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  1. BR-main Before Reading 1. Word-web 2. Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding Chinese Wedding Wedding Anniversary Marriage Tips 3. Background Information Virginia Woolf What Are They Famous for

  2. BR1- Word-web1.2 Word-web bride wedding ceremony 新娘 结婚仪式 bridegroom marriage license 新郎 结婚证 bridesmaid wedding anniversary 女傧相 结婚纪念日 best man matchmaker 男傧相 媒人 bridal sedan chair elopement 花轿 私奔 bridal veil extramarital affairs 婚纱 婚外恋 wedding ring bachelor 结婚戒指 单身汉 wedding banquet divorce 喜酒 离婚

  3. BR1- Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding1.1 Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding The white wedding — a formal affair with the bride dressed in white — is now the standard throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe, and its practice has spread to Asia and Africa as well. In a wedding ceremony, a priest or a government-certified official administers the ceremony in the presence of at least two witnesses. Most couples exchange some sort of marriage vows. Vows may be prescribed by the church or written by the couple. Traditional Protestant vows include the promise to love and to cherish, for better and for worse, for richer and for poorer, in sickness and in health, until parted by death. The minister asks the bride and the groom if they each make this promise to the other and each responds "I do."

  4. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding1.2 Following the wedding ceremony, many couples hold a reception. At the reception friends and family gather to eat, drink, listen to music and dance, make toasts, and give gifts to the bride and groom. During the reception, the couple typically cut a special, large cake that is shared with all the guests. The bride and groom may also conduct a receiving line where they greet and thank each guest for attending their wedding. Many newlyweds take a honeymoon trip after their wedding. During the honeymoon, the couple can spend time by themselves exploring their new status as husband and wife. ■ ■

  5. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding2.1 Chinese Wedding 1. Traditional Chinese Wedding At dawn on the wedding day, the bride puts on new clothes, wears a pair of red shoes and waits for the so-called "good luck woman" to dress her hair in the style of a married woman. Her head would be covered with a red silk veil. On the other hand, the bridegroom prepares himself to receive his wife. He gets capped and dressed in a long gown, red shoes and a red silk ball on his chest. Then the bridegroom sets out to receive his bride. The most interesting part of the reception really takes place at the doorstep of the bride's residence, which is heavily guarded by the bridesmaid or the bride's sisters. It is customary for the bridesmaid to give the bridegroom a difficult time before he is allowed to enter. Usually, he has to distribute among them red packets containing money — in order to take his bride home. ■

  6. Before the bride departs to the bridegroom's home, the "good luck woman" will lead her to the sedan chair. The bride has to cry to show that she does not want to leave her parents. Then firecrackers will be set off to drive away evil spirits as the bride sits in the sedan chair. When the parading troop arrives at the bridegroom's, firecrackers will be set off to hail the bride's arrival. By the threshold, a flaming stove and saddle will be set up and the bride is required to sidestep or step over them to avoid evils. The wedding ceremony is the focus of interest. The bride and bridegroom are led to the family altar, where the couple kowtow to Heaven and Earth, the family ancestors and parents successively. They then bow to each other and are led to the bridal chamber. Afterwards, a grand feast is held for relatives and those who helped with the wedding. The newly wed couple will resume drinking wedding wine. Generally they are required to cross their arms to sip wine. They also will toast their guests. Guests voice their good wishes for the couple even though the bridegroom is trying to be humble while acting embarrassed.

  7. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding2.2 2. Modern Chinese Wedding Directions: Watch the following pictures carefully and give a description of a modern Chinese wedding in your own words.

  8. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding3.1 Wedding Anniversary Directions: The following are the names of wedding anniversary in Chinese. You are required to match the English names to them. 皮革婚 leather wedding (3rd) 纸婚 paper wedding (1st) 棉婚 cotton wedding (2nd) 丝婚 silk wedding (4th)

  9. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding3.2 铁婚 iron wedding (6th) 木婚 wood wedding (5th) 铜/羊毛婚 copper / wool wedding (7th) electric appliance wedding (8th) 电器婚 pottery wedding (9th) 陶器婚 锡婚 tin wedding (10th)

  10. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding3.3 pearl wedding (30th) 珍珠婚 瓷婚 china wedding (20th) 红宝石婚 ruby wedding (40th) diamond wedding (60th) golden wedding (50th) 金婚 钻石婚

  11. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding4.1 Marriage Tips Directions: Here is a list of Ten Rules for a Happy Marriage from a couple who reached their 50th anniversary and successfully made their marriage a promise for life. Listen carefully and fill in the blanks with what you hear. Never both be at the same time. Never yell at each other unless the house is on . If one of you has to win an , let it be your mate. If you must criticize, do it . Never bring up mistakes of the . 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. ____ angry __ fire _______ argument ______ lovingly ___ past ■

  12. BR1-Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding4.2 the whole world rather than each other. Never go to sleep with an argument . At least once every day say a kind or word to your life partner. When you have done something wrong, admit it and ask for . Remember it takes two to make a . 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. ______ Neglect _______ unsettled __________ complimentary ________ forgiveness _____ quarrel

  13. BR1-Background Information 1.1 Background Information Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf (1882-1941):a major British novelist, essayist, and critic — was one of the leaders in the literary movement of modernism.

  14. BR2- Background Information 1.2 • Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London. Woolf was educated at home by her father. "Think how I was brought up! No school; mooning about alone among my father's books; never any chance to pick up all that goes on in schools — throwing balls; ragging; slang; vulgarities; scenes; jealousies!"

  15. BR2- Background Information 1.3 2. In her works, she used a technique called "stream of consciousness", revealing the lives of her characters by revealing their thoughts and associations. She abandoned linear narrative and used such devices as stream of consciousness and interior monologue.

  16. BR2- Background Information 1.4 3. She was also a feminist, socialist, and pacifist. She argued that a change in the forms of literature was necessary because most literature had been "made by men out of their own needs for their own uses”. In her works, Woolf developed innovative literary techniques in order to reveal women's experience and find an alternative to the male-dominated views of reality.

  17. BR2- Background Information 1.5 As an essayist Woolf was prolific. She published some 500 essays in periodicals and collections, beginning 1905. Characteristic of Woolf's essays is the dialogue-based nature of her style — her reader is often directly addressed, in a conversational tone. 4.

  18. BR2- Background Information 1.6 5. Her mother died when she was in her early teens. Stella Duckworth, her half sister, took her mother's place, but died two years later. Leslie Stephen, her father, suffered a slow death from cancer. When her brother Toby died in 1906, she had a prolonged mental breakdown. After her final attack of mental illness Woolf loaded her pockets with stones and drowned herself in a river on March 28, 1941. "I have a feeling I shall go mad. I cannot go on longer in these terrible times. I hear voices and cannot concentrate on my work. I have fought against it but cannot fight any longer. I owe all my happiness to you but cannot go on and spoil your life."

  19. BR2- Background Information2.1 What Are They Famous for? Do you know these famous places and their stories? Piccadilly Parliament Tower of London House of Commons House of Lords Whitechapel Mansion House The East End

  20. BR2- Background Information2.2 1. Tower of London: one of the oldest and most famous buildings in London, England. It is an ancient fortress on the north bank of the river Thames to the east of the city, and is a popular tourist attraction. It was made a World Heritage Site in 1988. Tower of London

  21. BR2- Background Information2.3 2. Piccadilly: a famous street in London's West End, between Piccadilly Circus and Hyde Park Corner. Some of London's most expensive hotels, shops and clubs are on Piccadilly. Piccadilly Circus: a famous London Landmark at the junction of five busy streets. At its heart is a bronze fountain topped by a figure of a winged archer(射手). Piccadilly

  22. BR2-Background Information2.4 3. Parliament: It has three parts: the Royal Apartments, the House of Lords and the House of Commons. The House of Commons and House of Lords meet in the Palace of Westminster, located next to the River Thames in London. It has been a royal palace for nearly 1,000 years but most of the current building dates from the middle of the Nineteenth Century when the Palace was rebuilt after a fire destroyed most of the earlier medieval buildings in 1834. Parliament

  23. BR2-Background Information2.5 4. House of Commons: the lower house of the British Parliament, in which elected Members of Parliament meet to discuss current political issues and vote on Acts of Parliament. House of Commons

  24. BR2-Background Information2.6 5. House of Lords: The House of Lords considers legislation(立法), debates issues of importance and provides a forum for government ministers to be questioned. The Committees of the House consider a wide range of issues and produce reports on them. The House of Lords also includes the Law Lords which is the highest court in the United Kingdom. House of Lords

  25. BR2-Background Information2.7 6. Mansion House: As the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London, Mansion House has a suitably fitting neo-classical design. As well as providing the Lord Mayor with living quarters and office space, Mansion House serves as the venue for luxurious ceremonial banquets. The magnificent Egyptian Hall is most famously used for the Chancellor of the Exchequer's(财政大臣)annual speech to the 'great and good' of the City's financial organizations. Mansion House

  26. BR2-Background Information2.8 7. The East End: an area to the east of the City of London, from the Tower of London along the north bank of the River Thames. It contains most of the old docks, where many of the local people used to work. The people living in the East End were mostly poor but well known for their friendly and lively nature. With recent new housing developments, the character of the area has completely changed. The East End

  27. BR2-Background Information2.9 8. Whitechapel: a district in the East End of London. It has a reputation as one of the poorest areas of central London, and one where many immigrants have settled. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries many Jewish people came to live in Whitechapel, and it still has many Jewish shops and businesses. Whitechapel

  28. GR-MAIN Global Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Questions about the Text 3. Scanning 4. Further Understanding For Part 1 Table Completion For Part 2 Role Play For Part 3 Sequencing For Part 4 Presentation

  29. GR-Part Division of the Text Part Division of the Text Parts Lines Main Ideas Gilbert meets Sissy Miller and gives her the gift his wife Angela left for her. 1 1~79 In Angela's diary Gilbert reads about how she felt, proud of him at first as a promising politician, and then a bit lonely at home. 2 80~107 Angela' diary reveals how she went to work with the poor in the East End and developed an affection for B.M. 3 108~182 Gilbert finally comes to realize that Angela committed suicide in order to escape from him and rejoin her lover. 4 183~198

  30. GR- Questions about the Text 1.1 Questions about the Text 1. What happened to Angela six weeks ago? When she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly, she was hit and killed by a car. 2. What was Gilbert's impression of Sissy Miller? What did Angela think of her? Gilbert thought Sissy Miller was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything.

  31. GR- Questions about the Text 1.2 3. What fantastic idea occurred to Gilbert as Sissy Miller left his house? He thought that Sissy Miller might have had entertained a passion for him although he had scarcely noticed her during all those years. 4. How did Angela and Gilbert get along when she was alive? For the first years of their marriage, they led a happy life. The couple were both proud for each other. They often went out together. Gradually, as the husband became more absorbed in work, the wife was often left alone at home. 5. What career did Gilbert pursue? What was his ambition? Gilbert was a politician. His dream was to become a great success in his career, i.e. the Prime Minister.

  32. GR- Questions about the Text 1.3 6. What work did Angela want to do? How did she take her work in the East End? She wanted to have some work of her own. She wanted to do something to help others, especially the poor people. She took her work in the East End very seriously. 7. What kind of a man was B.M.? B.M. was a socialist who believed in Karl Marx. He hated the existing social system. He called for revolution. He argued that people should be equal to each other. He was longing for freedom and romance. 8. Did Angela die by accident? Angela did not die by accident. She committed suicide.

  33. GR-Scanning1.1 Scanning Directions: In the text, the situation of “she stepped off the kerb …” occurs four times. Scan Text A and find them out. Discuss the differences each time it is mentioned. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.(LL. 7~9) ) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him no chance to pull up. (LL. 23~25) 2. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  34. GR-Scanning1.2 He could see her in front of him. She was standing on the kerb in Piccadilly. Her eyes stared; her fists were clenched. Here came the car… (LL.183~185) _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. She had stepped off the kerb to rejoin her lover. She had stepped off the kerb to escape from him.(LL. 197~198) _________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4.

  35. GR-Further Understanding1.1 Further Understanding For Part 1 Table Completion Directions: After we finish reading the story, we realize that Mrs. Clandon was not killed by accident. In fact, she committed suicide. In the first part, there are enough clues where every word is meant to count and contribute to the development of the plot. Scan this part and find more examples. Clue 1: It was strange that Angela had made enough preparations for her death. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order…It was as if she had foreseen her death. (LL. 5~7) Examples: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  36. GR-Further Understanding1.2 Clue 2: The relationship between Angela and Sissy Miller was peculiarly close. Examples: Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. …She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on. (LL. 23~25) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Clue 3: Sissy Miller was in mourning for a brother who died just before Angela. Examples: She too had had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a week or two before Angela. … Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. (LL.58~61)

  37. GR-Further Understanding1.3 Clue 4: The parting comments of Sissy Miller were quite suggestive. Examples: "Mr Clandon," she said, looking straight at him for the first time, and for the first time he was struck by the expression, sympathetic yet searching, in her eyes. "If at any time," she was saying, "there's anything I can do to help you, remember, I shall feel it, for your wife's sake, a pleasure?" (LL. 68~71) ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Clue 5: Sissy Miller shared the same initial with B.M.

  38. GR-Further Understanding2.1 For Part 2 Role play Directions: Make a dialogue between Angela and Sissy Miller. Make sure to cover the following points: Angela 1) Describing the changed relationship between her and Gilbert. 2) Expressing her concern about the indifference in their marriage. 3) Seeking Sissy Miller’s advice. Sissy Miller 1) Condoling with Angela on this problem. 2) Gives some advice for how to maintain a happy marriage. 3) Suggests that Angela had better find a job.

  39. GR-Further Understanding3.1 For Part 3 Sequencing In Part Three, Angela’s diary revealed how she went to work with the poor in the East End and developed an affection for B.M. When Mr. Clandon read through the diary of his wife, his emotions changed a lot. Find appropriate words to describe each stage and find evidence in the text to support your viewpoint. Stage One: Self-satisfied The first pages are full of praise for her new husband. He relived again the early successes of his political career. Stage Two: Relieved He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened. Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. (LL.122~123)

  40. GR-Further Understanding3.2 Stage Three: Curious Who was B.M.? He could not fill in the initials. (LL.124~125) Stage Four: Contempt So B. M. was a man — no doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. Gilbert knew the type, and had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. He could also see him quite distinctly — a stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest day's work in his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through him?

  41. GR-Further Understanding3.3 Stage Five: Alarmed Could it have been his own name? …The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. …Why had Angela never told him? It was very unlike her to conceal anything; she had been the soul of candour. “Luckily” — why luckily? …Where had he been that night?…And B. M. and Angela had spent the evening alone! He tried to recall that evening. Was she waiting up for him when he came back? Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were the chairs drawn close together?

  42. GR-Further Understanding3.4 Stage Six: Furious It became more and more inexplicable to him — the whole situation: his wife receiving an unknown man alone. There on the very first page was that cursed fellow again. The scoundrel had asked her to become his mistress. Alone in his room! The blood rushed to Gilbert Clandon's face. He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she told him? How could she have hesitated for an instant?

  43. GR-Further Understanding4.1 For Part 4 Presentation Work in groups, discuss the following points and then choose a representative to present your results to the whole class. What was the story between Angela and B.M.? Why did Angela commit suicide? Had Angela planned for Gilbert to meet Sissy Miller after her death? Or, in other words, is Sissy Miller a key to interpreting her legacy to Gilbert? What kind of woman was Angela? What is the true legacy for Gilbert? What would Gilbert think afterwards? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

  44. TEXT There were gifts for all her friends. But what had his wife left behind her for him?

  45. TEXT-S-1 The Legacy Virginia Woolf "For Sissy Miller." Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love." It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

  46. TEXT-W-1 The Legacy Virginia Woolf "For Sissy Miller." Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love." It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

  47. TEXT-S-1.1 The Legacy Virginia Woolf 1. What is the part of speech of the word “like”? What does it mean? "For Sissy Miller." Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love." The word “like” is a preposition. It means “in the typical manner of”. 2. Find the antonym of “like” in the following text. It was very unlike her to conceal anything; she had been the soul of candor. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

  48. TEXT-S-1.2 The Legacy Virginia Woolf "For Sissy Miller." Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love." Paraphrase the clause. “she had been the soul of candor”. “Soul” means “a person typifying a certain quality or idea”. “Candor” means “openness or frankness”. The clause means she is a person who is very frank and honest. She was the soul of discretion. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

  49. TEXT-W-1.1 The Legacy Virginia Woolf foresee: v.see (what is going to happen in the future) in advance "For Sissy Miller." Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love." 我们应该在几个月前就预见到这个麻烦并且做好打算了。 We should have foreseen this trouble months ago and made provisions for it. He could never have foreseen that one day his books would sell in millions. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her. They foresee that deaths from AIDS will have doubled by 2020.

  50. TEXT-S-2 He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this token of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every friend had been left some little token of her affection. Every ring, every necklace, every little Chinese box — she had a passion for little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, bound in green leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, no," he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps." So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.