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The Botany of Desire

The Botany of Desire. hum2461 Instructor: Ericka Ghersi. Human being and Nature. Bees and flowers (coevolution) Traditional distinction between subject and object is meaningless Author and his garden (potato) Relation is the same bees and flowers have. Selection.

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The Botany of Desire

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  1. The Botany of Desire hum2461 Instructor: Ericka Ghersi

  2. Human being and Nature • Bees and flowers (coevolution) • Traditional distinction between subject and object is meaningless • Author and his garden (potato) • Relation is the same bees and flowers have

  3. Selection • Selection versus sensorial (xv-1a) • Did I choose? (xv-1b) • Domesticated species (“we are in charge”[?]) • Domesticated species versus “wild” (xvi-2b) • But what do we know about the dog? (xvi-3) • Plants versus animals. Who are more interesting?

  4. Plants and ancient civilizations • Tulips and potatos (xvii-4) • Artificial selection (4b)

  5. Author’s premise • Human desires form a part of natural history in the same way the hummingbird’s love of red does, or the ant’s taste for the aphid’s honeydew. • Four desires: • Sweetness • Beauty • Intoxication • Control (xviii-5)

  6. Domestication • Ancient civilizations and domestication: • What do we know? • How do you look at it when a person talks about it? • Are we receptive? (xviii-6) • Who is older?, plants, animals or human beings? (xix-7a) • PLANTS (xix-7b) • What do we offer to history? Consciousness (independency) versus inventing photosynthesis and perfecting organic chemistry without hurting nature. (8)

  7. Carriers • Who is the subject and who is the object? • Immobility - defense (xx-9) • how do we explain the relationship between beings and plants? • Role of the animals before agriculture started: • any relation with the book PopolVuh? • Evolution evolves (xx-10)

  8. What is evolution? • In what way evolution goes? • Who is the subject and who, the object? • Meaning (xxi-11) • Design in nature (xxi-12) • In a coevolutionary relationship every subject is a subject and vice versa.

  9. Charles Darwin:The Origin of Species • Artificial selection versus natural selection (xxii-13) • Human desire (14) • Artificial from natural selection has blurred. • Man over nature (15)

  10. Conclusion • Outside and Inside: • We still believe that domestic species implies “species have come in or been brought under civilization’s roof.” (xxiv) • Author’s beliefs (xxiv-16)

  11. His approach to these plants “Man and nature” look at “the Other” (xxv-17)

  12. End of “Introduction”

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