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EVA-UNDERGROUND

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  1. (Download) Eva Underground Eva Underground Dandi Daley Mackall ePub | *DOC | audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF #1156311 in Books Harcourt Children's Books 2006-03-01 2006-03-01Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.25 x .86 x 5.50l, .81 #File Name: 0152054626256 pagesFiction Ages 12 and up | File size: 45.Mb Dandi Daley Mackall : Eva Underground before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised Eva Underground: 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Romantic, Suspenseful TaleBy K. PickettIt's 1978 and Eva Lott is just your average American teenager getting ready to start her senior year of high school. That is, until her dad drags her kicking and screaming to Communist Poland. He wants to help the local people with a radical underground

  2. literacy movement and Eva soon becomes a part of that world. She learns that the average Pole does not have basic freedoms and that their daily lives are downright dangerous at times. Forget about good old American pepperoni pizza, rock-n-roll and freedom of speech. The government is always watching and listening, ready to suppress and control. Most people are poor, with little coal to heat their homes and even less to eat. (To paint a picture for you, bread with lard is something of a delicacy!)If you were in Eva's shoes, wouldn't you want to hop on the next flight out of the country and get back to the good old USA? That was Eva's plan. Until she met Tomek. Ah...Tomek! The handsome, moody and so intelligent boy who draws her into his world and captures her heart. Through their unusual friendship, Tomek opens Eva's eyes to the sheer beauty of the Polish country and the brave struggles of those fighting for freedom and independence within.I absolutely fell in love with this book. I think the romantic cover captured my heart from the start! I really enjoyed Eva's progression from your typical self involved American teen to the soulful, passionate person she became during her time in Poland. My favorite aspect of the novel, however, was the manner in which Eva's and Tomek's relationship unfolded. The believable, interesting situations were all beautifully woven through Dandi Daley Mackall's skillful narrative. Alternating the chapters between Eva and Tomek's point of view was a smart move. I think it allowed for a deeper connection to both characters with the way we were able to get inside their different mindsets. If you do read this novel, just wait until you get to the "plum harvest". Those chapters were my absolute favorite. I can honestly say I still carry them with me in my heart.In a 2006 interview with Cynthia Leitich Smith, Dandi Daley Mackall described how she based this book on her own experiences in Poland circa 1978. After reading Eva Underground, I could really appreciate the authenticity of the novel. It was evident to me that Mackall had her finger on the pulse of the Polish heart and soul. I also must admit, I knew little about what life was like in that tumultuous time period of history. Eva Underground really opened my eyes. I honestly felt like I was right there with Eva, suitcases in tote, following along in her footsteps. Eva Underground is a novel that should appeal to readers of all ages, with its romance, suspense and universal issues of freedom and hope.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Interesting Topic, Nice Teen Romance, Lacks SomethingBy Mia N. SearlesThe book takes place in communist Poland, 8 years after the Gdansk riots of 1970 (which you find out was the year that Tomek's older brother was tragically killed). Americans Eva and her father, a college professor, are first introduced at a Czech border crossing. While they sit with tension in the unheated car, waiting for the line to move, we get small glimpses of Eva's life back in Chicago and the events that led to her current life change. Right off the bat we know that being uprooted from everything she knows is not her choice, but her father's. She yearns to be back in Chicago with her best friend and boyfriend and close to where her mother is buried (not a big spoiler since you find that out within the first few pages of the book.) Her father, Professor Lott, has an agenda-- to meet up with Father B. (who is in charge of this underground movement) and teach/train oppressed yet eager Polish students so that one day they can make a stand against a government that wants to keep its people uneducated and ignorant. Once they finally do cross the border (not without difficulty) they meet Tomek, a 19 year old Polish teen who reluctantly takes on the job of escort and translator for the American professor. Just like Eva, he does not really want to get involved with the underground movement but does because of the money he could earn so that he can buy books and go to school. When Tomek and Eva first meet, they obviously don't like each other. Tomek thinks Eva is spoiled and rich since her father is a college professor and Eva resents Tomek because, well, he represents everything that is foreign to her.The first thing I liked about Eva Underground is the third person narrative that switches perspectives between 17 year old Eva and 19 year old Polish Tomek. Up until the Twilight series, I was never a big fan of first person narration, probably because I had my brain trained to reading romance novels, mythology, historical and fantasy epics,-- all of which are mostly written in third person. Okay, and I will admit that I tend to be nosy-- I like to know what's going on in other character's heads and their views throughout a story. Once I started getting into YA literature, I noticed a trend of first person narration and I learned to actually enjoy it. (I'm always up for a challenge and looking for new ways to expand my mind.)Anyway, the shift back to third person narrative in Eva Underground was a nice change of pace for me. The author, Mackall, did a great job with changing perspectives between the two lead characters as well as giving us as the reader good introductory descriptions into Eva and Tomek's livestyles and backgrounds. By the third chapter I felt emotionally invested in both of their causes and couldn't wait to see how things progressed.Like I was saying before, I was exposed early to historical romance and fiction novels but will admit that this is the first story I have read about communist Poland in the 70's. The author does a great job at giving just enough details and situations to express the severe opression that these people were experiencing. You don't have to be an expert on the time period or place to get the general mood of the story.There is one part in particular that I loved in Eva Underground that reminded me of one of my favorite scenes in the movie A Walk in the Clouds (starring Keanu Reeves). In order to get out of doing dish duty (sounds stupid but there are months in Poland where they can't get soap so they kill germs by washing dishes in boiling hot water) Eva convinces Tomek to take her with him to his family's home to help pick plums for the harvest. When they arrive, everyone seems to accept her but Lukasz, Tomek's cousin. They have all gathered to help pick plums from the family orchard before a terribly ice storm hits. With the help of little Stash (Tomek's other cousin) Eva adapts well. She becomes so fast that a competition arises between Eva and Lukasz to see who can get the most plums picked the quickest. This is almost exactly what happens in A Walk in the Clouds only it is Keanu Reeves' character

  3. that is the stranger and he must help pick grapes, not plums. Beings that A Walk in the Clouds was released in 1995, I have to wonder if the similarities are purely coincidental or if the author had a little inspiration? Hmm...Now to the things that bothered me which ultimately is the reason I give this book a 3 out of 5 star rating. The first thing that nagged at my conscience was Eva's father's decision to force his 17 year old daughter to a communist country that is obviously in turmoil. What in the BLEEP was he thinking??? I get that he is still mourning the loss of his wife and living day in and day out in a house full of memories must be like putting salt to a wound. I get that Eva started acting out after her mother's death and perhaps he thought that a change of scenary would do her some good. But to take your daughter out of her last year of high school and drag her to a place where they not only hate their own people but they hate Americans? Don't get me wrong, I am all for helping others. I know sometimes you have to risk your own life for the greater cause. But I just find it either completely negligent or very naive on Professor Lott's part. What solidifies my point even more is the fact that he doesn't even know Polish! I could see if he was fluent in Polish or a similar language, but he actually had to depend on Eva to translate (she can pick of languages quickly) when Tomek was not around.Another thing that left me with some questions was this supposed hatred between Tomek's father and Josef Krysa, Captain of the militia. The author states a few times in later chapters that Krysa is the "hated enemy" of Tomek's father. I wanted to know why. I had a feeling it was in regards to the death of Tomek's older brother years prior but nothing is really developed. I know not everything in a story has to be spelled out but Captain Krysa obviously has a vendetta against Tomek's family. And when the author stated more then once that both older men are mortal enemies, I had to wonder why or how it started. Mackall kind of leaves you hanging and I found it a little disappointing.Lastly, I kind of felt that the love story between Eva and Tomek was...underdeveloped. Throughout most of the book you have Eva thinking of her boyfriend back in Chicago and about halfway through the novel she even tries to make a break for it (You'll see what I mean). Tomek, on the other hand, thinks of Eva as being spoiled and selfish. Since he feels this way through most of the book (he thinks it constantly) I was waiting for some big blow up between the two where Tomek finally tells Eva how he feels, but it never comes. Obviously his opinion of her changes, and vice versa, but I guess the whole sudden love thing between the two felt...unreal. Okay maybe unreal is not the best word to describe it, but I think a couple of more chapters to develop their feelings for each other would have satisfied me more.Eva Underground is a good book if you are reading it for the purpose of educating yourself on this turbulant part of history, whether you are a teenager or adult. I think the author did a great job from a historical perspective as well as giving the reader sufficient description and character backgrounds to reel us in. While the story starts off strong, I think it loses a little steam in the romance department as well as a few underdeveloped story lines such as the bitter fued between Tomek's father and Captain Krysa. Despite my pickiness, I don't regret reading it and would even go so far as to say that if I was teaching history instead of English, I would probably add the book to a mandatory summer reading list.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Fantastic Look into Communist HistoryBy The Allure of BooksEva Underground by Dandi Daley Mackall takes us back to Communist Poland. Our main character, Eva, and her father travel there from Chicago because Eva's father wants to help the radical underground movement. Eva is angry and afraid - she has no desire to be a part of the group or be anywhere but home with her friends in Chicago. Slowly but surely, she becomes immersed in her surroundings and begins to understand the importance of what her father and his friends are trying to accomplish. She also quickly becomes interested in Tomek, the 19 year old translator.I really felt like I got an inside view into a piece of history I had little to no prior knowledge of. I was impressed with the way Dandi was able to both keep things basic enough to be easily understood and intense enough to feel harsh and realistic. It doesn't take long for Eva to begin to face the harsh realities of life head on. As she becomes more interested in the people around her, she is introduced to her own shortcomings (namely, being a spoiled American) and ends up trying to grow into a person she can look in the mirror and be proud of.One of my favorite parts of the book is when she travels with Tomek to his family's plum orchard. She initially goes only to try and get in with Tomek, but once she is there - she falls in love, not only with him, but with his family and community. She discovers the beauty of people - even when under intense pressure from the government and from the simple fact of being poor - she sees people refuse to compromise integrity, honesty and basic human decency.This is not one of the books that is written in such a way that the reader becomes a part of the story. I always felt very much like an onlooker versus a participant. So, while I don't feel that the writing itself is extraordinary on its own, I do believe that the story it told is. There is a lot of intensity and tension packed into a fairly short book; I definitely recommend taking the time to read it! The year 1978 has been a pretty good one for Eva Lott. She has a terrific best friend, she's dating the best-looking guy in school, and she just made the varsity swim team. So when her widowed dad says it's time for them to move, she's not exactly thrilled. And when he tells her that he intends to move to Communist Poland to help with a radical underground movement . . . Well, it's all downhill from there. Soon Eva has been transplanted from her comfortable Chicago suburb to a land that doesn't even have meat in its stores, let alone Peter Frampton records. And everywhere she goes, the government is watching. But Eva begins to warm to her new life. Sometime between eating lard on bread and dodging the militia, she makes a handsome new friend, Tomek. And soon she is wondering if maybe she's found

  4. home in the most unlikely of places. From School Library JournalGrade 7 UpPlace Eva Lott, high school senior from Chicago, behind the Iron Curtain in pre-Solidarity Poland circa 1978 with cute and brooding political activist Tomek and you have a combination of romance and socially conscious historical fiction. Following her mother's death, the teen's English professor father uproots her in order to participate in the underground movement. The border crossing is terrifying, the weather icy, and food and supplies are virtually nonexistent. She plots to sneak away to the airport and desperately longs for the friends and comforts of home. In time, she begins to understand the oppression that the Polish underground is fighting and the hope of freedom that they hold dear. Her father teaches the novice journalists who anticipate the arrival of the forbidden printing press that will enable them to disseminate the truth, if they can get it past a ruthless militia. Eva's trip to Tomek's home to harvest the family's plums before a devastating ice storm and her later dangerous journey to transport the illegal printing press create the expected transformation from spoiled American teen to enlightened supporter of the cause. It takes a few chapters for the pace to become compelling, and the characters emerge somewhat slowly, but readers with an interest in world social and political issues will enjoy this distinctive human portrayal of a troubling time and place mixed with burgeoning young love.Suzanne Gordon, Richards Middle School, Lawrenceville, GA Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistGr. 8-11. In 1978 high-school-senior Eva Lott leaves her comfortable life in the Chicago suburbs for Communist Poland, where her father is teaching in the underground education movement. Coping with the recent death of her mother from cancer, Eva now has to contend with the boredom and loneliness of living in a foreign country. After a botched attempt to run away and make her way back to Chicago, Eva develops a friendship with Tomek, a young underground leader, and a romance blossoms, giving her a desire to stay. This otherwise standard coming-of-age love story is made more unusual by a strong sense of time and place. Mackall effectively conveys the harsh realities of living under a Communist regime and the sense of hope for a better future among Poles that came with the rise of Lech Walesa and the Solidarity Movement and the election of the first Polish pope. Ed SullivanCopyright American Library Association. All rights reserved First Eva's mother dies from cancer. Then her father decides to drag her to Communist Poland. He wants to "make a difference" by teaching for a year in an underground education movement. But Eva wants to stay put in Chicago. She's got a hot boyfriend, the best friend in the whole world, and a new position on the varsity swim team. Sure, her grades are slipping. Yes, she got busted for shoplifting. But that is hardly grounds for forcing her to interrupt her senior year--even if her father is adamant the experience will be good for her. Eva hates everything about Poland. The weather is crappy, there is next to nothing to eat, and she has to share a tiny, unheated room with her father. Even more irritating, the government is always watching. But like the sun that eventually pokes through the clouds, Eva's heart begins to soften toward the students her father has come to teach. And when she falls in love, Eva has to decide whether she really wants to leave. Mackall has crafted a fine story. Readers will be enticed by the interaction between Eva and her father, and the close calls between the students and thuggish soldiers. Most satisfying is the personal growth that Eva eventually allows herself. The book's glossary is helpful for keeping up with the Polish phrases that pepper the dialogue. 2006, Harcourt Books, Ages 12 up. (Children's Literature -Sheri Bell-Rehwoldt )Grade 7 UpPlace Eva Lott, high school senior from Chicago, behind the Iron Curtain in pre-Solidarity Poland circa 1978 with cute and brooding political activist Tomek and you have a combination of romance and socially conscious historical fiction. Following her mother's death, the teen's English professor father uproots her in order to participate in the underground movement. The border crossing is terrifying, the weather icy, and food and supplies are virtually nonexistent. She plots to sneak away to the airport and desperately longs for the friends and comforts of home. In time, she begins to understand the oppression that the Polish underground is fighting and the hope of freedom that they hold dear. Her father teaches the novice journalists who anticipate the arrival of the forbidden printing press that will enable them to disseminate the truth, if they can get it past a ruthless militia. Eva's trip to Tomek's home to harvest the family's plums before a devastating ice storm and her later dangerous journey to transport the illegal printing press create the expected transformation from spoiled American teen to enlightened supporter of the cause. It takes a few chapters for the pace to become compelling, and the characters emerge somewhat slowly, but readers with an interest in world social and political issues will enjoy this distinctive human portrayal of a troubling time and place mixed with burgeoning young love.Suzanne Gordon, Richards Middle School, Lawrenceville, GA (School Library Journal )Gr. 8-11. In 1978 high-school-senior Eva Lott leaves her comfortable life in the Chicago suburbs for Communist Poland, where her father is teaching in the underground education movement. Coping with the recent death of her mother from cancer, Eva now has to contend with the boredom and loneliness of living in a foreign country. After a botched attempt to run away and make her way back to Chicago, Eva develops a friendship with Tomek, a young underground leader, and a romance blossoms, giving her a desire to stay. This otherwise standard coming-of-age love story is made more unusual by a strong sense of time and place. Mackall effectively conveys the harsh realities of living under a Communist regime and the sense of hope for a better future among Poles that came with the rise of Lech Walesa and the Solidarity Movement and the election

  5. of the first Polish pope. Ed Sullivan (Booklist )