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Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION ONE: Early Eastern Slavs PowerPoint Presentation
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Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION ONE: Early Eastern Slavs

Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION ONE: Early Eastern Slavs

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Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION ONE: Early Eastern Slavs

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  1. Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION ONE: Early Eastern Slavs (pages 347 – 349) Monitoring Comprehension Who governed the villages of Eastern Slavs? How did Eastern Slavs clear the heavily forested land? What did Eastern Slavs do with wood from the forests? In what ways did trade help the eastern Slavs? • The oldest male governed with the help of a council. • He assigned villagers different farming tasks, judged quarrels and acted as a military leader in time of war. • Farmers used a method called slash and burn to clear heavily forested land. • They cut down trees which they burned for fertilizer. • After a few years, they moved to another place. • The forests provided them with all the timber they needed. • They made musical instruments, boats and izbas – one-room log cabins with a gabled roof and wooden window frames. • The Slavs built many trading towns along the riverbanks. • Merchants gathered furs, honey and forest products and traded in the markets of Byzantium for cloth, wine, weapons and jewelry. • Trade helped them live more comfortably and develop their civilization.

  2. Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION TWO: Kievan Rus (pages 397 – 352) SUMMARIZING Kievan Rus Vladimir I and the Eastern Orthodox Church Yaroslav the Wise Decline of Kievan Rus • A Varangian named Oleg established the state of Kievan Rus • Kievwas its capital • Main ruler was the Grand Prince who was helped by local merchants and boyars • A veche handled the daily matters of towns • Prince of Kiev • Sent people to other lands to find a religion • He chose Eastern Orthodox Christianity • Brought Byzantine culture to Kievan Rus • His people had a sense of belonging to a civilized world • Son of Vladimir • Interested in learning • Encouraged artisans to practice their skills • Developed closer ties with western Europe by family marriages • Organized Kievan Rus laws based on Slavic custom and Byzantine law • Princes fought over throne after Yaroslav’s death • Trade was interrupted by attacks • Changed from trading land to a land where people again farmed

  3. Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION THREE: The Mongol Conquest (pages 353 – 354) COMPARING AND CONTRASTING The Rich The Peasants • Had to serve in Mongol armies • Mongol rule caused them to cling to religion • People became distrustful of ideas from other countries • Rarely ate meat • Entertainment consisted of visits to friends and storytelling • Wore linen clothes, wrapped rags around their legs for warmth • Shoes were made from tree bark • Entertained guests with large feasts of deer and other meats • Wore tall fur hats and caftans Both

  4. Chapter 23 The Eastern Slavs 500 A.D. – 1035 A.D. SECTION FOUR: The Rise of Moscow (pages 354 – 358) CLARIFYING How did Ivan the Great and Ivan the Terrible rise to power? How did the Muscovite people feel about Ivan the Great and Ivan the Terrible? How did each czar pass his throne to the next? • Ivan the Great became prince of Moscow. • He ended Mongol control and expanded the Muscovy boundaries. • He married a Byzantine empress and began living in the style of emperors. • He called himself czar. • Ivan the Terrible was crowned czar. • He was mistreated by the boyars when growing up. He ignored them when he was in power. • He conquered most of the Mongol territories. • He was given authority to punish traitors. His Oprichnina killed thousands. • The people liked both rulers. • It was believed that they protected their country from enemies. • Muscovites believed that the czars should have full power over both Church and state. • Ivan the Great passed the throne to his heirs, and eventually to Ivan the Terrible. • Ivan the Terrible did not have a suitable heir to pass on his throne. This caused confusion and disorder in Muscovy.