – (ELA Focus Benchmark), Explicit Instruction- “I Do, We Do, You Do” model- power point presentation to introduce concepts, Learning Village activities, CRISS activities, group discussions, pre- reading activities, Prentice Hall Textbooks, Pre AP Strategies, etc. • Small Group Activities – (Reading/Writing Strategies Instruction) a continuation from whole group, plus differentiated instruction, writing strategies instruction writing prompt practice. • Group Formulation- should be data specific. (EDW Reports) • Remediation, Corrective Instruction, and Enrichment • Focus should be differentiated to students needs.

  13. National Reading Panel (2000) Researched & Approved Reading Comprehension Strategies

  14. Text Comprehension Instruction • The National Reading Panel’s synthesis (NICHD, 2000) of comprehension research studies indicates explicit or formal instruction in the application of a multiple-strategy method has been shown to be highly effective in enhancing understanding. The seven techniques below appear to provide a scientifically based foundation for the improvement of comprehension. • Comprehension Monitoring: where readers learn how to be aware of their understanding of the material; • Cooperative Learning: where students learn reading strategies together; • Use of graphic and semantic organizers: where readers make graphic representations of the material to assist comprehension; • Question answering: where readers answer questions posed by the teacher and receive immediate feedback; • Question generation: where readers ask themselves questions about various aspects of the story; • Story structure: where students are taught to use the structure of the story as a means for helping them recall the story content in order to answer questions about what they have read;

  15. Text Comprehension Instruction • Summarization: where readers are taught to integrate ideas , infer, and generalize from text information. • The evidence suggest that teaching a combination of reading comprehension techniques is most effective. When students use them appropriately, they assist in recall, question answering, question generation, and summarization of text.

  16. Higher-Order Questioning Strategies(QAR) Question Answer Relationships

  17. Higher-Order Questioning Strategies(QTA) Questioning The Author QTA- Questioning the Author • Questioning the Author helps students build a deeper understanding of texts by learning to query the author. Its main purpose for the implementation of this comprehension strategy is to allow students to explore the message the author is conveying in texts. Model using questions to discern what the author means. • What is the author trying to say here? • What is happening in this part? • What is the author talking about?

  18. Data Analysis “Targeting the Movers and Shakers”

  19. Data Notebooks • Data collection – (Data Notebooks) • The following reports and resources are suggested. These reports should be utilized to drive instruction and determine the flexible grouping of students based on students needs and progress. • Global Reports- these reports offer a “picture” of the student’s performance as measured by various formal assessments. These are to be used for the beginning of the year grouping and appropriate intervals to determine student’s instructional needs. • Local Reports- these reports allow teachers the opportunity to continually monitor the students’ learning of concepts and skills as they are being taught. • Other resources- these resources give teachers an opportunity to record their reflections and observations and ACTION PLANS. (Refer to Data Notebook handout for examples of these reports)

  20. Data Analysis Charts

  21. LESSON IDEAS for Classroom Instruction

  22. Example Lesson #1 • Category 2 – Reading Application • Concept focus- Main Idea & Compare and Contrast • Benchmarks – LA.910.1.7.3 & LA.910.1.7.7 • Reading passages – poem • Strategies/graphic organizer- (TP-CASTT)

  23. TP-CASTT Strategy (TP-CASTT): used for analyzing a poetic text by identifying and discussing Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude, Shift, Theme, and Title again. Purpose: to use an analytical process to understand the author’s craft.

  24. Example Lesson #2 • Category 3 – Literary Analysis • Primary Content Focus – Figurative Language & Literary Elements • Secondary Content focus - Compare & Contrast • Benchmarks – primary: LA.910.2.1.7 • secondary: LA.910.1.7.7 • Reading passages – Same Subject, Different Voice • Graphic Organizer – (DSIT)

  25. DSITI Graphic Organizer (DSITI): stands for Diction (what word choices does the speaker make? Formal or Informal?), Syntax (are the sentences short, long, simple, complex?), Imagery (what words and phrases are used to describe sensory details?), Tone (what can you conclude about the speaker’s attitude toward the subject?), Inferences about the speaker ( what might you infer about the speaker’s age, status, preferences?)

  26. QUESTIONS AND CONCERNS • Q&A Period

  27. Graphic Organizers and Pre-AP Reading Strategies

  28. RAFT Strategy (RAFT): used for responding to and analyzing text by brainstorming various Roles (self or characters from other texts), Audiences (a different character or a real person), Formats (letter, brochure, essay, or travel guide), and Topics; readers may choose one particular role, audience, format, and topic to create a new text. Purpose: to initiate reader response; to facilitate an analysis of a text to gain focus prior to creating a next text.

  29. SIFT Strategy (SIFT): Used for analyzing a fictional text by examining Stylistic elements, especially symbol Images, and Figures of speech in order to show how all work together to reveal Tone and Theme. Purpose:to focus and facilitate an analysis of a fictional text by examining the title and text symbolism, identifying images, and sensory details, analyzing figurative language and identifying how all these elements reveal tone and theme.

  30. SOAPSTone Strategy (SOAPSTone): used for analyzing text by discussing and identifying the Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, and Tone. Purpose: to use an analytical process to understand the author’s craft.

  31. TWIST Strategy (TWIST): Used to arrive at a thesis statement that incorporates the follow literary elements: Tone, Word Choice (diction), Imagery, Style, and Theme. Purpose: to create an interpretive thesis in response to a prompt about a passage.

  32. Resources for Graphic Organizers • Websites for Graphic Organizers • http://www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/ - • http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=2983 – • http://www.teachervision.fen.com/graphic-organizers/printable/6293.html

  33. Contact Information • Taryn Ortiz Secondary Curriculum Reading 6-12 Resource Teacher PX: 43806 ; Direct line: (561) 963-3806 ortizt@palmbeach.k12.fl.us • Crystal Young Secondary Curriculum Language Arts/English 6-12 Resource Teacher PX: 43869; Direct line: (561) 963-3869 Crystal.young@palmbeach.k12.fl.us • Sandee Fleming Secondary Curriculum Content Literacy Specialist 6-12 PX: 76315 (Gold Coast), 48454 (FHESC) flemings@palmbeach.k12.fl.us