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Travelers’ Safety

Travelers’ Safety

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Travelers’ Safety

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  1. Travelers’ Safety Presented by Gordon Dupont Renee Dupont-Adam

  2. The Program 1. Just a few statistics Aviation is the Safest mode of transport there is. The odds of being killed on a commercial flight are 1 in 19.3 million. You are 9 ½ times more likely to be killed by lightning 2. The secret to survival How to improve the odds in your favour 3. A look at a survivable accident – Beating the odds 4. Where is the Safest place to sit? This might surprise you 5. The seven rules to survival Simple once you realize the reasons why 6. Open forum Anything goes except marriage counseling or politics

  3. Gordon - New Guinea 1961 I am an ex Transportation Safety Board Accident Investigator with 52 years of aviation experience Which one is the Pilot and which is the Bishop?

  4. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7

  5. The Most Dangerous Form of Transportation Known to Man(Not counting the space shuttle) In any form of accident he will be in a world of hurt – If he survives

  6. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7 Walking 5.3

  7. Texting Increases the Unfavourable Odds

  8. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7 Walking 5.3 Bicycle 4.3

  9. Not including this bike rider

  10. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7 Walking 5.3 Bicycle 4.3 Automobile .4 Railway .1

  11. The number will likely be higher in India

  12. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7 Walking 5.3 Bicycle 4.3 Automobile .4 Railway .1 Bus .04

  13. Forgot what he was driving today?

  14. 1. Just a Few Statistics There are lies, dam lies and statistics Harry Truman All Travel is a Hazard Fatality Rate Per Mile per 100 Million Passengers Motorcycles 9.7 Walking 5.3 Bicycle 4.3 Automobile .4 Railway .1 But it’s got even better Bus .04 Air .02 US Department of Statistics .01 Last fatal UScommercial air crash (2013) - Aug. 27, 2006 Until July 6th 2013

  15. a) Odds of YOU being on an airline flight which results in at least one fatality: 1. Just a Few More Statistics 1 in 10.0 million b) Odds of YOUbeing killed on a single airline flight: 1 in 19.8 million You have a 53% chance of surviving an aircraft crash So letssee what we can do to improve the odds of the survivour being YOU

  16. 2. The Secret to Survival a) Luck And b)“MP” Mentally Prepared

  17. 3. A look at a Survivable Accident 304 Survivors 2 Crash Fatalities July 6, 2013 San Francisco

  18. 129 Survivors 2 Fatal Aug. 16, 2010 San Andres, Columbia 4. Where is the Safest Place to Sit? #2 Empennage #1 Wing Area #3 Front

  19. 4. Where is the Safest Place Not to Sit? All 108 on board survived April 13, 2013 Bali, Indonesia Just behind the wing

  20. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival Startle Time Can Cut That Time In 1/2 Smoking Can Cut That Time In 1/2 39,000 ft. 15 to 20 seconds 1. Listen to that Safety talk

  21. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 1. Listen to that Safety talk But they’re NOT the same

  22. All Seat Belts are not Created Equal Driver – Right side Passenger – Left side Be Mentally Prepared Aviation ALWAYS From Center

  23. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 2. Count seats forward and back 3. Remember the seats fold down 4. Watch floor lighting 1. Listen to that Safety talk

  24. Floor Lighting (If its working)

  25. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 2. Count seats forward and back 3. Remember the seats fold down 4. Watch floor lighting 5. Keep seat belt on and tight 1. Listen to that Safety talk

  26. Why ALWAYS Wear Your Seatbelt? 11 were injured “Fasten Seat Belt” was on ALL injured were not wearing their seatbelts That could be You

  27. You Never Know When Your Seatbelt Will Be Handy

  28. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 2. Count seats forward and back 3. Remember the seats fold down 4. Watch floor lighting 5. Keep seat belt on and tight 6. Wear non-flammable clothes (wool not nylon) and laced up shoes (No flip-flops or open toed shoes) 1. Listen to that Safety talk a) Nylon and other polymers are not a good protector from heat b) Nylon melts in heat at about 200 C. c) Friction burns can occur if it is rubbed hard. d) Natural fibers like wool and cotton offer better protection

  29. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 2. Count seats forward and back 3. Remember the seats fold down 4. Watch floor lighting 5. Keep seat belt on and tight 6. Wear non-flammable clothes (wool not nylon) 1. Listen to that Safety talk 7. Mentally Prepared: Review in your mind during each takeoff and landing what you might have to do and don’t cross your legs

  30. 119 Aboard – All Survive • Pacific Western Boeing 737 • March 22, 1994 • Engine failed on take-off • Punctured fuel tank & started a fire • All experienced travelers • They were MP • Would you be?

  31. 139 Aboard 52 Don’t survive Manchester UK Aug. 22, 1985 Left Engine failed on takeoff Hole in fuel tank Slowly stopped and taxied off runway • Tourists with limited flying experience • More passengers - Charter - Many elderly • First ones stopped to get their hand luggage • Negative panic (Waited for the aisle to clear and someone to tell them what to do ) • NOT MP

  32. 5. The Seven Rules to Survival 2. Count seats forward and back 3. Remember the seats fold down 4. Watch floor lighting 5. Keep seat belt on and tight 6. Wear non-flammable clothes (wool not nylon) 1. Listen to that Safety talk 7. Mentally Prepared: Review in your mind during each takeoff and landing what you might have to do and don’t cross your legs 7.5 A Smoke Hood --The Poor Man’s Smoke Hood

  33. Most Survivable Aircraft Accident Fatalities are the Result ofSmoke Inhalation • System Safety Services offers a small, light and very inexpensive Safety tool to help you survive any smoke related incident • The Emergency Smoke Hood enables a person to both see and breathe in a smoke filled atmosphere • This atmosphere can be in a downed aircraft or a hotel & apartment hall or even a home • The hood provides three to four minutes of precious time to get out of the life threatening atmosphere • But note the following cautions

  34. Emergency Smoke Hood Cautions • This hood is heat resistant and NOT flame proof • The person must be Mentally Prepared to use it and have it readily available in an emergency • It is not a toy and must be kept out of children's reach • Review the accompanying instructions and practice using it • Your life could depend on it

  35. AND MOST IMPORTANT LEAVE YOUR BAGGAGE BEHIND • Your only priority must be to get out of the aircraft. • Taking baggage takes time that could cost lives – Yours? • The airline will pay for all “lost” baggage • Just don’t even think about doing it • Be Mentally Prepared

  36. First Fatal Airplane Crash September 17, 1908 Lt. Thomas Selfridge Killed Orville Survived 1st Fatality in Almost 5 Years Of Flying 50% Survival Rate

  37. 6. Open Forum • Any questions? • Any comments? Deep Vein Thrombosis Thanks for attending and may all your flights be the Safe ones The Airline Solution Now to Avoid: • Exercise • More exercise • Still more exercise • Drink lots of water • Traveler compression sox Gordon Dupont Renee Dupont-Adam • Baby aspirin (But check with your doctor first)