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Maximizing Effectiveness Using Positive Behavior Support Methods in the Classroom: Individualized Adaptations PowerPoint Presentation
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Maximizing Effectiveness Using Positive Behavior Support Methods in the Classroom: Individualized Adaptations

Maximizing Effectiveness Using Positive Behavior Support Methods in the Classroom: Individualized Adaptations

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Maximizing Effectiveness Using Positive Behavior Support Methods in the Classroom: Individualized Adaptations

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  1. Maximizing Effectiveness Using Positive Behavior Support Methods in the Classroom:Individualized Adaptations

  2. Objectives • Understand the 5 steps to making individualized adaptations in the classroom. • Create potential adaptations for a case study example

  3. Beyond Good Practice • Using good teaching practices is not always enough • The continued problem behavior of students CAN signal a need to further address teaching strategies and curriculum content at a more individualized level.

  4. Curriculum and Instruction • Curriculum provides a blueprint for learning that teachers can follow in designing instruction • Curriculum helps an educator meet community, parental, and student expectations for quality in education

  5. Why Focus on Curriculum? • Typically there are no established curricula for children with low-incidence populations • During inclusion planning it is rarely clear how to determine what to teach students with complex learning needs (personalized curricula) • To ensure that instruction will achieve desired life outcomes

  6. When to Address Curriculum & Instruction • During a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) process, the hypotheses about the function of problem behaviors include avoidance of academic tasks/activities • Upon receiving instruction/direction problem behavior may occur. These may include: • Off-task • Out-of-area • Misuse of materials • Non-compliance • Escalation upon redirection to task

  7. Process for Individualized Adaptations:Identifying individual student problem areas within a classroom environment My Problem Areas…

  8. Steps for Making Individualized Adaptations • Step 1. Identify problem behavior(s) • Step 2. Gather information about the student/Gather information about the task and/or setting • Step 3. Develop a hypothesis about the behavior • Step 4. Develop adaptations • Step 5. Monitor and evaluate adaptations

  9. Step 1: Identify Problems • Consider all information gathered, including the FBA • Identify problem behaviors that occur during learning activities/tasks • Investigate the curriculum, instruction, and ecological elements of the task during which problem behaviors occur

  10. Step 2: Gather Information about the Student • Social and academic skill & performance levels • Response styles • Learning styles • Preferences/interests

  11. Step 2: Gather Information about Task/Setting • Curricular Factors • Scope & sequence objectives • Presentation methods • Content • Instructional Factors • Teaching methods • Response opportunities for students • Activities for acquisition, mastery • Teacher responses • Ecological Factors • Physical arrangement • Predictability of environment • Equipment & materials available Curricular Factors… Instructional Factors… Ecological Factors…

  12. Step 3: Develop Hypotheses • Review hypotheses developed during FBA • Consider a more refined hypothesis about the function of the problem behavior in the given task/setting • Revise hypotheses to more clearly establish the link between instructional and curricular elements and student behavior

  13. Hypothesis Statement Framework • Whenthis occurs (describe the context/tasks or setting) • The student will (describe behavior) • In order to (identify function of behavior) • Example: When Sara is given a non-preferred task or non-functional task, disruptive behaviors (run around the room, throw her books, shout at the teacher) will increase in frequency, in order to escape the task.

  14. Step 4: Develop Adaptations • Use: • Hypotheses about the function of the problem behavior • Student functioning, preferences, etc… • To create adaptations to: • Curriculum • Instruction • Ecology

  15. Three types of Adaptations Adaptations Curriculum Adapt what is taught Instructional Adapt how it is taught and how learning is demonstrated Ecological Adapt the setting – where, when, and with whom

  16. Video Example: Jill • Jill is a 13-yr. old girl described as having severe emotional disturbances, mild retardation, schizophrenia, and attention deficit disorder. • Reading and Math performance levels are 3 years behind grade level • First Video Segment – • Aggressive behaviors, non-compliance • Disliked paper/pencil and writing assignments • Second Video Segment – • Jill was provided with choices and meaningful activities • Jill was able to take pictures in the morning that were incorporated into meaningful writing activities.

  17. Activity: Case Study Ann • Review the sample provided in your packet: Individualized Problem Solving Worksheet: Sara Example • Watch Video Clip for Ann and read case study handout • Complete Steps 1-3 to the best of your ability as a large group • Review each section and share information

  18. Activity: Case Study Ann (Part 2) • Based on information from the case study and video, suggest some curricular adaptations that might be beneficial.

  19. Instructional Adaptations Two types of instructional adaptations Student Responses or Output ModalityFormat/Material Instructional Presentation AlternationModalityFormat/MaterialsTask DivisionChoices

  20. Activity: Case Study Ann (Part 3) • Based on information from the case study and video, suggest some instructionaladaptations that might be beneficial.

  21. Ecological Adaptations Three types of ecological adaptations Who Adapt the staff or grouping When Adapt the schedule Where Adapt the place

  22. Video Example: Irene • 5th grade girl with Downs Syndrome in a full inclusion classroom • Some off-task behaviors, disrupts other students • Video segment – • Participating in whole group presentation with a peer

  23. Activity: Case Study Ann (Part 6) • Based on information from the case study and video, suggest some ecologicaladaptations that might be beneficial.

  24. Step 5: Monitor/Evaluate • Monitor student problem behavior and academic participation • Determine if adaptations are having a positive effect • Make additional/different adaptations if behaviors are not positively impacted • Continue to monitor over time

  25. Activity: Case Study Ann (Part 7) • Based on information from the case study and video, suggest ways to monitor and evaluate adaptations that were suggested.

  26. Activity: Case Study Ann (Final) • Watch the video segment for Ann that depicts adaptations and modifications that were made to her curriculum, instruction, and ecology.