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2006 Kentucky River Watershed Watch Results

2006 Kentucky River Watershed Watch Results

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2006 Kentucky River Watershed Watch Results

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  1. 2006 Kentucky River Watershed Watch Results (Or, how your sites measured up…)

  2. What and when? • Herbicides in the Spring • 32 samples in May • Pathogens in the Summer • 158 Synoptic samples in July • 115 Follow-Up samples in Late July / Early August • Chemicals & Nutrients in the Fall • 200 samples in September • Metals in the Fall • 58 samples in September

  3. Where? 240 sites throughout Kentucky River Basin 3%  Lower Kentucky River Basin 6%  Eagle Creek 21%  Elkhorn Creek Watershed) 32%  Palisades 4% Dix River Watershed 5%  Middle Kentucky / Red River Basins 0%  South Fork Kentucky River Basin 0.4% Middle Fork Kentucky River Basin (1 site) 27%  North Fork Kentucky River Basin 30%

  4. 2006 KRWW Sampling Sites 2006 KRWW Sampling Sites 2006 KRWW Sampling Sites

  5. HERBICIDES

  6. HERBICIDES Why monitored? • Potentially harmful to aquatic life and humans through drinking water Where are they coming from? • Runoff from agricultural and residential application How can we minimize their presence in our waterways? • Apply only as absolutely necessary, follow application instructions. • Maintain vegetation around and along waterbodies. • Use recommended agricultural erosion control practices. • Properly dispose of herbicide containers (collection programs) • Do not dump leftover herbicide on ground, down sink, or down stormwater drains.

  7. 2006 Herbicide Parameters • Sampled for 2 herbicides in Spring 2006 • most likely time of year for herbicide application • Triazines • highly persistent in soil • EPA standard of 3.0 micrograms /L for drinking water • 350 micrograms/L for acute aquatic life criteria • 12 micrograms/L for chronic aquatic life criteria • Metolachlor • highly persistent in water • unregulated by EPA

  8. Herbicide Results Triazines ONLY detected at: • K501 (Eagle Creek) – 8.6 micrograms/liter • Greater than drinking water supply standard of 3 ug/L • Less than chronic aquatic life criteria of 12 ug/L Metolachlor found at 4 sites, the greatest being: • K501 (Eagle Creek) – 3.38 micrograms/liter

  9. 2006 Herbicide Detections K501 – Eagle Creek Herbicides detected Herbicide sampling site

  10. PATHOGENS

  11. FECAL COLIFORM / E. COLI Why monitored? • Can indicate presence of other pathogens that may cause illness or infections in people. Where are they coming from? • Failing septic systems, straightpipes, leaking sewage lines • Inadequately treated discharge from municipal sewage plants • Livestock (runoff from pasture or direct access to waterbody) How can we minimize their presence in our waterways? • Properly maintain septic systems • Increase access to sewer systems • Install fencing to keep livestock out of waterways • Maintain vegetated buffers around waterbodies

  12. Pathogen Parameters Fecal Coliform • Swimming Standard of 400 cfu/100 ml (instantaneous) E. Coli • Swimming Standard of 240 cfu/100 ml (instantaneous) Atypical/Typical Coliform Ratio • Ratio between 0 and 2  raw, human sewage • Ratio between 2 and 4  fresh, human/ag • Ratio between 5 and 10  indirect, ag • Ratio between 10 and 20  indirect, urban • Ratio greater than 20  aged, human/ag

  13. Synoptic Pathogen Results (E. coli)62% > Swimming Standard 10 Worst Sites: K282 – Cane Run (9,804 cfu) K264 – UT in Madison County (7,701 cfu) K096 – Graddy Spring (6,488 cfu) K235 – Knoblick Creek (4,569 cfu) K033 – UT of South Elkhorn (4,352 cfu) K300 – Hickman Creek (3,255 cfu) K241 – Viney Fork South (2,909 cfu) K084 – South Elkhorn, trib A (2,909 cfu) K055 – Town Branch (2,447 cfu) K525 – Phillip’s Creek (2,098 cfu)

  14. Synoptic Pathogen Results (Fecal coliform)52%> Swimming Std. 10 Worst Sites: K105 – Blair Branch (11,000 cfu) K527 – Balls Fork (9,300 cfu) K288 – Troublesome Creek (1,700 cfu) K215 – Lost Creek (1,600 cfu) K216 – Troublesome Creek (1,400 cfu) K488 – Troublesome Creek (1,100 cfu) K485 – Cram Creek (1,000 cfu) K490 – Perkins Branch (1,000 cfu) K404 – Red River (980 cfu) K405 – Red River (980 cfu)

  15. 2006 Synoptic Pathogen Sampling Results > 5,000 cfu/100 ml

  16. Follow-Up Pathogen Results (E. coli)67% > Swimming Standard 10 Worst Sites: K307 – Wolf Run (24,192 cfu) K264 – Unamed trib in Madison Co. (12,460 cfu) K414 – Powell’s Branch (7,270 cfu) K180 – Clark’s Run (3,654 cfu) K517 – Springs Branch (3,282 cfu) K055 – Town Branch (3,255 cfu) K300 – Hickman Creek (2,723 cfu) K408 – Kentucky River (1,782 cfu) K085 – Glenn’s Creek (1,119 cfu) K339 – Otter Creek (1,046 cfu)

  17. Follow-Up Pathogen Results (Fecal coliform)71% > Swimming Std. 10 Worst Sites: K445 – Kingdom Come Creek (90,000 cfu) K446 – North Fork Kentucky River (60,000 cfu) K484 – Cram Creek (12,000 cfu) K105 – Blair Branch (12,000 cfu) K090 – Quicksand Creek (8,900 cfu) K485 – Cram Creek (8,000 cfu) K490 – Perkins Branch (6,000 cfu) K527 – Balls Fork (5,700 cfu) K480 – Cowan Creek (4,100 cfu) K447 – Cowan Creek (3,600 cfu)

  18. 2006 Follow-Up Pathogen Sampling Results > 5,000 cfu/100 ml

  19. Eagle Creek Focused Pathogen Sampling • 5 sites, Grant County • 319 Septic Improvement Project • Ten Mile Cr and Arnold’s Cr Subwatersheds • Narrow exceedances of recreational standard: • 2 Ten Mile Creek sites • Eagle Creek site, downstream from Ten Mile

  20. Upper Eagle Creek Watershed

  21. K319 - 165/ 15,530 K327 – 329/ 9,090 K321 – 262/ 11,690 K328 – 306/ 16,160 K318 – 172/ 15,760 Eagle Creek Watershed 2006 E. coli Findings Geometric Mean/ High Value

  22. NUTRIENTS

  23. NUTRIENTS Why monitored? • Lead to algal blooms, which consume oxygen as they decompose  bad for aquatic life • Cause taste and odor problems in drinking water • Can cause “Blue baby” disease (or methemoglobinemia) Where are they coming from? • agricultural and residential fertilizer application • sewage and manure runoff How can we minimize their presence in our waterways? • Only apply fertilizers as necessary • Properly maintain septic systems • Use recommended erosion control measures • Keep livestock out of waterways, properly manage manure • Maintain vegetated buffers around waterbodies

  24. Nutrient Parameters Nitrate (NO3-N) • Drinking Water Supply Std. = 10 mg/L Total Phosphorus • Unofficial KRWW Aquatic Life Std. = 0.5 mg/L Sulfate • Drinking Water Supply Std. = 250 mg/L

  25. Nitrogen Results > 10 mg/LOnly One Site! K499 – Town Branch (12.09 mg/L)

  26. 2006 High Nitrate Site K499 – Town Branch

  27. Phosphorus Results > 0.5 mg/L K283 – Rocky Fork (7.44 mg/L) K338 – Otter Creek (1.76 mg/L K209 – Tates Creek (1.7 mg/L) K529 – Elkhorn Creek (0.81 mg/L) K031 – South Elkhorn Creek (0.75 mg/L) K341 – Elkhorn Creek (0.7 mg/L) K085 – Glenn’s Creek (0.69 mg/L) K499 – Town Branch (0.69 mg/L) K026 – South Elkhorn Creek (0.65 mg/L) K530 – Tates Creek (0.57 mg/L)

  28. 2006 High Phosphorus Sites

  29. Sulfate Results 20 sites > 250 mg/L Ten Greatest Sulfate Results: K542 – Sandlick Creek (1,910 mg/L) K481 – Little Dry Fork (1,410 mg/L) K215 – Lost Creek (906 mg/L) K536 – Long Branch (904 mg/L) K483 – Henry Ison Hollow (700 mg/L) K535 – Sturgill Branch (652 mg/L) K488 – Troublesome Creek (648 mg/L) K216 – Troublesome Creek (647 mg/L) K083 – Lotts Creek (623 mg/L) K479 – Rockhouse Creek (528 mg/L)

  30. 2006 High Sulfate Sites

  31. HEAVY METALS

  32. HEAVY METALS Why monitored? • High levels can be toxic to aquatic life or humans through drinking water • Can interfere with industrial water uses Where are they coming from? • Mining • Industrial discharges • Stormwater runoff from roads and parking lots How can we minimize their presence in our waterways? • Comply with discharge permit conditions • Use erosion control measures at mining sites and other construction sites • Install retention ponds, vegetated filter strips around parking lots and along roads (stormwater management practices)

  33. Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Boron Cadmium Calcium Chromium Cobalt Copper Gold Iron Lead Lithium Magnesium Manganese Nickel Phosphorus Potassium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Thallium Tin Vanadium Zinc Metal Parameters (30) * Strikethrough = no detections

  34. Antimony – no detections Barium Beryllium Chromium Copper Iron Lead – no detections Manganese Nickel Selenium – no detections Silver – no detections Thallium – no detections Zinc Metal Parameters with Standards (13)

  35. Metals with Standards AND Detections (8)

  36. 2006 High Metals Sites K542 - Sandlick Creek K536 – Long Branch

  37. 2006 Sites of Concern K085 - Glenn’s Creek, Woodford County pathogens, phosphorus K215 & K216 - Lost Creek, Breathitt County (* also in 2005) pathogens, sulfate K283 - Rocky Fork, Garrard County pathogens, phosphorus (greatest 2006 result) K338 – Otter Creek, Madison County (* also in 2005) pathogens, phosphorus K479 - Rockhouse Creek, Letcher County pathogens, sulfate

  38. 2006 Sites of Concern (continued) K488 - Troublesome Creek, Perry County pathogens, sulfate K499 - Town Branch, Fayette County pathogens, nitrate, phosphorus K536 - Long Branch, Letcher County sulfate, metals K542 - Sandlick Creek, Letcher County sulfate, metals

  39. 2006 KRWW Sites of Concern

  40. Highest Pathogen Sites K105 – Blair Branch, Letcher County K282 – Cane Run, Mercer County K445 – Kingdom Come Creek, Letcher County K307 – Wolf Run, Fayette County

  41. 2006 Sites with Greatest Pathogen Results

  42. KGS to the Rescue! Kentucky Geological Survey creates new online database for Kentucky River Watershed Watch.

  43. NEW KRWW ONLINE DATABASEhttp://kgsmap.uky.edu/website/krww/viewer.asp WHY THIS WILL MAKE EVERYONE HAPPIER: Volunteers Fast, easy access to all data Data Manager  Data updates made easier Common, shared database (less confusion / errors) Volunteer Coordinator  Easy addition of new sites Automatically calculates lat/long info when entered

  44. WEBSITE FEATURES • Zoom in past 1:500,000 to see site ID labels  Click on site or sites to see all historical data • Use “Area Tool” to zoom to single site or group of sites • Use “Measure Tool” to find distance between 2 points  Use “Zoom to a Location” to zoom to a selected location (county, road intersections, stream extents, etc.)

  45. Kentucky River Authority Watershed Grant Program Grant offerings of up to $3,000 for watershed education, sampling, assessment, restoration projects Applicants must be nonprofit organization, school, or local government Applications will be accepted again in Fall ’07