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16.1 THE CONTROL UNIT’S MICRO-OPERATIONS By: MERLE SODEN 16.2 CONTROL OF THE PROCESSOR PowerPoint Presentation
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16.1 THE CONTROL UNIT’S MICRO-OPERATIONS By: MERLE SODEN 16.2 CONTROL OF THE PROCESSOR

16.1 THE CONTROL UNIT’S MICRO-OPERATIONS By: MERLE SODEN 16.2 CONTROL OF THE PROCESSOR

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16.1 THE CONTROL UNIT’S MICRO-OPERATIONS By: MERLE SODEN 16.2 CONTROL OF THE PROCESSOR

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  1. CHAPTER 16 Control Unit Operation 16.1 THE CONTROL UNIT’S MICRO-OPERATIONS By: MERLE SODEN 16.2 CONTROL OF THE PROCESSOR By: YULEISYS TORRES 16.3 HARDWIRE IMPLEMENTATION By: LESTHER MARTI

  2. MICRO-OPERATIONS In this presentation today I hope to give you a better understanding of what the term “micro-operations” means in the instruction cycle as it pertains to the Control Unit.

  3. CONTROL UNIT • We cannot begin a discussion about micro-operations of the CONTROL UNIT unless we first discuss the CONTROL UNIT itself. • If you don’t already know, the control unit is that portion of the CPU that actually initiates instructions. • It is similar to your brain creating a thought.

  4. INSTRUCTIONS • When I refer to the word INSTRUCTION, I am referring to a cycle of commands initiated by the CONTROL UNIT to carry out the thought of a user. The following are a list of instructions that you are already familiar with. • FETCH • INDIRECT • INTERRUPT • EXECUTE • INSTRUCTION

  5. Getting back to the term: micro-operations • In each movement of the previous cycles (ie. Fetch…) the instructions are executed during an instruction cycle made up of shorter cycles. • Because the performance of each sub cycle involves one or more shorter operations we coin the term “Micro-Operations”.

  6. Let me explain further • As we already know the beginning of the instructions cycle starts with the FETCH CYCLE. Right? • Now you might be thinking to yourself, “Yeah, I already know about the fetch cycle, and the indirect cycle and the interrupt cycle and all that stuff right?”

  7. Still wondering what that has to do with the micro-operations? • And so you are also probably wondering what does that have to do with Micro Operations in the control unit right?

  8. Cycles • Well let me answer that for you. • Lets start with the FETCH CYCLE and see what happens there; • In the FETCH CYCLE, we know the following;

  9. WHAT HAPPENS DURING THE FETCH CYCLE? • The address of the next instruction to be executed is in the program counter • The first step is to move that address to the memory address register (MAR), • The second step is to bring the address (in the MAR) and place it on the address bus. • (And don’t forget the PC will increment by 1 to get ready for the next instruction.) • At this time, the control unit issues a READ command on the control bus, and the result appears on the (MDR). • The last step is to move the contents of the MDR to the instruction register (IR). • Symbolic short hand description of the moves. • PC------MAR • PC+1----PC • RAM---MDR • MDR---IR • - OR - • t1: MAR (PC) • t2: MBR Memory • -PC (PC) + I • t3: IR (MBR) • * Where the notation (t1, t2, t3) represents successive time units or clock pulses

  10. DIAGRAM OF PROGRAM EXECUTION

  11. MICRO-OPERATIONS - SIMPLY PUT As you can see, in the FETCH CYCLE, although there are three operations, there are actually four micro-operations, and each micro-operation involves the movement of data into or out of a register.

  12. Indirect Cycles • Let’s look at The Indirect Cycle it’s the same thing, • Once an instruction is fetched, the next step is to fetch the operands. This creates more operations and micro-operations. • Symbolic short hand description of the moves. • t1: MAR +- (IR(Address)) • t2: MBR <— Memory • t3: IR(Address) — (MBR(Address))

  13. The Interrupt Cycle • Next let’s look at The Interrupt Cycle • At the completion of the execute cycle, a test is made to determine whether any enabled interrupts have occurred. If so, the interrupt cycle occurs. • Here are its Operations and micro-operations • Symbolic short hand description of the moves. • t1: MBR (PC) • t2: MAR Save-address • PC +- Routine-address • t3: Memory +- (MBR)

  14. Last but not least  • Last but not least let’s look at The Execute Cycle. • First; consider an add instruction: • ADD R1, X • This particular case adds the contents of the location X to register R1. The following sequence of operations and micro-operations might occur: • Symbolic short hand description of the moves. • t1: MAR (IR(address)), • t2: MBR Memory • t3: RI- (RI) + (MBR)

  15. In closing In closing we have seen that each phase of the instruction cycle can be decomposed into a sequence of elementary movements called micro-operations. Thank you.

  16. Control of the Processor The Control Unit is the engine that moves the computer. It is the responsibility of the control unit to cause the execution of instructions.

  17. Functional requirements Control Unit: Basic elements of a processor. Micro-operations that processor performs. Functions that the control unit must perform to allow the execution of the micro-operations.

  18. essential elements of processor The basic elements of a processor are: The ALU Registers Internal data path External data path Control Unit

  19. Micro-operations • Micro-operations : • Transfer data between registers • Perform arithmetic or logical operations using registers as sources and as destinations for result. • Transfer data from outside the processor to a register. • Transfer data from a register to outside the processor.

  20. TASKS • The control unit performs two elementary tasks: • Sequencing • Execution

  21. Control signals • Control signals: • Externally • Input that gives the status of system. • Outputs that allow it to manipulate the system. • Internally • The capabilities to perform sequencing and execution. • Three types of control signals: • Trigger ALU functions • Trigger a data path • External triggers (to bus or other external element)

  22. Input and output Control signals IR • Inputs: • Clock • Instruction Register (IR) • Flags • Control Signals from Control Bus Control signals within CPU Flags Control Unit Control signals from system bus Clock Control signals to system bus Control bus • Outputs: • Control Signals to Control Bus • Control Signals within processor

  23. Control signals • Control unit keeps track of what part in the instruction cycle it is currently in. • Fetch Cycle: • Transfer contents of PC to MAR. • Read memory into the MBR and increment the PC. • End of Fetch Cycle: • Indirect cycle or execute cycle.

  24. Control signals - simulation Fetch MBR AC PC IR + 1 ALU MAR Control Signals Control Unit Control Signals

  25. Internal processor organization • A single internal bus • Gates and control • Additional control signals • Two additional registers. Y and Z. • Register Z

  26. Intel pentium • In the Intel Pentium 4, which was introduced in 2000 is here Intel has redesigned their microprocessor architecture. • 42 million transistors • Started new trend • Supports SSE3 • FPU • SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) • Additional MMX registers • Addditonal MMX Instruction code • The execution unit is capable of processing multiple instructions concurrently. • Simple integer processes performed and stored in the out-of-order area in C.U. until needed. • Complex integer and floating-point processes are streamlined. • Registers used as local storage.

  27. Hardwired Implementation • Combinatorial circuit • Type of logic circuit • Input logic signals are transformed into a set of output signals • Control unit signals Logic circuit Input signal Output signal

  28. Hardwired Implementation • Control unit inputs • Instruction register • Flags • Controls bus signals • Clock

  29. Model of control unit

  30. Control unit with decoded inputs

  31. Hardwired Implementation • Instruction register • Stores the instruction currently being executed • Holds the instruction while it is being decoded • Uses an op-code to perform different instructions • Unique logic for each op-code • Decoder takes encoded input and produces single output

  32. Flowchart for instruction cycle

  33. Hardwired Implementation • Flags • Status register • Contains current state of the processor • Stores binary values or codes • One or more bits • Each bit means something

  34. Hardwired Implementation • Control bus signals • Wiring of the control unit • Communicates the CPU with other devices within the computer • Differs from the Address and Data bus • Carries commands from the CPU and returns status signals from the device

  35. Hardwired Implementation • Clock • Controls the signals in the control unit during the instruction cycle • Repetitive sequence of pulses • Measures the duration of micro-operations • Long periods to allow propagation of signals • Needs a counter with different control signals for t1, t2 etc.

  36. Problems with hardwired designs • Complex sequencing & micro-operation logic • Difficult to design and test • Inflexible design • Difficult to add new instructions

  37. ReferencES: Book and related websites • Book: • Computer Organization and Architecture • By: William Stallings(Preferred) • Websites: • www.wikipedia.org • http://books.google.com/books?id=XaotdB-I-ekC&pg=PA182&lpg=PA182&dq=%22intel+pentium%22%22processor%22%22control+unit%22&source=web&ots=ow69JFaU49&sig=XhLfi45L9ssxzgdd3nLFHLVye48&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=7&ct=result#PPA192,M1 • http://books.google.com/books?id=ZFDqpSUPwAgC&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=%22intel+pentium%22%22processor%22%22control+unit%22&source=web&ots=X4O6XOoa7n&sig=Muj-t8KIAPYyyxs3e7CMfecf2F0&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=10&ct=result#PPA37,M1 • http://books.google.com/books?id=ZFDqpSUPwAgC&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=%22intel+pentium%22%22processor%22%22control+unit%22&source=web&ots=X4O6XOoa7n&sig=Muj-t8KIAPYyyxs3e7CMfecf2F0&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=10&ct=result#PPA38,M1

  38. Review questions • What are the two basic tasks of the control unit? • What provides the status of the processes? • What is used to transfer information in and out of the processor? • What is the importance of the control unit? • What is a micro-operation? • What cycle initiates the instruction cycle? • What are the four control unit inputs? • What does the control bus signal do? • What does the instruction register do? • What might possibly happen in each time cycle? • -