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Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

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Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

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  1. Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Muskegon Public Schools June 11 & 20 MAREC Center MAISD MTSS/School Improvement Partnership

  2. Like Me • Move back from your table so you have room to stand • Stand for all statements that are true for you. • As you stand, remember to look about and see who else is standing

  3. Team Time

  4. Setting Group Expectations • To make this day the best possible, we need your assistance and participation • Be Responsible • Attend to the “Come back together” signal • Active participation…Please ask questions • Be Respectful • Please allow others to listen • Please turn off cell phones and pagers • Please limit sidebar conversations • Share “air time” • Please refrain from email and Internet browsing • Be Safe • Take care of your own needs

  5. Acknowledgements The material for this training day was developed with the efforts of… • Cathy Claes • Melissa Nantais • Anna Harms • Jennifer Rollenhagen Content was based on the work of… • Rob Horner, University of Oregon • Tim Lewis, University of Missouri • George Sugai, University of Connecticut • Anne Todd, University of Oregon

  6. Who will do what? Facilitation of Today’s Work ✔ Notetaker ✔ Facilitator for discussions ✔ Timekeeper for discussions ✔ Active team member ALL: What are the big ideas we need to bring back to our whole staff?

  7. Scope and Sequence of the Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports Series Day 1 • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior Day 2 • Acknowledging Expected Behavior and Correcting Behavioral Errors (Part One) • Acknowledging Expected Behavior and Correcting Behavioral Errors (Part Two) • Responding to Behavioral Errors • Data-Based Decision Making

  8. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  9. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  10. What is Multi-Tiered System of Supports / Response to Intervention? • A total school initiative with the goal of optimizing learning for all students • About responsive and supportive teaching

  11. MTSS: A Continuum of Supports Intensive Intervention / Tier 3 Individualized, functional assessment, highly specific for few(5%) Universal Prevention / Tier 1 Core Instruction, allstudents, preventive, proactive and should meet the needs of at least 80% of the students relating to mastery of critical skills. A good core has materials to use with lower-performing students as well. Targeted Intervention / Tier 2 Supplemental, some(15%) students, reduce risk Students within Schools Center area refers to students with IEPs

  12. What is Multi-Tiered System of Supports / Response to Intervention? Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) is a framework to provide all students with the best opportunities to succeed academically and behaviorally in school. MTSS/RtI focuses on providing high quality instruction and interventions matched to student need, monitoring progress frequently to make decisions about changes to instruction or goals. Data are used to allocate resources to improve student learning and support staff implementation of effective practices.

  13. Key Features of MTSS/RtI • Focus on success for all students • Data-based decision making and problem solving • Universal screening • Continuous progress monitoring • A core curriculum is provided for all students • A modification of core instruction is arranged for students who are identified as nonresponsive • Continuum of evidence-based interventions • A specialized and intensive curriculum for students with intensive needs • Focus on fidelity of implementation and outcomes focused • Parent and community involvement (MAISD Implementation Team/MDE)

  14. What is the Goal? To create an integrated Behavior and Academic Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) that can be implemented with fidelity, is sustainable over time and utilizes data-based decision making at all levels of implementation support.

  15. Essential Principles in All MTSS/RtI Trainings Create systems, not just programs, to support each and every student Earlier, rather than later Evidence, not opinion

  16. Partner Activity • On your own: Write on a scrap of paper or sticky, How would you explain MTSS/RtI to your (non-educator) spouse or a friend • Share with your table group. • Be prepared to share.

  17. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  18. Leadership Team “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” Henry Ford

  19. Purpose of the Leadership Team To coordinate and manage the implementation of an MTSS/RtI model by: • Planning for implementation of a continuum of supports with fidelity (develop process/procedures and tools). • Developing and supporting school-based implementation capacity (professional development, technical assistance, coaching). • Using data for continuous improvement of student outcomes.

  20. Work of the Leadership Team • Develop the capacity of all staff members to perform the responsibilities required by a MTSS/RtI model • This capacity will be different for differing roles and responsibilities within the developing systems • Create the organizational structures to support continuous improvement • Customize implementation at the building level to meet specific building needs • Use data to drive the work and planning

  21. Why do we need a PBIS LeadershipTeam? Implementation of Effective Practices with and without an Implementation Support Team (Balas & Boren, 2000; Fixsen, Blase, Timbers, & Wolf, 2001)

  22. “I swear to share the wealth of tasks, responsibilities, and information with all staff. I will not burn myself out by trying to do everything. Instead, I will agree to let others lead beside me.”

  23. The Power of Teamwork to Solve Problems

  24. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  25. What is a Mission Statement? • A statement of the purpose of an organization, its reason for existing. • The mission statement should guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path, and guide decision-making. • Answers the question, "Why do we exist?"

  26. Establishing a Mission & Vision for your School Leadership Team Start with your school’s mission statement • Does it reflect your work in implementing and sustaining an integrated Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS)? • How might you further define it to include the work of the School Leadership Team related to implementing a positive approach to school discipline?

  27. Sample Mission Statement The purpose of implementing Positive Behavior Supports and Interventions at Genoa-Kingston High School is to create a sense of community through a positive environment in which all members are actively contributing. 

  28. Example Mission Statements Millbrook PBIS Mission Statement:  The PBIS team at Millbrook works to promote student achievement and responsibility by providing a safe and caring environment where students are a part of a family with teachers and staff serving as positive role models.

  29. Example Mission Statements We at Moon School all take responsibility to inspire to academic excellence, promote respectful, responsible and safe behavior, and seek community and parental involvement.

  30. What is a Vision Statement • A Vision statement outlines where you want to be. Communicates both the purpose and values of your team/school. • A vision statement talks about your future. • It lists where you see yourself some years from now. It inspires you to give your best. It shapes your understanding of why are you working here. It shapes all of your actions and decisions.

  31. Communicate your Vision Statement • To your school staff • To your school families • To your district Your PBIS vision statement will guide your School Leadership Team’s efforts to implement and sustain PBIS.

  32. Team Time: Vision Task: Brainstorm on your own some thoughts for the team’s vision for the culture and climate of your building for the future and write several on sticky notes: • In a school with a positive, healthy school climate and culture: • What will staff believe about a positive approach to discipline/management? • How will students act/behave? • How will staff act, treat students, treat other staff, and treat parents? • What is our philosophy? • Share ideas with your team, compare and look for similarities and patterns. • Come to consensus on one initial idea.

  33. Team Time: Vision Future Task: • Be thinking about how the vision can be communicated to key stakeholders • To your school staff • To your school families • To your district Intended Outcome: • Your team will have a clearly stated vision statement for the work of implementing and sustaining PBIS within your school. Your PBIS vision statement will guide your School Leadership Team’s efforts to implement and sustain PBIS.

  34. Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS)/ Response to Intervention (RtI) is a framework to provide all students with the best opportunities to succeed academically and behaviorally in school. MTSS/RtI focuses on providing high quality instruction and interventions matched to student need, monitoring progress frequently to make decision about changes to instruction or goals. Data are used to allocate resources to improve student learning and support staff implementation of effective practices.

  35. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  36. Big ideas of PBIS

  37. OUTCOMES SYSTEMS INFORMATION PRACTICES Summary of PBIS “BIG IDEAS” 1. Systems • Team-based problem solving • Data-based decision making • Long term sustainability 2. Information • On going data collection & use • SWIS • Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS) • Suspension/expulsion, attendance, tardy • Program Quality Measures (BoQ, SAS, SET) 3. Practices • Intervention or practice has evidence to support its efficacy

  38. Break • See you in 10 minutes

  39. Reflection Time • On your own: think about who was your favorite teacher and why. • Share with an elbow partner.

  40. Starfish STARFISH

  41. Today’s Outcomes • Introduction to Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) / Response to Intervention (RtI) • Purpose of School Leadership Teams • Establishing our Mission/Vision • Creating Effective Systems for Sustainable Implementation • Introduction to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) • Identifying and Defining Behavioral Expectations • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior

  42. Reflection Time • In your building, what typically are the approaches, actions, reactions related to classroom management and disciplining students? • How are these approaches and actions working to improve overall behavior? • What might be some of the practices that are not effective or creating barriers to student success?

  43. Why Change? Research validated indicators for change

  44. School Practices that Promote Serious Discipline Problems • Unclear rules and expectations regarding behavior. • Inconsistent and punitive schoolwide, classroom, and individual behavior management practices. • Failure to correct rule violations as well as to recognize and reward adherence to rules. • Ineffective overuse of verbal reprimands, restrictions, suspensions, expulsions and other aversive consequence to “control” student behavior. (Jenson, Evans, Morgan, & Rhode, 2006)

  45. Traditional Approaches to Dealing with Difficult Behavior Punishment Exclusion

  46. Without SW-PBIS Without SW-PBIS, when punishing problem behaviors is the primary strategy: Punishment is associated with increased: • aggression • vandalism • truancy • tardiness • dropping out (Mayer, 1995; Mayer & Sulzer-Azaroff, 1991)

  47. Without SW-PBIS Punishment of problem behavior: • Fosters environments of control • Occasions and reinforces antisocial behavior • Shifts ownership away from school • Weakens child-adult relationship • Weakens relationship between academic & social behavior programming

  48. Typical Responses to Student Misbehavior • Watch the student more closely for future problem behavior • Re-review rules and consequences • Become increasingly more punishing • Apply punishments more consistently • Establish the “bottom line.”

  49. Why Change? • Academic and social goals are not being achieved. • High rates of problem student behavior resulting in loss of academic learning time. • Inconsistent response to behaviors across environments. • Evidence does not support suspension, detention, expulsion as real solutions. • We are often just putting out fires instead of having a significant effect on long term social/emotional growth.

  50. Why Not Just Focus on a “Few?” • If we only respond to the toughest students, we will never get to all of them, and we may make more! • All children and youth need a “village” to return to (school and community) • Bystanders (peers, parents/family, teachers, others) are the village! –These are the “primary socializing agents” Jeffrey Sprague