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School-wide Application of Positive Behavior Support

School-wide Application of Positive Behavior Support

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School-wide Application of Positive Behavior Support

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  1. School-wide Application of Positive Behavior Support Building Primary Systems and Practices

  2. Purpose • Understand effective responses to problem behavior • Review implementation features of PBS • Self-evaluate implementation and outcomes associated with School-wide PBS • EBS Survey, School Safety Survey, Team Checklist, Office Discipline Referrals, SET • Link School-wide PBS approach and “bully proofing” logic • Review effective instructional approach to teaching school-wide behavior expectations

  3. Challenges • Doing more with less • Educating a greater number of students who are increasingly more different from each other • Educating students with severe problem behavior • Creating sustainable cultures of competence

  4. Challenges • More than 50% of all crime in the United States is committed by 5-7% of youth between the ages of 10-20 • APA Commission on Youth Violence, 1993 • Each school day 100,000 students in the United States bring weapons to school • Walker, 1994

  5. Challenges • 7.4% of students surveyed reported that they had been threatened or injured by a weapon during the past year • 4% reported that they missed at least one day of school because they felt unsafe • Center for Disease Control’s Center for Injury Prevention and Control (1997)

  6. Schools are Important and Good! Schools provide: • Regular, predictable, positive learning and teaching environments • Positive adult and peer models • Regular positive reinforcement • Academic and social behavior development and success

  7. Main Messages STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Good Teaching Behavior Management Increasing District & State Competency and Capacity Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and Systems

  8. Factors Contributing to Antisocial Behaviors • Home • Community • School

  9. Home • Inconsistent management • Reactive discipline • Lack of monitoring • Dishion & Patterson

  10. Community • Antisocial network of peers • Lack of prosocial engagements • Biglan

  11. School • Reactive/punishing discipline approach • Lack of agreement about rules, expectations, and consequences • Lack of staff support • Failure to consider and accommodate individual differences • Academic failure • Mayer

  12. Responses to Antisocial Behavior • Reviews of over 500 studies indicate that the least effective responses to school violence are: • Punishment • Counseling • Psychotherapy

  13. Exclusion is the most common response for conduct disordered youth (Lane & Murakami, 1987) • Punishing problem behaviors without a school-wide system of support is associated with increased (a) aggression, (b) vandalism, (c truancy, (d) tardiness, and (e) dropping out (Mayer, 1995; Mayer & Sulzer-Azaroff, 1991)

  14. The Most Effective Responses Educators Can Make to School Violence Include: • Social skills instruction • Behaviorally-based interventions • Academic interventions

  15. Themes • School environments that are positive, preventive, predictable, and effective:(a) are safer, healthier, and more caring;(b) have enhanced learning and teaching outcomes; and(c) can provide a continuum of behavior support for all students

  16. Reducing ethnic overrepresentation is a matter of:-Creating successful school environments-Separating disabilities from cultural differences, political influences, and SES • Understanding that the causes of low academic performance and challenging behavior do not reside solely within the child or family (Meyer & Patton, 2001)

  17. 0 Domains for Hypothesis Generation Peer Influences Curriculum Learner Home/ Community Classroom Environment Focus on “alterable” rather than “unalterable” hypotheses

  18. Implementation Features • Establish EBS leadership team • Secure School-wide agreements and supports • Establish data-based action plan • Arrange for high fidelity implementation • Conduct formative data-based monitoring

  19. GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Team Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  20. Establish EBS Leadership Team • Behavioral capacity • School, student, family and district representation • Active administrator participation • Efficient communications and staff development • Leadership and decision-making status • Data-based decision-making and problem-solving

  21. Working Smarter

  22. Sample Teaming Matrix

  23. Team Review • Complete the Working Smarter Committee Review Form • Complete the Getting Started-Team Status Checklist • Add items to action plan as needed

  24. Agreements Prioritized data-based need and action 3-4 year commitment Proactive instructional approach Supports Administrative leadership Prioritized resources Materials, personnel On-going coaching Time Secure School-wide Agreements and Supports

  25. Establish Data-based Action Plan • Use of available and meaningful data • Self-assessment Survey • Behavioral incident data, attendance • Academic achievement • Consideration of multiple systems • Adoption, adaptation, and sustained use of evidence-based practices

  26. Measures • Implementation of School-wide PBS: School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET), Self-assessment • Student problem behavior: office discipline referrals, suspensions, expulsions • Student Academic Achievement: state standardized test scores (3rd Grade) • Fidelity of School-wide PBS Training: Team Implementation Checklist, Coaches Checklist

  27. Referrals per Location

  28. Referrals per Student

  29. Referrals by Time of Day

  30. Office Discipline Referrals Definition Kid-Teacher-Administrator interaction Underestimation of actual behavior Improving usefulness & value Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions Distinction between office v. classroom managed Continuum of behavior support Positive school-wide foundations W/in school comparisons

  31. Do we need to tweak our action plan? How often? Who? What? Where? When? How much? If problem, Which students/staff? What system? What intervention? What outcome? + If many students are making same mistake, consider changing system….not students + Start by teaching, monitoring & rewarding…before increasing punishment

  32. Coaching (why?) • Team start-up support • Team sustainability/accountability • Technical assistance/problem solving • Positive reinforcement • Prompts (“positive nags”) • Public relations/communications • Support network across schools • Link between trainers & teams • Local facilitation

  33. Coaching • Monthly/quarterly contacts • Facilitation • Data management • Team checklist • Professional development • “Positive nag”

  34. Define Expectations • Understand purpose: • Clarify means of communication • Use consistent communication • Teach and review for all students, staff, and settings: • Articulate Matrix • Establishes guidelines: • Keep to five or fewer • State positively • Use common and few words

  35. Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying

  36. Few positive SW expectations defined, taught, & encouraged

  37. Expectations

  38. Teaching Matrix Activity Classroom Lunchroom Bus Hallway Assembly Respect Others • Use inside voice • ________ • Eat your own food • __________ • Stay in your seat • _________ • Stay to right • _________ • Arrive on time to speaker • __________ Respect Environment & Property • Recycle paper • _________ • Return trays • __________ • Keep feet on floor • __________ • Put trash in cans • _________ • Take litter with you • __________ Respect Yourself • Do your best • __________ • Wash your hands • __________ • Be at stop on time • __________ • Use your words • __________ • Listen to speaker • __________ Respect Learning • Have materials ready • __________ • Eat balanced diet • __________ • Go directly from bus to class • __________ • Go directly to class • __________ • Discuss topic in class w/ others • __________

  39. RAH – at Adams City High School(Respect – Achievement – Honor)

  40. RAH – Athletics

  41. Reviewing Strive for Five • Be respectful. • Be safe. • Work peacefully. • Strive for excellence. • Follow directions. McCormick Elem. MD 2003

  42. RRespectTo show consideration, appreciation, and acceptance • Respect yourself• Respect others• Demonstrate appropriate language and behavior IIntegrityAdherence to an agreed upon code of behavior • Be responsible• Do your own work• Be trustworthy and trust others DDisciplineManaging ones self to achieve goals and meet expectations • Strive for consistency• Attend class daily; be on time• Meet deadlines; do your homework PPerseveranceHolding to a course of action despite obstacles • Stay positive• Set goals• Learn from mistakes EExcellenceBeing of finest or highest quality • Do your personal best• Exceed minimum expectations• Inspire excellence in others NEHS website, Oct. 26, 2004

  43. Identify and Teach Expectations • Complete Identifying School-wide Expectations Checklist • Add items to action plan as needed

  44. Cool Tool Examples • http://www.nhcebis.seresc.net/exemplar.phphttp://www.d84.org/DP/DP%20new%20pages/DP%20PBIS.html

  45. Expectations & behavioral skills are taught & recognized in natural context Expectations

  46. Expectations