Download
promoting positive youth development health and well being through life skills training n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Promoting Positive Youth Development, Health, and Well-Being through Life Skills Training PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Promoting Positive Youth Development, Health, and Well-Being through Life Skills Training

Promoting Positive Youth Development, Health, and Well-Being through Life Skills Training

114 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Promoting Positive Youth Development, Health, and Well-Being through Life Skills Training

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Promoting Positive Youth Development, Health, and Well-Beingthrough Life Skills Training Christopher Williams, Ph.D. Pamela Werb, MEd National Health Promotion Associates This product is supported by Florida Department of Children and Families Substance Abuse and Mental Health Program Office funding.

  2. Overview • Background • Theory and Description • Effectiveness • Potential for Educational Outcomes • Botvin LifeSkills Training • Implementation Considerations • Q & A

  3. Background

  4. Priority Health-Risk Behaviors Monitored by CDC (YRBSS) • Behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of mortality and morbidity • Tobacco use • Alcohol and other drug use • Motor vehicle accidents • Other unintentional injuries • Violence (Suicide, Homicide) • Sexual behaviors • Unhealthy dietary behaviors • Inadequate physical activity

  5. Prevention Science • Advances in Etiology and Prevention • Multiple health behaviors • Toward a unified field • Convergence • Similar etiologic factors and course • Shared methods and theories • Similar effective approaches

  6. Institute Of Medicine Classification:Continuum of Care

  7. Early Prevention Efforts: Ineffective • Health Information • Scare Tactics • School Assembly Programs • Ineffective • Drug information programs increased use in some studies

  8. Evidence-Based Approaches • Tested and Proven Effective • Well-Designed (Randomized Control Trials) • Carefully Executed • Rigorous Research Methods • Appropriate Data Analysis • Published in Peer-Reviewed Journal • One or More Replications

  9. Etiology Studies Show Hypothesized Mediating Variables Associated with Adolescent Substance Use • Assertiveness • Refusal skills • Decision-making • Problem-solving skills _ Substance Use Behavior • Peer substance use • Perceived norms • Social anxiety • Risk-taking • Positive drug expectancies +

  10. Intervention Effects Observed on Key Hypothesized Mediating Variables • Assertiveness • Refusal skills • Decision-making • Problem-solving skills • Locus of control + Life Skills Training _ • Peer substance use • Perceived norms • Social anxiety • Risk-taking • Positive drug expectancies

  11. Life Skills Training:Conceptual Model and Brief Description

  12. Model of Adolescent Drug Use and Focus of LST Program Socio- Cultural Personal Competence Skills Risk and Protective Factors Family Social Competence Skills Drug Use Social Environment Drug Resistance Skills/ Cognitions Life Skills Training Contextual Factors Individual Factors

  13. Life Skills TrainingMajor Components • Personal Competence • Social Competence • Resistance Skills, Attitudes and Norms

  14. Personal Competence Skills • Problem-Solving and Decision-Making • Personal Behavior Change Skills • Stress and Anxiety Management

  15. Social Competence Skills • Communication Skills • Greetings and Brief Social Exchanges • Meeting New People • Conversational Skills • Complimenting Skills • Assertive Skills

  16. Resistance Skills/Norms Awareness of Drug Use Influences Anti-Drug Use Norms Resistance Skills

  17. Effectiveness

  18. Evidence of Effectiveness Over 30 Peer-Reviewed Studies Short, Intermediate, and Long-term Majority and Minority Youth Tobacco Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use Other Health Outcomes Independent Replication

  19. Methodological Issues • RCT: Cluster Randomization • Validity of Self Report • IDs for Tracking Individual Students • Pretest Equivalence • Differential Attrition/Data Loss • Appropriate Analysis (ICCs, Covariates)

  20. Short-Term Effects

  21. Life Skills Training Short-Term Effects 30 LST Control 25 20 Percent Using Monthly 15 10 5 0 Tobacco* Alcohol** Marijuana*** Source: *Botvin et al. (1982), ** Botvin, Baker et al. (1984), *** Botvin, Baker, Renick et al.(1984).

  22. 20 LST + Booster LST Control 15 Percent Using Weekly 10 5 0 Tobacco* Marijuana** Source: *Botvin et al. (1983), ** Botvin et al. (1990) Life Skills Training Booster Effects

  23. Long-Term Effects: 5 Years (Grade 12)

  24. 21% Reduction LST Control 20% Reduction Life Skills Training Long-Term Effects: Smoking 28% Reduction 30 25 29% Reduction 20 Percent Using 15 10 5 0 Weekly Smoking* Weekly Smoking** Daily Smoking* Daily Smoking** (White Sample) (Minority Sample) (White Sample) (Minority Sample) Source: *Botvin et al. (1995), ** Botvin et al. (2004)

  25. 25% Reduction 38% Reduction 56% Reduction 50% Reduction Life Skills Training Long-Term Effects: Gateway Poly-drug Use & Illicit Drug Use LST Control 30 25 20 Percent Using 15 10 5 0 Polydrug Use* Narcotics** Hallucinogens** Illicit Drug Use** (Weekly) (Lifetime) (Lifetime) (Lifetime) Source: *Botvin et al. (1995), ** Botvin et al. (2000)

  26. Life Skills TrainingBinge Drinking(Botvin et al., 2001)

  27. Long-Term Effects: 5 Years (Grade 12)

  28. Violence and Delinquency Source: Botvin et al.,Preventing youth violence and delinquency through a universal school-based prevention approach. Prevention Science, 2006

  29. Long-Term Follow-Up: 12 Years (Young Adult) Illicit Drug Use

  30. Research Design

  31. Long-Term Follow-Up by Condition

  32. Long-Term Follow-Up by Condition

  33. Potential Educational Outcomes • Attendance, Engagement, and Commitment • Safe, Supportive Learning Environment • Ability to Handle Academic Pressures • Pro-social Engagement with Teachers and Peers • Promotion of Social and Emotional Learning • Better Choices In and Out of Classroom

  34. Q & A

  35. Break

  36. What is Botvin LifeSkills Training?

  37. Personal Self-Management Skills General Social Skills Resistance Skills

  38. Program Providers • Health Educators • Prevention Specialists • Peer Leaders • Teachers

  39. Teaching Methods • Facilitate Discussion • Teach Skills • Provide Reinforcement • Provide Opportunities for Skills Practice

  40. What is the age range for LST? Ages 8 - 18 The Botvin LifeSkills Training evidence-based approach spans multiple age groups. Materials are adapted for age and developmental appropriateness.

  41. Sessions per Level

  42. Elementary Program Content by Grade/Level

  43. Middle School Program Structure & Content By Grade/Level

  44. High School Program Content

  45. Transitions Program Content PROGRAM FIDELITY: Teach the lessons in order at least one time per week in consecutive weeks, allow 45 – 50 minutes per lesson and deliver all of the activities in the lesson. 49

  46. Skills Training Instruction Demonstration Behavior Rehearsal Feedback Reinforcement Extended Practice