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Chapter 6

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Chapter 6

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  1. Chapter 6 Air Sampling and Testing Air Monitoring • Asbestos • Lead • Biological Contaminants • Mold • Formaldehyde • Volatile Organic Compounds • Radon • Particulates • Detector Tubes

  2. Chapter 6 Air Sampling and Testing Air Monitoring • Asbestos • Lead • Biological Contaminants • Mold • Formaldehyde • Volatile Organic Compounds • Radon • Particulates • Detector Tubes

  3. Asbestos exposure limits vary according to the classification of the fibers.

  4. Asbestos fibers are collected with an asbestos sample pump that must maintain a constant airflow during sampling.

  5. Harmful exposure to lead occurs when an item that contains lead is disturbed, such as paint.

  6. Lead air samples are usually collected in a special canister that is then sent to a laboratory for testing.

  7. Most laboratories offer a description of the density of fungal material found in a mold sample using generic terminology, such as levels one through four.

  8. Under a microscope, biological contaminants look quite different from one another.

  9. Mold sampling procedures vary when using the tape or vacuum air-sampling methods.

  10. OSHA has set formaldehyde exposure limits for indoor air quality.

  11. Formaldehyde sampling involves collecting particles with a passive (nonpowered) sampler and then sending the sampler to a laboratory for analysis.

  12. The EPA has set some limits for radon exposure.

  13. Radon leaks into various parts of a building from the basement or ground floor, making occupants susceptible to illness.

  14. When sampling for radon levels, the detectors must be placed 4′ to 5′ above the floor, no less than 4′ from objects in unobstructed areas, and must not be physically disturbed while operating.

  15. Some particulate exposure limits are in place for general particulates that may not be definable.

  16. Particulate detectors and counters sample a precise amount of air and then perform testing to identify the number of particles in the air sample.

  17. Detector tubes use time-weighted exposure (1 hr, 2 hr, 3 hr, etc.) to determine the average amount of contaminants in the air of a space.

  18. A detector tube measurement is read by dividing the indicated detector tube measurement by the number of exposure hours.