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THE ELBOW PowerPoint Presentation

THE ELBOW

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THE ELBOW

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  1. THE ELBOW Injuries and Exercises

  2. ELBOW INJURIES • Acute • Chronic (overuse)

  3. Varus and Valgus Forces • Varus: An abnormal inward turning of a bone. • Valgus: An abnormal outward turning of a bone.

  4. Dislocation • Medial dislocation – weak UCL during valgus stress. • Valgus stress stretches the UCL and compresses the humeroradial joint (think abduction). • Common

  5. Dislocation • Lateral dislocation – weak RCL during varus • Varus stress stretches the RCL and compresses the humeroulnar joint. (think adduction)

  6. Dislocation • Posterolateral dislocation • Posterior displacement of the ulna • Can fracture the coronoid process

  7. Dislocation of the Elbow

  8. Little League Elbow • Avulsion fracture at the medial epicondyle. • Caused by throwing or a collison

  9. Chronic Injuries • Tennis elbow • Golfers elbow (medial tennis elbow)

  10. Tennis Elbow • AAOS Online Service Fact Sheet Tennis Elbow

  11. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons – Tennis Elbow • Tennis players and golfers are familiar with elbow pain. But baseball players, home fix-it enthusiasts and gardeners also may experience the symptoms of "tennis elbow" or "golfer’s elbow." • Tennis elbow is a painful condition on and around the lateral epicondyle. This location gives tennis elbow its technical name: lateral epicondylitis. • Pain may radiate down the arm. • Gripping or extending the wrist may intensify the pain. • Golfer’s elbow describes a similar condition. • The pain focus is the medial epicondyle so it is technically known as medial epicondylitis.

  12. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons – Tennis Elbow • Both tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow typically result from repetitive arm movement. • Over-using the muscles in the arm can lead to tiny tears in the tendons that attach the muscles to the epicondyles. • If the activity is continued without allowing the tears to heal, the tendons can become inflamed. • This condition can be caused by excessive use of the arm in long sessions practicing your golf swing or tennis stroke and in many other activities, including painting, raking, pitching, rowing, hammering and using a screwdriver. • If there is tenderness in the elbow or pain that radiates down the arm, discontinue the activity. • Rest allows the microtears to heal. • If the symptoms are sports-related, you might examine your technique and equipment.

  13. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons – Tennis Elbow • Conservative treatment usually works. • Applying ice helps reduce swelling. • An anti-inflammatory medication, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, can also help. • If symptoms don’t subside in two or three weeks, an arm brace may be required for some time. • Occasionally, injections of cortisone-based steroidal medication may be used. • Flexibility and strengthening exercises are effective and will eventually allow you to return to the activity.

  14. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Repair • Pitching places stress on the ulnar ligament • Tommy John Surgery • Three holes are drilled; two in the humerus and one in the ulna. • Tendon from palmaris longus. • Tendon is threaded through the holes in a “figure 8” fashion.

  15. 1. Treatment (RICE) • Rest • Ice • Compression • Elevation

  16. 2. Elbow Brace • How does it help?

  17. ELBOW EXERCISES • ExRx • Bodybuilding.com

  18. Wrist Curls

  19. Supination/Pronation

  20. Flexion Preacher Curls Standing Bicep Curls

  21. Extension Close-Grip Press Lying Triceps Extensions