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Watershed Watch Protocols Level I PowerPoint Presentation
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Watershed Watch Protocols Level I

Watershed Watch Protocols Level I

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Watershed Watch Protocols Level I

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  1. Watershed Watch Protocols Level I

  2. Goals for this module • Understand how biomonitoring is used to evaluate the health of a stream • Learn how to sample the stream community • Learn how to identify organisms in the stream • Learn how to quantify your findings

  3. Stream organisms require • access to food • refuge from predators • tolerable temperatures • sufficient oxygen • tolerable chemical conditions A degraded habitat may not support some organisms

  4. Benthic macroinvertebrates • benthic – bottom of the stream; macro – visible with the naked eye; invertebrate – no backbone • ubiquitous and easy to collect • relatively sedentary • vary in sensitivity to habitat alteration and pollution Good Mid Range Poor

  5. A diverse community representing a range of tolerances

  6. A less diverse community dominated by tolerant species

  7. Utility of macroinvertebrate surveys • problem identification screening tool • used in prioritizing sites • rapid screening

  8. True or False. The presence of pollution tolerant species such as leeches is an indication of poor water quality

  9. True or False. The presence of pollution tolerant species such as leeches is an indication of poor water quality False.

  10. Goals for this module • Understand how biomonitoring is used to evaluate the health of a stream • Learn how to sample the stream community • Learn how to identify organisms in the stream • Learn how to quantify your findings

  11. Sampling your stream • Equipment to bring • Selecting the site • Sampling protocol

  12. Equipment to bring • Boots, waders, or shoes that can get wet • D-frame or 10-inch aquarium net • Light-colored plastic pan • Field guides, key, and illustrations for identification • Magnifying glass • Biological monitoring assessment datasheet

  13. Selecting the site Choose one or more riffles in your stream reach

  14. Sampling protocol Fill out the top portion of the biological assessment form

  15. 1/2 meter line • Sampling protocol – traveling kick • Set net in riffle • Kick and stir 1/2 meters above net • Rinse net in pan containing a small amount of water • Repeat at five different locations in riffle to produce one composite sample • Inspect and remove large debris • Identify organisms and calculate score • Carefully rinse net and pan before sampling another stream

  16. Sampling protocol – low gradient • Estimate habitat present • “Jab” net in representative habitat • Rinse net in pan containing a small amount of water • Repeat at ten different locations in the reach to produce one composite sample • Inspect and remove large debris • Identify organisms and calculate score • Carefully rinse net and pan before sampling another stream

  17. For each site, how many kick-net samples should be taken? What should you do if your reach does not have any riffles?

  18. For each site, how many kick-net samples should be taken? Five. These can be combined to form one composite sample. What should you do if your reach does not have any riffles?

  19. For each site, how many kick-net samples should be taken? Five. These can be combined to form one composite sample. What should you do if your reach does not have any riffles? Look for other habitats that might support macroinvertebrates. Use the low gradient sampling protocol if necessary.

  20. Goals for this module • Understand how biomonitoring is used to evaluate the health of a stream • Learn how to sample the stream community • Learn how to identify organisms in the stream • Learn how to quantify your findings

  21. Tools for identification • Images from the reverse side of the bioassessment form • Dichotomous key (included in training manual) • Field guides (Voshell, J. R. 2002. A guide to common freshwater invertebrates of North America. McDonald and Woodward Publishing Company, Blacksburg, VA)

  22. Identify the following macroinvertebrates B C A B. Newton 2003 F D E Images from http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/course/ent525/water/aquatic/index.htm

  23. Identify the following macroinvertebrates B C A Crane fly larva Caddisfly larva Water Penny B. Newton 2003 F D E Mayfly larva Scud (isopod) damselfly larvae Images from http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/course/ent525/water/aquatic/index.htm

  24. Goals for this module • Understand how biomonitoring is used to evaluate the health of a stream • Learn how to sample the stream community • Learn how to identify organisms in the stream • Learn how to quantify your findings

  25. Scoring your site Fill out the bottom portion of the biological assessment form

  26. X X X X X X X 3 2 2 9 4 2 15

  27. Submit your data • Give the form to your area coordinator or send it to the watershed watch office • Each site should be assessed once a year in the summer • Ask your area coordinator for help

  28. Goals for this module • Understand how biomonitoring is used to evaluate the health of a stream • Learn how to sample the stream community • Learn how to identify organisms in the stream • Learn how to quantify your findings